THE ARCHIVES (ar' kiv) n.pl.
1) The last frontier
2) The place to discover new worlds


THE ARCHIVES --A PLACE FOR DISCOVERY

What is an archives? No, it's not a chain of islands in the South Pacific. It's not a case of painful itching. And archivists are not people who plot rebellion and bloody insurrection.

What is an archives then? Informally defined, an archives is a collection of unpublished documents and other materials preserved for research use.

An archives is a place where one-of-a-kind materials are kept--the original records of days gone by. It's the place where you can find out right from the "horse's mouth" what really happened and how the people who experienced it felt about it.

In the archives, you can do bottom-line research--going back to the original, unpublished materials, getting the real story as it happened--not pre-digested and regurgitated on the pages of a book. It's the kind of research that pays off in the Eureka! of personal discovery.

Yes, there are frontiers left for modern-day adventurers. So don your exploring gear, saddle that steed--and get ready to explore the frontiers of history!


RELIVING THE DRAMA OF MISSIONS AND EVANGELISM THROUGH THE YEARS

Every archives collects something special. No archivist would be so foolhardy as to try to collect everything that is available on every subject.

The Archives at the Billy Graham Center specializes in collecting and preserving unpublished information that tells the story of North American Protestant non-denominational missions and evangelistic activities through the years.

The archives contains four kinds of Protestant nondenominational records: *Records of American evangelists and evangelistic organizations, with information on people like:

Billy Graham ... Billy Sunday...William Biederwolf ...Tom Skinner ... John Wilbur Chapman...Charles Finney... Henry W. Stough... John Perkins and Mel Trotter.

*Records of faith or independent mission boards and churches, mission service organizations,a dn other instituions, like:

Youth for Christ ... Africa Inland Mission...World Evangelical Fellwship Gospel Recordings ... InterVarsity ... Latin America Mission... China Inland Mission ... and Mission Aviation Fellowship.

*Records of significant evangelical seminars and conferences, like:

Wheaton Congress on the Church's Worldwide Mission (1966) ... International Congress on World Evangelization (1974) ... Evangelicals for Social Action ... World Communications Congress (1970) ... and Consultation on World Evangelization.

*Records of individual Christian workers, clergy and laypeople, including personal papers and tapes or oral history interviews, with information on people like:

Hudson Taylor ... Donald McGavran...Jim Elliot...Gordon Lindsay...William Booth...John and Betty Stam ... J. Herbert and Winnifred Mary Kane... Jonathan and Rosalind Goforth ... and Corrie Ten Boom

WHY A MISSIONARY ON LEAVE FROM ZAIRE CRIED WHEN SHE SAW A BARREL OF 89 CENT SCREWDRIVERS

It was innocent enough. A barrel of screwdrivers in a hardware store. So, friends and strangers alike were amazed when the missionary took one look and burst into tears. Why did she cry? There was a logical explanation--one that was rooted deep in her experience of life in Zaire as a missionary.

What's it really like to be a missionary? How do well-known evangelists handle personal disappointments? What are the struggles Christian leaders have shared with only their closest friends? You'll find things in the archives that you won't find in the history books--or any other books.

FIND OUT WHAT HAPPENED WHEN A U-BOAT SANK THE ZAM-ZAM

You'll find the answer to the missionary's tears in Collection 169, Tape Tl. Or, see how God rescued a Peruvian man who was buried alive (Collection 204, Box 1, Folder 7). Or, what happened when a Tibetan tribesman got mad at his entire village and decided to use the missionaries to get back at them all (Collection 205, Tape T2). Or find out why a Denver doctor kept a bottle of sawdust on his desk, along with his mother's Bible (Collection 197, Box 1, Folder 3). Discover what led to the founding of the first American agency created to send single women to the mission field. Answers to questions you never even thought to ask--the archives has it all.

TEN SURE CURES FOR BOREDOM

Bored? When you can watch the pulpit-pounding, stage-stomping antics of Billy Sunday on film? For a change of pace--an exotic glimpse into another time and place--come to the archives. No need to be bored when you can:

See what happened when Henry W. Stough took on the "Booze Kings" of Scranton, Penn. Or view "Jungle Blood Hunters," a 30-minute film on Vietnam in the early 1950s. (Rated: must see.) Learn about frontier life in the early 18OOs--from the perspective of missionaries to the Wild West. Or, find out how a baby opened the door to missionary work in the Ngawa Kingdom in Tibet.

TEST YOUR LANGUAGE SKILLS--INDENTIFY GOSPEL SONGS AND MESSAGES IN 2,000 LANGUAGES

See what Billy Graham looked and sounded like in the crusade that brought him national attention in 1949. Read the little-known facts about the Chicago businessman who was the force behind the founding of many of today's largest Christian organizations.

See the Battle of Gettysburg from the perspective of a confederate soldier writing home to his father.

Or, experience the Boxer Rebellion or the Congo Crisis with the missionaries who lived through them.

Or learn about Consuella York's decades of ministry as a chaplain in Chicago's Cook County Jail.


FROM THE FARTHEST CORNERS OF THE EARTH

Carefully lift the yellowed stationary from the protective folder--and the sights and sounds of the Persia of 100 years ago come clamoring into the quiet room. You're handling letters that were penned by an excited missionary newly arrived in an exotic country far from the sunny windows and well-padded chairs of the archival reading room.

From the far corners of the earth the materials have come--letters, diaries, scrapbooks, reports, maps, posters, inter-office memos, financial ledgers, blueprints, photographs, slides, cassette tapes, video tapes, microforms, and films.

SIT BACK, OPEN THAT FOLDER OR TURN ON THAT TAPE. IT'S TIME FOR ADVENTURE

Information on thousands of people, organizations, movements, and cultures are contained in hundreds of collections available to you for use in the archival reading room.

Anyone may use the materials in the archives at no charge. Simply register, sign a form, and you have access to information available nowhere else. There are comfortable desks and chairs for reading, cassette players for listening, and equipment for watching film and video tapes. The reading room at the archives--there's a new world waiting for you!


ARCHIVAL ADVENTURE IS WAITING FOR YOU!

Ok. So you're ready for adventure. Now what? If that stuff is so rare, it must be a real hassle to use. There'll be all kinds of rules, and someone will be watching over your shoulder to make sure you don't fold, spindle, or mutilate something valuable.

Wrong again! There are a few guidelines for using the materials, which the archivist will cheerfully explain. But no one will be reciting rules to you and anxiously watching your every move.

The archivists at the Billy Graham Center are some of the friendliest people in town. They are delighted to have you use the materials. After all, that's why all that information has been collected in one place--so that it can be used conveniently.

AT THE ARCHIVES, ITS YES-YES, NOT NO-NO

The archivist will be glad to help you get the most out of your research. They'll make suggestions, show you how to use the files, even give you ideas for a research paper.

If you want to see how you can make use of archival research for personal information, classroom assignments, or just for fun, come to The Archives at the Billy Graham Center. There's a whole new world waiting for you.


THE ARCHIVES OF THE BILLY GRAHAM CENTER LOCATION: The archival reading room is located on the third floor of the Billy Graham Center on the campus of Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois

HOURS: M-F 10 am to 5 pm - Sat. 10 am to 2 pm

PHONE: (630) 752-5910.

E-MAIL: bgcarc@wheaton.edu

If you have a special interest you want to explore and you live out of town, it is a good idea to call in advance to make sure that the materials you want to use will be available.

ASK THE FORMER GENERATIONS AND FIND OUT WHAT THEIR FATHERS LEARNED, FOR WE WERE BORN YESTERDAY AND OUR DAYS IN EARTH ARE BUT A SHADOW. WILL THEY NOT INSTRUCT YOU AND TELL YOU? WILL THEY NOT BRING FORTH WORDS FROM THEIR UNDERSTANDING? Job 8:8-10 (NIV)


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Last Revised: 6/21/00
Expiration: indefinite

Wheaton College 2005