Billy Graham Center
Archives

Papers of William Ashley "Billy" Sunday and Helen Amelia (Thompson) Sunday - Collection 61

[Note: What follows is a description of the documents in this collection which are available for use at BGC Archives in Wheaton, Illinois, USA. The actual documents are not, in most cases, available online, only this description of them. Nor are they available for sale or rent. Some or all of this collection can be borrowed through interlibrary loan. ]

Table of Contents

Brief Description of This Collection

Title Page and Restrictions

Biographies of William and Helen Sunday

An Essay on the Contents of the Collection (Scope and Content)

    I. William A. Sunday - General Correspondence
    II. Helen T. Sunday - General Correspondence
    III. Sunday Family Correspondence
    IV. Evangelistic Campaign Files
    V. Sermons, etc.
    VI. Press Clippings
    VII. Scrapbooks
    VIII. Photographs
    IX. Receipts and Check Stubs
    X. Miscellaneous
    XI. Sunday Papers Supplement
Other Information Which Will Be Helpful to the User of This Guide
Lists of Microfilm, Negatives, and Photographs in This Collection (Location Records)
    Microfilm
    Negatives
    Photographs
List of the Contents of Boxes of Paper Records in This Collection (Container List)
    I. William A. Sunday - General Correspondence
    II. Helen T. Sunday - General Correspondence
    III. Sunday Family Correspondence
    IV. Evangelistic Campaign Files
    V. Sermons, etc.
    VI. Press Clippings
    VII. Scrapbooks
    VIII. Photographs
    XI. Sunday Papers Supplement


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An online exhibit about Billy Sunday

Click here to link to a Web page with an online audio file of Billy Sunday's "Booze" sermon.

Part of this collection is available for inter-library loan. Click for more information.

Other institutions which have the microfilm edition of the Sunday papers.

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Click to see the presentation ""Make This the Best Year of Our Lives": Scenes of Christian Ministry from the Year 1898.", which includes material from this collection.



Brief Description.
Microfilm edition of originals in Winona Lake, Indiana, including correspondence, sermons, reports, revival ephemera, and scrapbooks dealing mainly with the career of evangelist Billy Sunday from its beginning to his death and about the work of his wife Helen, who, besides acting as his general manager, was a fundamentalist leader in her own right, especially after his death. The collection also contains information about the Prohibition movement in America and life on the home front during World War I.



Collection 61
[February 6, 2008]
Sunday, William Ashley; 1862-1935
Sunday, Helen Amelia Thompson; 1868-1957
Papers; 1882 [1888-1957] 1974, n.d.

Microfilm, Negatives, Photographs

Restrictions

The originals of this microfilm collection are in the library of Grace College and Theological Seminary in Winona Lake Indiana. They were processed, organized, described and microfilmed in 1978 as part of a joint project of the Archives of the Billy Graham Center at Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois and Grace College and Theological Seminary, Winona Lake, Indiana, under the supervision of the Center's archivist, Robert Shuster. Persons wishing to quote from any of the documents in the collection in any published work must obtain permission from:

The Librarian
Grace Schools
Winona Lake, IN 49590


Biography of William Ashley Sunday, Sr.

Full name William Ashley Sunday, Sr.
Birth November 19, 1862, Ames, Iowa
Death November 5, 1935 , Chicago, Illinois. Buried in Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Illinois
Family
Parents William and Mary Jane (Corey) Sunday
Siblings Two older brothers: Albert Monroe and H. Edward Sunday and a half-brother, Leroy Heizer, and half-sister, Elizabeth Heizer
Marital Status Married Helen Amelia Thompson, September 5, 1888
Children Helen Edith (1890-1932), George Marquis (1892-1933), William Ashley, Jr. (1901), Paul Thompson (1907)
Conversion At the Pacific Garden Mission in Chicago, 1886
Ordination 1903 by the Presbyterian Church
Education
1887-1888 Evanston Academy of Northwestern University (winter term)
Career
ca. 1876-1883 Held various jobs including fireman, janitor, and undertaker's assistant
1883-1888 Played professional baseball for the Chicago White Stockings (1883-1888) and the Pittsburgh and Philadelphia clubs (1888-1891)
1891 Entered full-time Christian service as a worker at Chicago's YMCA
1893 Worked for evangelist J. Wilbur Chapman and Milan B. Williams
1896-1920s Began holding evangelistic campaigns starting in Garner, Iowa. These meetings gradually became large scale, city-wide evangelistic campaigns as Sunday's fame spread
1898 Licensed to preach by the Presbyterian Church
1917 Lengthy campaign in New York City
1920s-1935 Smaller Sunday campaign meetings
Other significant information
1912  Received a Doctor of Laws degree from Westmont College
1917 Wrote, Love Stories of the Bible 
1935  Received a Doctor of Divinity degree from Bob Jones College 
 Billy Sunday's style of preaching won him an enormous amount of newspaper exposure, as did the enthusiasm with which his campaigns were received. He used colorful, slangy language and entertained and instructed his audiences with mimicry, impersonations, as well as memorable epigrams and anecdotes. His messages laid great stress on every human being's need for personal salvation through Jesus Christ and on the authority and reliability of the Bible. He was also a strong critic of alcoholic beverages and favored their prohibition in his most famous sermon, Get on the Water Wagon. He was a popular speaker on the Chautauqua lecture circuit as well.

He was also deeply involved in support of the American war effort: helping to sell war bonds, speaking on the need to save food and fuel, and vigorously encouraging young men to enlist. Sunday, throughout his career, was a critic of American moral laxity and an unabashed admirer of American civilization.

For most of his ministry, Sunday had vocal critics as well as defenders. Like famous evangelists who preceded him, he was taken to task by liberal church leaders for being too simplistic in his theology, while others insisted that he placed too much emphasis on individual piety and salvation at the expense of social reform. Some ministers who participated in his campaigns complained that they received little benefit from the meetings because those who came forward already belonged to churches or had only a vague idea of what Sunday was asking them to commit themselves. Secular journalists, such as John Reed and George Creel, accused Sunday of being a tool used by the ruling elite to defuse lower class discontent. The suspicion was often expressed or inferred in newspapers that Sunday was little more than a grafter getting wealthy from his temporary congregations. Supporters, however, disagreed that Sunday's meetings did not produce results, denied any personal dishonesty on his part, and dismissed criticisms of his theology since the criticisms were based on a world view and understanding of Christ's gospel very different than Sunday's.

Large scale evangelistic campaigns received much less national attention after the first world war. However they continued to be an important of the life of fundamentalist and Pentecostal churches. Sunday was affected by a parallel decrease in his national exposure and influence, although until his death he never lacked invitations to speak and hold campaigns. Besides leading meetings, Sunday spent much of his time defending the constitutional amendment on the prohibition of alcoholic beverage and fighting its repeal. He was involved as well in the management of the Winona Bible Conference (later Winona Institutions and later the Winona Christian Assembly). Personal troubles such as the well publicized difficulties and divorces of his sons, George Marquis and William Ashley, added great sorrow and financial difficulties of his later years.

Biography of Helen Amelia Thompson Sunday

Full name Helen Amelia Thompson Sunday
Birth June 25, 1868
Death February 20, 1957, Arizona
Family
Parents William and Ellen (Binnie) Thompson
Siblings Jennie, Ada, William, and ?
Marital Status Married William Ashley Sunday, Sr., September 5, 1888
Children Helen Edith (1890), George Marquis (1892), William Ashley, Jr. (1901), Paul Thompson (1907)
Other significant information
 From about 1908 on, Helen Sunday was in effect the general manager of the campaigns and had final control over almost all parts of the work, including finances and the hiring and firing of staff.

Mrs. Sunday began an active ministry shortly after her husband's death. She traveled extensively throughout the country helping to raise money for rescue missions and similar Christian institutions, addressing youth rallies, serving on the boards of the Winona Christian Assembly and Bob Jones University (from which she received an honorary LLD in 1938), and giving talks on her husband's career and influence. In the early fifties, she spoke at some of Billy Graham's crusades as well as those of other evangelists. She traveled out of the country on a pleasure trip to Europe in 1937 and again in 1952 on a trip to Quito, Ecuador, to attend the ceremonies celebrating the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Voice of the Andes radio station. As with her husband, family problems and sickness (she had a heart attack in 1948) added sorrow to the last decade of her life.



[Note: In the Scope and Content Description, the notation "folder 2-5" means "Box 2, Folder 5"]

Scope and Content

Until 1977, the material in this collection was stored in various locations in the Billy Sunday Home in Winona Lake, Indiana. The original arrangement of the materials, if any existed, was no longer discernible so the processor divided the material into the following groups based on subject content. (Note: Through the collection are many items dated by the archivist by internal evidence. The date for these items usually appears in pencil in the upper right hand corner.) As described on page 24, boxes 29 and 30, were not included in collection list or the microfilm nor were the photographs files in boxes 24 through 28.

The Archives has many other collections with information about the life and ministry of Billy and Helen Sunday. A list of some of these collections can be found on page 25 of this guide.

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I. William Ashley Sunday - General Correspondence; 1888-1935; n.d. (box 1 and 31)

This box contains all the evangelist's correspondence written to and by non-family members, as well as a few of the letters of his son, George M. Sunday, dating from the period of George's tenure as business manager of the Sunday organization. Also in this section are some letters not written to or by Sunday but which were sent on to him. Almost all the correspondence is incoming. Only a few items are signed by Sunday. The files are arranged in chronological order, except for the first file which contains undated letters. In all other folders, the letters for the period of time covered by the file are arranged chronologically and any items which have no specific dates are in the back of that particular file.

The contents of this box document all the phases of Sunday's career after his marriage, although it is weakest from 1888 to approximately 1910. The folders are described below, decade by decade. Mention should be made of one type of letter which is found all the way through this section. The testimonial which tells how the writer or a friend or relative benefitted from Sunday's preaching. Several of these are scattered through the box.

No Date File (folder 1-1) - This folder contains a miscellany of items such as a proposed agreement between Sunday and G. Walter Barr for the writing of Sunday's biography, an endorsement by Sunday of Burton Holme's Travelogues and a summary by Kansas City attorney Edward M. Bartlett of accusations made against Sunday by a Horace J. Budges. The accusations include plagiarism, unethical conduct and devil worship.

1880s Files (folder 1-2) - These contain some items referring to Sunday's baseball career, such as a letter ordering him to report to training camp (folder 1-2) and a draft of a baseball contract (folder 1-2).

1890s Files (Folder 1-3 through 1-10) - Some brochures in this group describe the program of the YMCA where Sunday was employed during this period. Also in the group are the first letters from people who have experienced Sunday's evangelistic efforts (folder 1-7) and an invitation to hold a meeting (folder 1-8).

1900s Files (folders 1-11 through 1-18) - These folders contain much which document Sunday's growing influence, such as a letter from the mayor of Burlington, Iowa telling how the town is cracking down on alcohol, thanks to Sunday's campaign there

(folder 1-14); the highly laudatory replies received by the Freeport, Illinois, ministerial association after they sent questionnaires to towns which had already had Sunday campaigns asking about advantages and drawbacks (1-15); and copyright notices for several of Sunday's sermons. A will of Sunday's is included in the group (folder 1-15). (In folder 31-1 are letters Rev. Sunday wrote home to his wife in November, 1908, probably during meetings in Ottumwa, Iowa.) Correspondents included J. Wilbur Chapman, William J. Lockhart, and William J. Mayo.

1910s Files (folders 1-19 through 1-28) - The files for these years, during which Sunday held his largest meetings and reached the peak of his national newspaper and magazine exposure, document in many different ways the public interest in Sunday, the organization of Sunday's campaigns, and the evangelist's priorities. A great deal of the correspondence in folders 1-23 and 1-24 deals with biographies of Sunday which appeared in this decade, including an authorized one by Elijah "Ramshorn" Brown. Several letters are from Brown, while others are from Revell, the publisher. Most of the letters deal with the details of printing and distributing the book on which Sunday received a royalty. Eventually, Brown and Sunday reached an agreement by which Sunday received all proceeds from the book. Other correspondence from about the same time is from Theodore Thomas Frankenberg who was writing an unauthorized biography and was seeking, unsuccessfully, Sunday's cooperation. The great public interest in Sunday is also demonstrated by a long letter from Frank P. Spellman, offering to pay Sunday to hold evangelistic meetings as part of a circus. Sunday's polite refusal is filed with the letter (folder 1-26). (Folder 31-1 includes a note from a woman who attended Sunday's 1910 Youngstown meetings, telling how the meetings converted her husband.)

The manner in which Sunday campaigns were run is illustrated by a great many items. Some letters are from cities inviting Sunday to their community. Among these are letters of invitation and support from the ministers of New York City (folder 1-25), and similar invitations from a cross section of civic groups of Norfolk, Virginia (folder 1-28). Also dealing with invitations are letters from Fort Worth, Texas, on the pros and cons of having a Sunday campaign (folder 1-27). Fears were expressed that the controversial Rev. J. Franklyn Norris would dominate the meetings. A letter from Omaha, Nebraska (folder 1-23) contains the response of the ministerial association of that city to Sunday's request that it postpone its campaign. Other letters from aide Fred Spiece give details on tabernacle construction (folder 1-27). A copy of a speech, possibly given by Sunday, to ushers on their duties provides insights into the duties of this group (folder 1-27). Letters from another aide, A.B. McDonald, give anecdotes and public relation tips. Some letters are from other evangelists applying to work for Sunday's organization (folder 1-27). Folder 1-26 contains Sunday's appraisal, for the New York Tribune, of the results of the campaign in that city. Follow-up practices are touched upon in a letter from R.A. Torrey to Sunday explaining the negative reaction aroused by an enthusiastic Sunday worker in Los Angeles. One aspect of the financial side of the campaigns is illustrated by a list of income taken in from various cities in 1917 (folder 1-27).

Many letters deal with criticism of Sunday or even lawsuits against him. Lawsuits accusing Sunday of plagiarism or slander and libel are commented on in letters in folders 1-23 and 1-27. Criticism on the part of Methodist and Presbyterian ministers is described in a letter from David M. Conn (folder 1-22). The file for the year 1915 contains letters of friendly support sent to the evangelist in response to accusations of plagiarism leveled by his pianist, B.D. Ackley. Also in this file is a letter from department store magnate John Wanamaker describing how he was trying to help Ackley with his problems (folder 1-24). A letter from aide Fred Spiece, who supervised tabernacle construction, contains his resignation and complaints against what he felt was unfair treatment (folder 1-27).

Sunday's patriotic activities during World War I are touched on in a letter from the U.S. Treasury thanking him for his help in War Loan drives (folder 1-26) and a letter from Herbert Hoover thanking Sunday for his contribution toward food conservation (folder 1-26). An interesting series of letters from YMCA leader John R. Mott casts cold water on Sunday's hope of going to Europe to preach to the troops (folder 1-28). A letter from General Leonard Wood's secretary contains several epigrams and anecdotes in favor of universal military service for Sunday to use in his sermons (folder 1-26). Also connected with the war are the letters responding to Sunday's efforts to get his son, George, a commission (folder 1-26).

Sunday's crusade for the prohibition of alcohol in the United States is touched on in several letters, particularly one from Arthur Capper, Governor of Kansas (folder 1-25). Other letters detail the campaign to make Boston a dry city (folder 1-25).

Some miscellaneous interesting papers include correspondence about the goals and purposes of the Interdenominational Evangelist League (folder 1-19), letters written in response to Sunday's request to baseball experts on their suggestion for an article he was writing on the ideal 1911 baseball team (folder 1-20), reports from Billy Sunday clubs (folder 1-28), and a letter from Speaker of the House of the United States Congress describing the arrangements for Sunday's appearance there are in folder 1-27.

Correspondents, in order of appearance in the files, include: C.S. Denee, H.O. Jennings, Connie Mack, Rudolph Blankenberg, Edward Bok, Edward H. Bookmyer, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., French E. Oliver, Joseph B. Buffington, Theodore Roosevelt, Henry Leland, Frank Spellman, Harold Bulkley, Robert Lansing, Charles Curtis, Frank B. Kellogg, William McAdoo, Joseph Daniels, W.S. Jewell, Rhys R. Lloyd, George Truett, and J. Franklyn Norris. Many letters from congressmen, senators, and government administrators thanking Sunday for passes to the meetings of his 1918 Washington campaign are in the 1918 file.

1920s Files (folders 1-29 through 1-38) - Some of the reasons and results of Sunday's declining influence are illustrated in the material in this group of folders. Other letters are from people seeking to enlist his still great authority on behalf of a particular cause or thanking him for aid. Among letters of the first type are those from doctors and friends urging him to slow down for his health's sake and, of very great interest, a letter from Homer Rodeheaver analyzing, from Rodeheaver's point of view, some of the reasons why Sunday's crusades were not as effective as they once were (folders 1-34, 1-38).

More numerous are letters asking Sunday's support. One such is a note from William Jennings Bryan asking for Sunday's aid during the Scopes trial in Tennessee (folder 1-34). An interesting selection of memoranda was sent to Sunday by West Virginia coal mine owners during the time when Sunday was leading several evangelistic campaigns in that state. The memoranda state the mine owners' case against unions. Another letter from a W. A. Chamberlain outlines a plan for Sunday to lead a travel tour of Palestine (folder 1-37). A note from Charles Curtis, then Vice President-elect of the United States, thanks Sunday for his help in Herbert Hoover's presidential campaign. (folder 1-38).

Some items deal directly with Sunday's campaigns such as the letters sent to Sunday by municipal leaders urging him to hold another campaign in Boston (folder 1-29), and a list detailing his income from 1919 meetings (folder 1-29).

A few other of the interesting documents for these years include an analysis of Sunday's character by the National Educational Institute (folder 1-34), which equates him with Julius Caesar, Napoleon, and Theodore Roosevelt, among others; some friendly notes from Calvin Coolidge (folder 1-35, 1-36, 1-37);; and reports from Billy Sunday clubs across the nation.

Correspondents, in order of appearance in the file, include: T.S. Southgate, Allan C. Emery, Charles Schwab, Elbert H. Gary, Edwin Holt, Hughes Channing, H. Cox, Willard Warner, Edward T. Hanford, William Mayo, Calvin Coolidge, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., W. J. Harahan, W.E. Pietsch, and Angus W. McLean.

1930s Files (foldes 1-39 through 1-44) - The files for the last years of Sunday's life contain numerous invitations to hold meetings for either evangelistic or anti-alcohol purposes. One invitation is to address the national meeting of the Business Men's Evangelistic Club (folder 1-24) while another is to hold a campaign in Alaska (folder 1-42). A letter from F. W. Hollenrake assured Sunday his church was not pentecostal and hoped, therefore, that Sunday would be willing to come to speak (folder 1-43). The Anti-Saloon League proposed he participate in a series of national rallies (folder 1-44).

Some items suggest new avenues of ministry for Sunday such as a letter from Rodeheaver suggesting that Sunday film some of his sermons for distribution (folder 1-40) or the letters from several sources relating how much they enjoyed hearing Sunday on the radio and suggesting he broadcast regularly.

Many pieces of correspondence express sympathy for the tragedies they suffered in these years: the death of daughter Helen in 1932, Sunday's heart attack in 1933, and the death of son George the same year.

Other letters include a note of appreciation and support from the Kanton Klan

(folder 1-40); reports on the problems of the Bible Conference in Winona Lake; responses to Sunday's autobiographical articles published in the Ladies' Home Journal in 1932 and 1933. Almost the last item in this section is a copy of the honorary Doctor of Laws degree given to Sunday in 1935 by Bob Jones College.

Correspondents, in order of appearance in the file, include: Myers Y. Cooper, G. Walter Barr, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., William Mayo, Harry Clark, W.E. Biederwolf, Herbert Hoover, J.P. McCallie, Homer Rodeheaver, Stewart P. MacLennan, Florence F. Kinney, Walter Bennett, Mel Trotter, Homer Hammontree, George H. Lorimer, Carl R. Gary, A.B. MacDonald, Joseph Buffington, J. Warren Davis, W.W. Atterbury, Arno C. Gaebelein, Bob Jones, Sr., Martha C. Pohnert, J.C. Penney, J.W. Jenkins, Oswald Smith, W.T. Watson, J.A. Bandy, E.J. Rollings, Daniel C. Roper, W.S. Hart, J.L. White, W.M. Rucker, M.A. Matthews, Howard Blanchard, William Carey Thomas, D.B. Bulkey, and John H. Wiles.

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II. Helen Amelia Thompson Sunday - General Correspondence; 1888-1957; n.d. (box 2)

This box contains Helen Sunday's correspondence written to and by non-family members as well as letters not written to or by her but sent on to her. Again, as in Rev. Sunday's general correspondence, almost all these materials are incoming with only a very few outgoing signed by Mrs. Sunday. The principles of arrangement are the same as in box 1. Except for the first folder, which contains undated items, the folders are arranged chronologically according to year, one folder for each year except for the year 1935. The correspondence for that year is contained in ten chronologically arranged files (folders 2-43 through 2-52). Within each file the correspondence is arranged chronologically. Any items which have no date except for the year are placed in the back of the file. (Note: On the microfilm of this collection, all labels refer to Mrs. Sunday as Helen T. Sunday. The T. is for Thompson, her maiden name. Her middle name was Amelia.)

The narrative below describes some of the general themes of Mrs. Sunday's correspondence, decade by decade. Through the whole box are testimonial letters addressed to her describing the beneficial effects of her husband's preaching on various people.

No Date File (folder 2-1) - The letters in this folder vary widely in interests, as might be expected, and include a note listing staff salaries in the Sunday organization probably during the late 1910s or early 1920s; order forms for the autobiographical booklet, Ma Sunday Still Speaks; invitations to speak about Billy; a note called "Your Life in Christian Service" about her life; a letter from a Melton Wright relating his desire to write a biography of Billy Sunday; and a missive from Homer Rodeheaver asking if she would be willing to look at a script for a movie about her husband. This letter might date from circa 1947 or 1948. (Folder 31-1 contains the following: a note from fellow evangelist Mel Trotter to Mrs. Sunday on the development of Winona Lake, Indiana; a letter from the President of Columbia Bible College in Columbia, South Carolina to Mrs. Sunday, asking her to speak to a Bible class; and an undated epistle from Mrs. Sunday's daughter-in-law, Harriet.)

Other correspondents in this file include Harry Vom Bruch, Merv Rosell, Dick Hillis, T.A. Reynolds, and S.D. Clarke.

1890s Files (folders 2-3 through 2-8) - Most of this correspondence is from friends and/or people Mrs. Sunday was counseling on personal problems.

1900s Files (folders 2-10 through 2-17) - A few letters in this group are from other Christian workers reporting on their work. For example, Frances Patterson gives an account of the foreign missions field (folder 2-10, and the superintendent of the Pacific Garden Mission relates the news of her organization (folder 2-17). An interesting letter from a friend offers to advance Mrs. Sunday funds to take her husband to a "voice culture artist" in Chicago in order to train his voice (folder 2-14).

1910s Files (folders 2-18 through 2-27) - Perhaps the two dominant themes of this group of correspondence are the involvement of the Sundays in various publishing ventures and Mrs. Sunday's supervision of the staff of the Sunday organization as they prepared different cities for a Sunday campaign.

As in box 1, many letters are contained in these folders from Elijah Brown and Theodore Thomas Frankenberg, authors of books on Sunday. Frankenberg was primarily seeking, often with little success, information and approval (folder 2-21). The relationship was much closer with Brown since his was an authorized biography and the Sunday received a share of the profits. Besides letters from Brown and the publisher, Fleming Revell, on distribution of the books, there is an interesting message from Robert Matthews of the Sunday staff on the best public relation techniques to use to boost the books' sales (folder 2-21). Yet another biographer, W.T. Ellis, wrote to gather information for his book, Billy Sunday - the Man and His Message (folder 2-22). Unauthorized attempts to capitalize on Rev. Sunday's fame were discouraged as shown by letters detailing the action the Sundays' lawyers took to get a newsreel film about the evangelist off the market (folder 2-24) and by a letter Mrs. Sunday wrote to a Boston reporter, Paul Waite, insisting that he not combine his articles on Sunday into a book. Some letters from G. P. Putnam Sons describe the details of publishing Sunday's book, Love Stories of the Bible (folder 2-25).

Other letters describe the sales of pamphlets containing Sunday's sermons. Some letters are related to Mrs. Sunday's own published effort -- a newspaper column called Ma Sunday's Column distributed by Bell Syndicate in 1917 and 1918 and very likely ghost written by Hugh Weir. There is a letter to Weir from the head of Bell Syndicate suggesting that the column have more uplifting content (folder 2-25). Also relating to Mrs. Sunday's column is a letter from Bell Syndicate detailing the distribution of the column (folder 2-25), and letters from readers of the column asking for advice (folder 2-25 and 2-26).

Other material illustrates the control Mrs. Sunday had over all aspects of the campaigns. Important local leaders such as John Wanamaker (folder 2-21) would write to her to ask for a place on Rev. Sunday's schedule, while L. Wilbur Messer from Chicago would describe how that city was getting ready for a series of Sunday meetings and ask that that series not be postponed (folder 2-24). Also from Chicago came a letter from a construction company executive explaining his plan for building a tabernacle (folder 2-26). (Note: The target following this letter on the microfilm which stated that the blueprints accompanying this letter were filmed with box #17 was in error. The plans for the tabernacle are on reel 26 of the microfilm collection.) Numerous reports came in from staff members, especially advance representative James Walker, explaining (folders 2-24, 2-26) what they were doing and asking for direction. Others wrote to apply for work (folder 2-26). People even sent Mrs. Sunday anecdotes for her husband to use in his messages. Some letters contain reports of prohibition successes around the country (folder 2-24).

An interesting series of letters in folder 2-23 came from people, including fellow evangelist Charles Fife, sympathizing with the Sundays over the charges of plagiarism leveled by former staff member Ackley. Ackley, himself, a few years later (folder 2-26) wrote a letter denying that he had anything to do with recirculating the charges and indicating his friendly spirit toward that Sundays. Other letters in this group contain get well wishes sent to Mrs. Sunday after her 1917 operation on a closed fallopian tube.

Correspondents, in order of appearance in these files, include: W.A. Horan, Jay W. Somersville, John Callahan, Rose Fitts, C.L. Goodell, Theodore Roosevelt, Irving Putnam, H.H. Pitzer, John Linden, C.R. Wheeland, Otis E. Dale, Joseph Ramsey, and J. Pritchard.

1920s Files (folders 2-28 through 2-37 - These folders also contain some letters from staff members and former staff members including one from Robert Matthews describing his activities and commenting on the J. Franklyn Norris murder trial (folder 2-34) and one from Homer Rodeheaver detailing several criticisms of the organization of Sunday campaigns (folder 2-35). Another item dealing with the campaigns is the list of income from meetings in 1924, 1925, and 19265 (folder 2-36). Other letters touching on Winona Lake describe the plans in 1924 to hold a special showing in that town of Cecil B. DeMille's film The Ten Commandments (folder 2-32). Another letter from family friend DeMille offered advice on a contract the Sundays were contemplating signing with World Wide Pictures, giving that company permission to film Rev. Sunday's life (folder 2-37).

Correspondents, in order of appearance in the file, include: Fred Rapp, Charles Erdman, Charles Mayo, and J.D. Williams.

1930s Files - The records of this decade are dominated by the family tragedies which included Rev. Sunday's death, and by Mrs. Sunday's emergence as an important Christian leader in her own right.

A few letters seek to console Mrs. Sunday over son George's death in 1933 and her husband's illness in early 1935. There are hundreds of letters and telegrams in the files of sympathy sent after Billy Sunday's death later that year (folders 2-45 and 2-51). Many of these letters relate incidents from his life or include a poetic or prose work on him or suggest a fitting memorial to his memory. The Presbytery of Chicago sent a copy of a resolution passed eulogizing him (folder 2-52). (He was buried in Forest Home Cemetery, just outside of Chicago.) A transcript of his funeral service, delivered by H.A. Ironside, is contained in folder 2-46. Some men wrote the widow asking for permission to write another Sunday biography, and R.A. MacFarland suggested that Mrs. Sunday compose one (folder 2-52). She and B.D. Ackley did put together a collection of Sunday's epigrams for Zondervan Publishing House, which distributed it in 1937 as Billy Sunday Speaks. A letter from Ackley deals with some problems he had in working with that company (folder 2-54).

Other materials document Mrs. Sunday's activities as one of the most influential members of the Bible conference in Winona Lake. William Biederwolf, the director of the organization, wrote her often about its problems. One letter is a long response to the suggestion that he resign (folder 2-39). James Heaton, later in the decade, did much to revitalize the institution (it was renamed Winona Lake Institutions), and he also sent reports to Mrs. Sunday, along with copies of the new articles of incorporation, by-laws, and rules and regulations (folder 2-54).

Several items are from Bob Jones, Sr., evangelist and founder of Bob Jones College (later University). One letter describes the ceremony at which an honorary degree was conferred on Rev. Sunday in absentia (folder 2-43). Others request help in fund-raising (folder 2-51) and describe the progress of the school (folders 2-54 and 2-55).

Some of the other interesting letters include reports on prohibition crusades across the country (folder 2-43); correspondence about the Sundays' investments (folders 2-38 and 2-39); a letter from a friend detailing why Rev. Sunday should consider campaigning in England (folder 2-38); a query from the Ladies' Home Journal about the series of articles Rev. Sunday was writing for that magazine (folder 2-39); a script for Mrs. Sunday's appearance on the radio program, Favorite Foods of Famous Folks (folder 2-41); an unusual note from R.G. Allen of the Knoxville Baseball Club denying that he had ever said Rev. Sunday approved of ball playing on the Sabbath (folder 2-42); a few souvenirs of Mrs. Sunday's 1937 trip to Europe (folder 2-54); and reports from several Virginia Asher Business Women Councils across the nation (folder 2-55).

Correspondents, listed in order of appearance in the file, include Chelse C. Sherlock; Florence Miller; Clinton Howard; William Asher; Harold D. Clarke; E.J. Rollings; O.G. Christgau; Homer Hammontree; Loren E. Pecaut; Albert K. Roswll; A.P. Fitt; Harold F. Berry; John Rice; M.B. Williams; Harold Vom Bruch; John Fletcher; John D. Rockefeller, Jr; Franklin Roosevelt; Evangeline Booth; C.M. King; John Wiles; William Mayo; Charles Weigle; James E. Walker; Milford Lyon; William S. Bennett; Will Houghton; J.M. Chapple; Frank Brown; Dewitt Johnston; and Grace Saxe.

1940s Files (folders 2-57 through 2-66) - Mrs. Sunday's involvement in Christian work and her efforts and those of others to perpetuate the influence and fame of Billy Sunday are the major topics of this set of papers.

Many Christian institutions sent Mrs. Sunday fairly regular personal reports on their development and their need for funds. Pacific Garden Mission' director, Harry Saulnier, for example, often wrote describing his activities (folders 2-58, 2-61, 2-64, 2-65, and 2-66). John Huffman, President of the Winona Lake School of Theology, sent similar letters for that institution (folder 2-58 and 2-61). Regional leaders of Youth for Christ sent many requests to Mrs. Sunday asking her to appear at rallies (folder 2-64). In partial recognition of her contribution to the Christian church in general, as well as to Bob Jones College in particular, the college conferred an honorary Doctor of Laws degree on her in 1940 (folder 2-57).

Mrs. Sunday, naturally, was involved in many attempts to memorialize her husband. Homer Rodeheaver suggested that a series of radio spots be produced in which an actor would read some of Sunday's sermons in the evangelist's style (folder 2-64). He also later suggested that a film might be made about Sunday's life (folder 2-65) and sent along a proposed treatment written by Charles E. Skinner (folder 2-62). Another letter of Rodeheaver's responds to Mrs. Sunday's discouragement of the idea (folder 2-62). Some letters are concerned with the 1947 Jubilee in Garner, Iowa, celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the first evangelistic campaign Sunday preached (folder 2-64). Both Mrs. Sunday and Rodeheaver attended. A letter from O.E. Sanden, Dean of Northwestern Schools in Minnesota, relates his desire to do some kind of book on Billy Sunday (folder 2-66). A more ambitious project, documented in folder 2-66, was the plan of Helen Sterner to make a film about Billy Sunday with his wife's help. Mrs. Sunday later changed her mind; however and with Bob Jones, Sr.'s help, the project was canceled. Several letters deal with the 1948 ballet based loosely on Rev. Sunday's book, Love Stories of the Bible (folder 2-65). Mrs. Sunday was strongly opposed to the production and several friends wrote to add their complaints. John Huffman sent some legal advice on what he could do to halt performances.

Other interesting correspondence in these folders include several letters from friends defending Rev. and Mrs. Sunday from a published criticism of them by Westbrook Pegler (folder 2-59), a copy of a letter by R.G. LeTourneau criticizing Homer Rodeheaver for associating with Seventh Day Adventists, and a copy of a reply by Rodeheaver defending the orthodoxy of that denomination (folder 2-64).

Correspondents, in order of appearance in these files, include: Frances Youngren; Willis Haymaker; Daniel Boone; K.A. Anderson; Charles Young; Ernest Reveal; Albert Kraft; Eugene Palmer; Robert Walker; Walter Smyth; Earle W. Brown; Merle Johnson; T.D. Gladdis; Lee Roberson; William Ward Ayer; Oswald Smith; Jack Wyrtzen; Torrey Johnson; Bob Jones, Jr.; Frances Miller; Wilbur Smith; T.W. Wilson; W.W. White; Robert A. Cook; Fred Zarfas; and C. LeRoy Hughes.

1950s Files folders 2-67 through 2-74) - The records in the last group of folders in this section continue to show Mrs. Sunday's activity in Christian work and her attempts to defend and perpetuate her husband's reputation.

In 1950, Mrs. Sunday went to Quito in Ecuador to attend the anniversary celebration of the Voice of Andes, missionary radio station HCJB. A few letters are concerned with her trip (folder 2-67) while others are reports sent to her after her return from friends she had made there (folder 2-69). Many Christian institutions continued to send her reports, such as the Winona School of Theology (folders 2-68 and 2-70) and the Billy Sunday Memorial Tabernacle in Sioux City, Iowa (folder 2-68). A minister in Lima, Ohio, asked for and received Mrs. Sunday's help in his struggle to get a town ordinance passed forbidding the sale of liquor on Sunday (folder 2-68). Mrs. Sunday's participation in the crusades of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association is touched on in a 1952 letter from Cliff Barrows. Related to this last item is a script for Billy Graham's radio program, The Hour of Decision, which was taped at Winona Lake (folder 2-69).

During the fifties, once again several attempts were made to produce a film about Billy Sunday. Hans Rosenwald proposed a memorial film on the evangelist in a letter to Mrs. Sunday and received a reply from Arthur McKee suggesting the project be indefinitely postponed (folder 2-69). Another attempt is documented in an agreement between Lee Thomas and Mrs. Sunday which stated that Mrs. Sunday granted all movie, television and theatrical rights to Rev. Sunday's life to Thomas and he would produce a respectful tribute (folder 2-72). In a different medium, a letter from Eugenia Price discussed the scripts on Rev. Sunday's life which she wrote for the radio program Unshackled (folder 2-68). A different kind of tribute to Sunday was the attempt to have him admitted to the Baseball Hall of Fame, described in a letter from Emery Paricky (folder 2-70). William McLoughlin wrote letters to Mrs. Sunday asking her help in the scholarly biography he was planning on her husband (folders 2-67 and 2-71). A very critical review of McLoughlin's book is in the 1955 file.

A letter from Lloyd Knox deals with dissension within the board of the Winona Christian Assembly (folder 2-72).

Correspondents, in order of their appearance in the files, include: Gertrude Wales, Bob Jones, Jr., A.J. Knudson, B.D. Zondervan, Robert Walker, Glee Lockwood, Jack Schuler, Robert Cook, John Ramsey, and Arch MacKinney.

*****

III. Sunday Family Correspondence; 1886-1974; n.d. (boxes 3 and 4)

In boxes 3 and 4 are arranged approximately three generations of the personal correspondence of William Ashley and Helen Amelia Thompson Sunday, their descendants, other relations, and a few close friends. The cycle starts with love letters exchanged by Sunday and his bride-to-be. (Folder 31-1 contains additional love letters written from 1886-1888 by William and Helen Sunday during the engagement and the beginning of their marriage.) The majority of letters written between 1890 and 1900 are from Sunday. They tell a little bit about his baseball travels and later about his campaigns but dwell mostly on domestic concerns. In the 1910s, besides Sunday, major correspondents include his daughter, Helen (Sunday) Haines, who lived in Michigan, and his sons: George Marquis, William Jr., and Paul Thompson Sunday, who eventually settled in California and Arizona. Letters are concerned with the growing families and business enterprises of the children. Most of the elder Sunday's letters continue to be to his wife reporting on his travels and on personal matters. A very few letters are concerned with business such as some correspondence in 1914 from son-in-law Mark Haines (folder 4-19), detailing some procedures for distributing the book, The Real Billy Sunday, and a 1915 letter to brother Edward Sunday from his doctor (folder 4-19) on the back of which Rev. Sunday made some notes concerning his reaction to B.D. Ackley's charges of plagiarism. After 1920, letters from the children, daughters-in-law, and the grandchildren become predominant, although there are a few letters from son-in-law Mark Haines and brother Edward. After Rev. Sunday died, Mrs. Sunday apparently kept up an extensive correspondence with her children, grandchildren, daughters-in-law and ex-daughters-in-law although, except for her love letters to Sunday, there are almost none of her outgoing letters in these files. Family tragedies form one major theme of the letters: the premature deaths of George Marquis Sunday Sr., William Sunday Jr., Paul Thompson Sunday, and Paul Haines as well as the many divorces, sicknesses, and financial problems within the family. The strength of Helen Sunday in keeping her family together forms another related theme. A last letter by daughter-in-law Lillian Sunday written in 1974 is a kind of epitaph for this section, describing as it does the lives and deaths of many members of the family.

Some letters, particularly those by Helen Sunday Haines, have some pages out of correct sequence in the microfilm edition of this collection. This is because of the order in which the pages of the letters were written.

The files are arranged chronologically and the letters within each file are also so arranged as far as possible. A folder containing letters for which both the writer and the date are unknown comes first and is followed by several folders containing letters written by a known correspondent but having no date. These are arranged alphabetically according to the name of the writer. The rest of the files are arranged chronologically according to year. The letters and papers within each folder are also arranged chronologically. All folders contain the correspondence for one year except folders 3-24 to 3-37 which contain the 1888 letters and folder 4-19 which contains the 1914 to 1915 letters.

Following is a partial list of correspondents:

Be Haines Paul Haines' wife
Helen Edith (Sunday) Haines (1890-1932) Daughter of William Ashley and Helen Sunday
Mark Haines Husband of Helen Sunday Haines
Paul Haines (ca. 1918- ca. 1957) Son of Mark and Helen Haines, grandson of William Ashley and Helen Amelia (Thompson) Sunday
Ross Hamilton Cousin (?) of Helen Amelia (Thompson) Sunday
Marie Stosskopf Cousin (?) of Helen Amelia (Thompson) Sunday
Alma Sunday First wife (?) of George Marquis Sunday, Jr.
George Marquis Sunday, Sr. (1892-1933) Son of William Ashley, Sr. and Helen Amelia (Thompson) Sunday
George Marquis Sunday, Jr. (ca. 1918 ca. 1968) Son of George Marquis and Harriet Mason Sunday, grandson of William Ashley, Sr. and Helen A. (Thompson) Thompson Sunday
Howard Edwin Sunday (ca. 1860 -?) Brother of William Ashley Sunday, Sr.
Harriet Mason Sunday (?-1960) First wife of George Marquis Sunday
Helen Amelia (Thompson) Sunday Wife of William Ashley Sunday, Sr. and mother (1868-1957) of Helen (Sunday) Haines, George Marquis Sunday, William Ashley, Jr. and Paul Thompson Sunday
Lillian Sunday (?-1976) Third wife of George Marquis Sunday, Jr.
Lurlyne Sunday First wife of Paul Thompson Sunday
Nina Sunday Second (?) wife of William Ashley Sunday, Jr.
Paul Thompson Sunday (1907-1944) Youngest child of William Ashley, Sr. and Helen Amelia Thompson Sunday
Renee Sunday Second wife of George Marquis Sunday, Sr.
Toni Sunday Second (?) wife of Paul Thompson Sunday
William Ashley Sunday, Sr. (1862-1935) Husband of Helen Amelia (Thompson) Sunday and father of Helen Sunday Haines, George Marquis Sunday, Sr., William Ashley Sunday, Jr. and Paul Thompson Sunday
William Ashley Sunday, Jr. (1901-1938) Son of William Ashley, Sr. and Helen Amelia Thompson Sunday
Adie Thompson Aunt (?) of Helen Amelia (Thompson) Sunday
Jennie Thompson Sister of Helen Amelia (Thompson) Sunday
Kate Thompson Sister (?) of Helen Amelia (Thompson) Sunday
William Thompson Cousin of Helen Amelia (Thompson) Sunday
William Thompson, Jr. Brother of Helen Amelia (Thompson) Sunday

*****

IV. Evangelistic Campaign Files; 1909-1934; n.d. (box 5)

The files of this section contain miscellaneous records from various campaigns or one time services conducted by Rev. Sunday. Many folders contain only the stationery of the meetings, which usually lists the dates of the campaign, the local committee heads, and the participating members of the Sunday party. This is the case for the folder on Springfield, Ohio (folder 5-5), for example, or Erie, Pennsylvania (folder 5-7), or Lynchburg, Virginia (folder 5-44). In some cases, pieces of stationery from other parts of the collection have been included. Other folders contain petitions sent to Sunday asking him to work in a community. The Boulder, Colorado, folder (folder 5-3) thus has a mimeographed form with several dozen signatures while the Duluth, Minnesota (folder 5-29) and Canton, Ohio files each contain lists of several hundred names.

Of interest as well are materials documenting Sunday's relatively infrequent contacts with black Americans. Folders 1-26, 22-1, and 23-1 contain information, for example, on the 1917 Atlanta campaign when he made a particular effort to reach the African American population, including segregated meetings.

Other files document in a fragmentary fashion how the campaigns were organized. Files 5-11 and 5-16 contain samples of shares sold by local associations to raise money for Sunday's coming, while folder 5-46 consists of the articles of incorporation formed in Louisville, Kentucky. A list of reservations for various special interests groups is preserved from the Greater Cincinnati Campaign (folder 5-39), while other folders contain descriptions of the responsibilities of various local committees such as transportation, ushers, etc. (folders 5-18, 5-22, 5-27 and 5-28). Some files contain financial records, such as the lists of salaries and expenses of members of the Sunday party (folders 5-26 through 28), while the Los Angeles file (folder 5-25) has a financial report on the receipts and disbursements for the entire campaign. The file for the Fairmont, West Virginia campaign has a less complete report (folder 5-28). An interesting item in some files is the list of sermon titles Sunday intended to preach for a particular campaign (folder 5-22, 5-25, 5-34, 5-58). A handful of files contain reports written after the meetings by Sunday or others on campaign results (folder 5-6, 5-15, 5-19, 5-56). Some of the hard-to-classify items in this section include a column given to Sunday by secretaries of the Philadelphia Tabernacle, signed by each secretary and listing his or her personal favorite sermon (folder 5-15); a souvenir booklet from the Spokane, Washington, campaign with biographies of Sunday, his part, and local ministers as well as descriptions of the meetings and list of some of Sunday's epigrams (folder 5-2); poems written to commemorate the various meetings (folder 5-6, 5-11); a notebook of appreciation from students in Roanoke, Virginia (folder 5-37); and a resolution passed by the Elk Lodge of Charleston, West Virginia, supporting Sunday and denouncing his critics (folder 5-43).

The folder for the New York campaign contains the most material. This file (folder 5-24) includes a photostat copy of the invitation sent to Sunday by interested New York City citizens, petitions, and form letters sent to ministers and others to urge them to participate in activities of the campaign, the bulletins and booklets describing the campaign in general and the plans for following up Sunday's impact.

The files are arranged chronologically according to the date of the meetings. Whenever possible, the full name of the meeting has been put in the file title.

*****

V. Sermons, Addresses, Outlines, Articles, Illustrative Materials and Other Manuscripts; 1891-1949; n.d. (boxes 6 and 31)

This section consists mostly of manuscripts of Rev. Sunday's sermons and sermon outlines, but there are also drafts of books that appeared under the name of Rev. or Mrs. Sunday.

Of extreme interest are the manuscripts contained in boxes 6-8. These make up an almost complete set of the sermons Sunday preached at the New York City meetings (also in this set is one talk given for boys and girls by Homer Rodeheaver.) Those apparently were made from stenographic notes taken while Sunday was preaching. These are arranged chronologically. Since there are almost no audio tapes or sound films of Sunday preaching, these verbatim transcripts are about as close as the researcher can come to hearing Sunday as he was at the height of his fame, preaching during his most famous campaign.

Folder 9-1 contains a booklet with some very early notes of Sunday's which he used when he was giving talks on how to use the Bible in 1891 and 1892. Other notes in the same book may come from talks he gave when he was the advance representative in charge of setting up meetings for evangelists J. Wilbur Chapman and Milan B. Williams.

The rest of box 9 and part of box 10 contain dozens of other sermon manuscripts and sermon outlines. These are arranged alphabetically according to title. Some folders contain more than one version of the same sermons. Others have the copies of the complete talk, the outline for manuscripts, based on internal or external evidence, but that date is only for that particular copy of the sermon. Thus, a manuscript dated 1934 might be the version for that year of a talk Sunday had been giving since 1908. Following the titled sermons are three folders containing untitled sermons (Folder 10-6 through 8). These are divided very roughly according to topic - alcohol and prohibition, patriotic, and religious. Following these are fragments of sermon manuscripts probably by Rev. Sunday. Next (folder 10-10) comes illustrations used by Sunday in his sermons.

Folder 10-11 contains a very interesting statistical summary of the results of various sermons. These notes were apparently made in the autumn of 1916 during the Detroit campaign. They tell the date when each sermon was given, the denominational preference of those who came forward, sometimes what the weather was like, and the number of people who came forward for the same sermon in other cities.

Another interesting folder (folder 10-13) contains samples of the tracts given out to inquirers at Sunday's campaigns. These pamphlets define "What it means to be a Christian" and tell "How to make a success of the Christian life."

Most of box 31 also consists of sermons. First (folders 31-2 through 31-12 and 31-14) come several sermon notebooks--loose leaf binders which contain outlines of one or more talks. Then there is a folder (folder 31-13) containing several revised sermon outlines sent to Sunday in 1919 by his aide, Bentley Ackley. Ackley apparently either wrote or revised several of Sunday's sermons. A letter from Ackley about the sermons is also in the file. Next comes folder 31-15, which contains fragments of sermons notes. Finally, there are several folders (folders 31-16 through 31-59) containing one or more copies of a particular sermon. Most, but not all, of the sermon outlines in the supplement in box 31 are versions of outlines already contained in the main collection.

Following Sunday's sermons are drafts of books and articles which appeared under his name. Folders 10-14 to 10-26 contain versions of chapters prepared for Love Stories of the Bible, published by G. Putnam Sons in 1917. Some correspondence and reviews in Folders 1-26 and 2-25 deals with this book. Each chapter is a retelling in modern vernacular of the biblical romance, such as Samson and Delilah. Some of the chapter drafts are very different from what finally appeared in the book. Folders 10-25 and 10-26 contain drafts for chapters which did not appear in the final version. The rest of the folders are arranged according to their location in the final volume.

A few miscellaneous items follow such as a romance prepared for Woman's Home Companion (folder 10-27), a story written ca. 1917 for troops in training camp suggesting how they should adapt to army life (folder 10-25), an article for a railway magazine on capital and labor (folder 10-29), drafts of autobiographical articles written by Billy Sunday for the Ladies' Home Journal, and chapter titles for a proposed volume called Great Warriors of the Bible.

Behind a partial manuscript of The Real Billy Sunday (folder 10-32) are several folders of material Sunday may have used for reference. This includes a devotional guide by G.W. Buell (folder 10-33), notes sent to Sunday's speech writer and aide, A.B. McDonald (folder 10-34), and several sermons written by other ministers (folder 10-35). Folders 11-1 and 11-2 contain sermons, the authorship of which is unknown. Some of these may also be by Rev. Sunday.

The rest of box 11 contains articles and books written by Mrs. Helen Sunday or appearing under her name. Folders 11-3 to 11-7 contain articles which were written for a newspaper feature called Ma Sunday's Column. These articles appeared in 1917 and 1918 and are brief tales which relate how various seemingly minor habits or vices resulted in the destruction of a girl's happiness. Apparently, there were plans to issue a group of these articles as a book since some of these were filed together with title pages and tables of contents. Correspondence concerning this column can be found in folders 2-25 and 2-26.

There are two other drafts of unpublished Ma Sunday's books in box 11. One is called True Living (folder 11-8), and it is also made up of selections from Ma Sunday's Column. "The Commandment Series" consists of short moral tales to illustrate various of the ten commandments (folders 11-9, 11-10). Folder 11-11 contains various autobiographical articles and speeches Mrs. Sunday wrote between 1936 and 1949. They describe her girlhood, her life with Billy Sunday and contain personal anecdotes about her husband and various campaigns. The last folder in the box contains fragments of speeches and articles, probably by Mrs. Sunday.

*****

VI. Press Clippings; 1888-1976; n.d. (boxes 12, 13 and 32)

Most of the newspaper articles in this section were saved by Rev. or Mrs. Sunday. Obviously, all of the post-1957 items were added to files by the staff of the library of Grace College. Some of the very earliest clippings refer to Rev. Sunday's baseball career, but most of the rest deal with meetings conducted by him or by Mrs. Sunday. The post 1957 articles are historical reviews of Sunday's career. The files are arranged chronologically according to date. Articles for which no date could be assigned are in the "no date" file (folder 12-1). Articles within each file are also arranged in chronological order. Some of the clippings are only fragments and do not contain the whole article.

Box 32 includes a press clipping file (folder 32-1) which contains only a very few items including an interview given by Rev. Sunday to the Knoxville, Tennessee Journal shortly before his death.

*****

VII. Scrapbooks; 1887-1926; n.d. (boxes 14 through 23, 32)

The books in this section were either put together by the Sundays or given to them. Most are for a single crusade and generally contain all the sermons preached by Sunday during the meetings. Two of the scrapbooks are not on evangelistic meetings. Scrapbook #1 in box 14 is an undated book concerned with general stories about Rev. Sunday. Notebook #2 in box 16 contains stories written about baseball teams in 1887. Scrapbooks #6 and #7 are hard to classify. There doesn't seem to be any order to the clippings pasted on the pages beyond the fact that they are generally from campaigns, ca. 1913-1916. Some scrapbooks, such as #16 contain a few pieces of correspondence.

The scrapbooks with one exception are numbered in chronological order and boxed together according to their size. On the microfilm edition of the Sunday papers, the scrapbooks are arranged chronologically instead of according to the box.

The exception is the scrapbook in the Supplement to the Sunday papers. This scrapbook (folder 32-2) covers the 1916 Detroit campaign. In addition to press reports it contains some photos, a list of items lost and found at the Tabernacle, and a letter which breaks down the number of people who came forward by denomination.

*****

VIII. Photographs; 1882-1956; n.d. (boxes 24 through 28)

Note: The photographs were not included in the microfilm edition of the Sunday papers. The originals are at Grace College and Seminary Library in Winona Lake, Indiana. The Billy Graham Center Archives does have 35mm strips of negatives of these photos, as well as proof sheets of positives.

The identifiable photographs in the Sunday collection are in this section. The first two boxes are formal or informal pictures of people. Many of these photos were given to the Sundays by friends and admirers and some are autographed. The files containing the photographs are arranged alphabetically according to the name of the person photographed. Three different groups of photos are each contained in more than one folder. These groups are images of Helen Amelia (Thompson) Sunday, William Ashley Sunday, Sr., and the two of them together. Within each of these groups, the photographs are arranged chronologically according to the date the photograph was taken, if the date can be determined. There are also files on Sunday's home at Winona Lake, Indiana and his ranch in Oregon. A folder marked "Boyhood scenes" (folder 25-7) contains a series of images photographed for the Boston Post, probably ca. 1916. These photographs were taken mostly of the areas where Sunday grew up and include a few shots of the cabin where he was born. For both Helen Amelia Thompson and William Ashley Sunday, Sr., there are files marked "Early" (folders 24-38 and 25-8) which contain undated pictures of them in childhood and early adulthood. The identifications in some of these files are rather tentative.

Box 26 contains photographs and albums from specific meetings as well as some general campaign scenes grouped according to topic. The undated topical files come first and are alphabetically arranged according to title. Then come the photos for specific campaigns arranged chronologically according to the date of the meetings. Boxes 27 and 28 contain oversize photos which would not fit into the standard record center carton.

*****

IX. Receipts, ca. 1900-1957 (box 29)

This box contains receipts for various domestic purchases, bank statements, canceled checks, and miscellaneous personal financial records of the Sundays'. Most of the papers appear to date after the death of Rev. Sunday in 1935. As of the date of this writing (1978), this box is unorganized and unmicrofilmed. There is no container list for this box.

*****

X. Miscellaneous (box 30)

This box contains several negatives of the Sundays, including a series of glass negatives. Also in this box is a newsreel film of Sunday, ca. 1916, and three reels of a taped monologue by Mrs. Sunday, ca. 1954. The transcript of this tape was later edited into the booklet, Ma Sunday Still Speaks. This box contains blueprints of tabernacles as well. These blueprints were microfilmed as the last item on reel 26. Microfilmed with them was a blueprint filed in box 2 with a 1918 letter to Mrs. Sunday from a Chicago construction firm. There is no container list for this box. Except for the blueprints, the material in this box was not microfilmed.

*****

XI. Sunday Papers Supplement

After the completion of the arrangement, description, and microfilming of the Sunday papers in May, 1978, another box of Sunday materials was discovered at Grace Schools. The additional records follow the same arrangement as the main collection: first comes correspondence, then sermon outlines, then press clippings, and finally a scrapbook. All these items have been described above, in the relevant sections.

Provenance

Virtually all the materials in the Sunday collection were found in the residence of Rev. and Mrs. William A. Sunday at 1111 Sunday Lane, Winona Lake, Indiana. Upon the death of Mrs. Sunday in 1957, the house and its contents were deeded to Winona Lake Christian Assembly. In 1972, a small portion of the materials were moved to the Administration Building of the Assembly was controlled Grace Schools; all the assets and liabilities of the W.L.C.A. were assumed by Grace Schools. As one result of the merger, the Sunday documents were moved in 1977 from the Sunday and the Administration Building to the Library of Grace Theological Seminary on permanent loan.

In the early months of 1978, through a joint cooperative effort between Grace Schools and the Billy Graham Center at Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois, the Sunday records were arranged, described and microfilmed under the supervision of Robert Shuster, the Graham Center Director of Archives. Assisting were Robert Ibach (Grace Schools' Library Director), William Darr, Lois (Bea) Mayhue, and Linda Hearing of the Grace Schools' library staff; Clarence MacNeil; and Abraham Labiano, Jane Nelson, Shirley Short, Mary Schimmels of the Billy Graham Center staff. James Stambaugh, Director of the Museum, aided in almost every aspect of the project from transporting the records to designing the cover of the original guide to the microfilm edition.

Several boxes of material included in the items loaned to Grace Schools by the Assembly were not included in the Sunday collection because their connection to the Sundays was slight or because their identification was uncertain. These boxes include: newspaper clippings duplicate to those in the collection; a newspaper clipping containing recipes, dress patterns, anecdotes, epigrams, etc.; form letters and printed reports sent out by Christian institutions; birthday cards, Christmas cards, anniversary cards, etc.; unidentified photographs; and a set of Red Cross scrapbooks which may have been given to Sunday during or shortly after World War I.

No accession number.
1978
Robert Shuster

June 28, 1994
Robert Shuster
J. Archer
M. Larson



PARTIAL LIST OF THE CAMPAIGNS OF WILLIAM ASHLEY SUNDAY
(Dates are often only approximations)
(Web page note: The meetings listed below are ones for which there is some infgormation in the collection. A different listing of Sunday's preaching and speaking engagements cane be found at another website by clicking here.)

Place Dates
Garner, IA January 8-15, 1896
Sigourney, IA January 17-ca. February 6, 1896
Pawnee, NE 1896
Salem and Charleston, IN January-February, 1898
Oneida, IL 1898
Bedford, IA January, 1900
Dundee, IL May-June, 1900
Afton, IA March 6-27, 1901
Perry, IA 1901
Corydon, IA 1901 (?)
Grundy Center 1901
Leon, IA 1901 (?)
Audubon, IA January, 1902
Atlantic, IA ca. February, 1902
Wheaton, IL May, 1902
Maryville, MO 1902 (?)
Woodstock, NY (?) 1902 (?)
Peoria, IL October, 1903
Jefferson, IA December, 1903-January 3, 1904
Marshall, MN January-February, 1904
Sterling, IL 1904 (?)
Rockford, IL 1904 (?)
Elgin, IL 1904 (?)
Carthage, IL 1904 (?)
Bedford, IA 1904 (?)
Seymour, IA 1904 (?)
Centerville, IA 1904 (?)
Harlan, IA 1904 (?)
Exira, IA 1904 (?)
Keokuk, IA October 5-November 5, 1904
Pontiac, IL November 5-December 5, 1904
Redwood Falls, MN December 10, 1904-January 9, 1905
Mason City, IA 1905 (?)
Dixon, IL February-March, 1905
Canon City, CO March 26-April 23, 1905
Macomb, IL April 29-May 28, 1905
Canton, IL 1905
Rantoul, IL 1905
Aledo, IL 1905
Burlington, IA November 9-December 17, 1905
Rochester, MN December 28, 1905-January 29, 1906
Princeton, IL February 11-March 17, 1906
Austin, MN March, 1906
Freeport, IL 1906
Prophetstown, IL 1906
Salida, CO September 22-October 21, 1906
Kewanee, IL 1906 (?)
Worthington, MN 1906 (?)
Kankakee, IL 1906 (?)
Murphysboro, IL 1907 (?)
Fairfield, IA 1907 (?)
Knoxville, IA 1907 (?)
Gibson City, IL 1907 (?)
Galesburg, IL September 28-November 4 1907
Muscatine, IA November 10-December 15, 1907
Bloomington, IL December 27, 1907-February 3, 1908
Decatur, IL February 7-March 17, 1908
Charlestown, IL 1908
Sharon, PA May-June, 1908
Jacksonville, IL September 25-November 5, 1908
Ottumwa, IA November 6-December 16, 1908
Spokane, WA December 25, 1908-February, 1909
Springfield, IL 1909
Marshalltown, IA 1909
Boulder, CO September 5-October 10, 1909
Cedar Rapids, IA October 29-November 21, 1909
Youngstown, OH January-February, 1910
Danville, IL February, 1910
Bellingham, WA April 23-May 29, 1910
Everett, WA 1910
New Castle, PA September 18-October 31, 1910
Waterloo, IA November 7-December 19, 1910
Portsmouth, OH January-February, 1911
Lima, OH February 11-March 25, 1911
Toledo, OH April 9-May 21, 1911
Erie, PA May 28-July 9, 1911
Springfield, OH September 24-November 5, 1911
Wichita, KS November 12-December 25, 1911
Canton, OH December 31, 1911-February 11, 1912
Wheeling, WV February 18-March 31, 1912
Fargo, ND April-May, 1912
Beaver Falls, PA May 16-June 24, 1912
East Liverpool, OH September 15-October 27, 1912
McKeesport, PA November 3-December 14, 1912
Columbus, OH December 29, 1912-February 16, 1913
Willkes Barre, PA February 22, 1913
South Bend, IN April 27-June 15, 1913
Steubenville, OH September 14-October 26, 1913
Johnston, PA November 2-December 14, 1913
Pittsburgh, PA December 28, 1913-February 23, 1914
Scranton, PA March 1-April 20, 1914
Huntington, WV April 28-June, 1914
Colorado Springs, CO June-July, 1914
Denver, CO September-October, 1914
Des Moines, IA November-December 20, 1914
Philadelphia, PA January 3-March 20, 1915
Paterson, NJ March 27-May 28, 1915
Omaha, NE September 20-October 24, 1915
Syracuse, NY October 31-December 19, 1915
Trenton, NJ January-February 21, 1916
Baltimore, MD February 2-April 23, 1916
Kansas City, MO April 30-June 18, 1916
Detroit, MI September 10-November 6, 1916
Boston, MA November 2, 1916-January 21, 1917
Buffalo, NY January 28-March 25, 1917
New York, NY April 8-June 19, 1917
Los Angeles, CA September-October, 1917
Atlanta, GA November-December, 1917
Washington, DC January 6-February, 1918
Chicago, IL March 10-May 19, 1918
Duluth, MN May 26-June, 1918
Providence, RI September 22-November 3, 1918
Fort Worth, TX November-December, 1918
Richmond, VA January 12-February 23, 1919
St. Augustine, FL March, 1919
Tampa, FL April-May, 1919
Davenport, IA September-October, 1919
Chattanooga, TN November-December, 1919
Norfolk, VA January-February, 1920
Syracuse, NY March 5-14, 1920
Bristol, VA March-April, 1920
Oklahoma City, OK May-June, 1920
Roanoke, VA September 19-October 31, 1920
Jacksonville, FL November-December, 1920
Fairmont, WV January-February, 1921
Daytona Beach, FL February 17, 1921
Cincinnati, OH March 6-May 1, 1921
Bluefield, WV May-June, 1921
Norton, VA June-July, 1921
Sioux City, IA September-October, 1921
Tulsa, OK November-December, 1921
Spartanburg, SC January-February, 1922
Charleston, WV March-April, 1922
Richmond, IN May-June, 1922
Morristown, TN June, 1922
Lynchburg, VA September-October, 1922
Dayton, OH November-December, 1922
Knoxville, TN January-February, 1923
Columbia, SC March-April, 1923
Louisville, KY April-May, 1923
Logan, WV May-June, 1923
Beckley, WV June-July, 1923
Niagara Falls, NY September-October, 1923
Charleston, SC November-December, 1923
Charlotte, NC January-February, 1924
Shreveport, LA March-April, 1924
Memphis, TN May-June, 1924
Elmira, NY September-October, 1924
Nashville, TN November-December, 1924
Jackson, MS December 28, 1924-February 1, 1925
Memphis, TN February, 1925
Newport News, VA March-April, 1925
Winston-Salem, NC May-June, 1925
Portland, OR September-October, 1925
Williamsport, PA November-December, 1925
Binghamton, NY January-February, 1926
Cape Girardeau, MO March-April, 1926
Staunton, VA May-June, 1926
Monmouth, IL September-October, 1926
Yakima, WA November-December, 1926
Mobile, AL January-February, 1927
Tampa, FL March-April, 1927
Denver, CO April 7, 1927
Aurora, IL April 10-May 22, 1927
Bangor, MA May 29-July, 1927 (six weeks)
West Frankfurt, IL October-November, 1927
Petersburg, IN December, 1927
St. Louis, MO January-February, 1928
Iola, KS March-April, 1928
Greenville, NC May-June, 1928
Madisonville, KY September 16-October 27, 1928
East Liverpool, OH November-December, 1928
Elyria, OH January-February, 1929
Corpus Christi, TX March-April, 1929
Sterling, CO May-June, 1929
Coffeyville, KS September 15-October 27, 1929
Dodge City, KS November 3-December 15, 1929
Evansville, KS January-February, 1930
Wichita, KS February, 1930
Philadelphia, PA March, 1930
Mt. Holly, NJ April 13-May 18, 1930
Detroit, MI 1930
Charles Town, WV 1930
Huntington, WV 1930
Ironton, OH 1930
Upland, IN 1930
Chicago, IL 1930
Vineland, NJ 1930
Newark, NJ 1930
Lancaster, PA 1930
Cleveland, OH October 20, 1930
Hutchinson, NY November 9-December 4, 1930
Los Angeles, CA January 25, 1931
Boston, MA February 17-March 1, 1931
Buffalo, NY 1931
San Diego, CA 1931
Dayton Beach, FL 1931
Chattanooga, TN 1931
West Palm Beach, FL 1931
Washington, DC April 7, 1931
Boston, MA 1931
Harrisburg, PA 1931
Franklin, PA 1931
New Haven, CT 1931
Livingston, MT October, 1931
Havre, MT 1931
Canton, OH November, 1931
Altoona, PA 1932
Buffalo, NY 1932
Youngstown, OH 1932
Pittsburgh, PA 1932
Franklin, PA 1932
Baltimore, MD 1932
Harrisburg, PA 1932
Shamokin, PA 1932
Johnstown, PA 1932
Des Moines, IA January 15, 1933 (four weeks)
Buffalo, NY 1933
Millbrook, NY 1933
Portland, OR 1933
Wheeling, WV 1933
Erie, PA October 22-30, 1933
Evansville, IN 1933
Philadelphia, PA 1933
Cape Girardeau, MO 1933
New York Churches January 7, 1934
Paterson, NJ 1934
New West Brighton, NY 1934
Brooklyn, NY 1934
Elizabeth, NJ 1934
Brooklyn, NY 1934
Minneapolis, MN 1934
Fort Wayne, IN 1934
Sioux City, IA 1934
Peoria, IL May 20-June 3, 1934
Detroit, MI 1934
Millbrook, NY 1934
Springfield, IL 1934
Nappanee, IN 1934
Sioux Falls, SD 1934
Portland, OR 1934
Big Rapids, MI 1934
Bronx, New York City, NY 1934
Houston, TX 1934
Selma, CA 1934
Los Angeles, CA 1934
Decatur, IL 1935
Chicago, IL 1935
LaGrange, IL 1935
Smyrna, DE 1935
Tampa, FL 1935
Daytona Beach, FL 1935
Springfield, IL 1935
Meriden, CT 1935
Indianapolis, IN 1935
Knoxville, TN April 10-21, 1935
Cleveland, TN 1935
Chattanooga, TN April 28-May 18, 1935
Kansas City, MO 1935
Millbrook, NY 1935
Columbus, OH 1935
Mishawaka, IN 1935

*****
PARTIAL LIST OF SUNDAY'S ASSISTANTS
Dates of Service are often only approximations

NAME TASKS DATES OF SERVICE
B.D. Ackley Pianist 1908-1915
Edith Anderson Singer ?
William Asher Bible teacher, advance organizer 1911-1921
Virginia Asher Director of extension work; Director business women's work 1911-1927
George Ashley Brewster Pianist and soloist 1916-1917
Elijah Brown 1906-1907
Charles Butler Singer 1907-1908
William Butterfield Tabernacle custodian 1918
John Cardiff Assistant to Mr. Sunday 1912-1917
Harry Clarke Song Leader 1932-1935
Mrs. Connett Soloist 1905
Otis G. Dale Business manager 1918
George G. Dowey Director men's Bible study classes 1918
Rose Fetteroffs High school work 1916
Fred Fischer Song leader 1900-1910
Mrs. Fred Fischer Singer 1907
Alice Gamlin Director of boys' and girls' work 1916-1917
Albert Price Gill Architect, advance man 1907-1910
Homer Hammontree Choir director 1927-1929
Mr. and Mrs. Harper 1907
I.E. Honeywell Secretary, associate evangelist 1904-1917
Florence Kinney Director student work, Director of business women's work, pianist, Bible teacher 1917-1930
Jean Lamont Assistant Bible teacher 1917
Hugh Laughlin Song leader 1912
John Linden Assistant, director of men's work 1909-1918
Willis Locke Tabernacle custodian 1929-1930
A.B. MacDonald Men's work assistant 1917
Anna MacLaren Vocalist 1909-1916
Robert Matthews Pianist, private secretary 1916-1930
Francis Miller Bible class teacher, Director of business women's work 1906-1917
Rae Muirhead Bible worker 1908-1909
French Oliver Song leader ?
L.K. Peacock General manager of campaigns ?
Albert Peterson Tabernacle custodian, advance representative 1916-1930
Roy Peterson Tabernacle custodian 1927
Harland H. Pitzer 1918-1920
Clifton Pryor Pledger Assistant 1908-1909
Fred W. Rapp Advance organizer, Business manager 1920-1924
Homer Rodeheaver Song leader, choir director 1908-1927
Alvin W. Roper Pianist 1918
Grace Saxe Bible teacher 1911-1921
Fred Siebert Personal worker 1905-1915
Joseph Spiece Custodian, builder 1906-1918
Mrs. F. R. Stover Assistant student work 1922
Melvin E. Trotter Assistant 1907
James E. Walker Advance representative 1917
Issac Ward Director of men's work, shop work 1916-1917
John Wallace Welsh Advance man 1916
Florence K. Whitbeck Reservations secretary 1917-1918


*****
PARTIAL LIST OF SERMON MANUSCRIPTS AND OUTLINES IN THE
COLLECTION

Box Folder Title
31 3 Acts 11:26
9 2 Acts 16:31; n.d.
31 6 Advertising
8 After Death, Judgment
9 4 After Dinner Talk; n.d.
31 13 Among the Mightiest Pleas
7 Amusements
9 3 Amusements; n.d.
31 13 And He Arose and Followed Him
8 And He Said Tomorrow
31 8 And Nothing
9 5 Andrew; 1922
8 Atonement
9 6 Atonement; n.d.
31 16 Atonement
31 12 Atonement
9 7 Backslider; n.d.
31 17 Backsliding
9 8 Bankers; ca. 1934
9 9 Barabas; n.d.
31 11 Be Sure Sins Will Find You Out
31 18 Being in Agony
9 10 Belief in Immortality; n.d.
9 11 The Bible; n.d.
9 12 Boomerangs; n.d.
7 Booze or Get on the Wagon
9 13 Booze sermon; 1935 (Click to link to a Web page with an online audio file of a version of this sermon)
9 14 Broken Altars; n.d.
9 15 Butterfly Chasers; ca. 1913
31 5 Cast Your Net on Right Side of Ship
31 13 Cast Your Net on Right Side of Ship
6 Chickens Come Home to Roost
9 16 Chickens Come Home to Roost; n.d.
9 17 Choose Ye This Day; n.d.
31 3 Cleansing Temple
9 18 Compassion; n.d.
31 5 Conversion
31 19 The Conversion of Matthew
9 19 David's Little Place; ca. 1913
31 21 David's Little Place
9 20 The Devil; n.d.
7 Devil's Boomerang or Hot Cakes off the Griddle
31 10 Dictator
8 Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
7 Elder Brother
9 21 The Elder Brother; n.d.
31 22 The Elder Brother
31 23 End
31 9 End
31 24 Excuses
31 25 Faith
31 11 The Fashions World Passeth
9 22 Fault; n.d.
7 Feeding the Five Thousand
9 23 The Feeding of the Five Thousand; n.d.
9 25 Fervent Effectual Prayer; n.d.
9 24 A Few Thoughts on Acts Three; n.d.
31 4 57 Reasons
9 26 Fighting Saints; n.d.
31 4 Find No Fault
7 Fir Tree
31 20 I Cor. 15:57
31 2 Fishers of Men (Mark 1:16)
7 Fishing on the Wrong Side
9 27 Flag of Our Fathers; n.d.
31 12 Fodder
8 Following Christ
31 6 Following Christ
9 28 Forces That Win; n.d.
31 26 Galatians 2:20
31 27 Get on the Water Wagon
9 29 Girding Ourselves with Courage for the New Year; 1931
9 30 God Commands All Men Everywhere to Repent; n.d.
7 God Commands All Men to Repent
7 God's Detective
8 God's Promise
8 Gospel Plan
9 31 Gospel Plan; n.d.
9 32 Heaven; 1931
31 28 Hebrews 13:8
31 10 Hebrews 13:8
9 33 Hebrews 19:12-14; n.d.
31 13 Here We Are Midst Plenty
9 34 Herodias; n.d.
8 Hidden Among Stuff
9 35 Hidden Among the Stuff; n.d.
8 His Name Shall Be Called Wonderful
31 29 Holy Spirit
9 36 Homes; n.d.
31 9 Hope
31 13 Hope
8 How Shall We Escape If We Neglect So Great Salvation
9 37 How Shall We Escape; n.d.
31 9 How Shall We Escape
31 11 How Shall We Escape
31 4 The Hour Is Come
7 I Find No Fault in Him
9 38 If Any Man Will; n.d.
31 30 If Any Man Will
9 39 If Christ Came To ---; n.d.
7 If Christ Came to New York
7 If Ye Love Me, Keep My Commandments
31 2 Illuminated Memories
9 40 Incarnation; n.d.
8 Incarnation of Christ
8 Inner Wall
9 41 The Inner Wall; n.d.
9 42 Is It Nothing to Thee; n.d.
8 Is It Well With Thee
9 43 Is It Well With Thee; n.d.
31 13 Is It Well With Thee
9 44 Isaiah 66:8; n.d.
31 31 It Pays to Do Right
9 45 Jacob; n.d.
31 32 Jacob
9 46 Jekyll-Hyde; n.d.
31 33 Jekyll-Hyde
31 8 Jesus Is the Same Yesterday, Today, and Forever
9 47 Job; n.d.
31 34 John 3:16
9 49 John 3:16; n.d.
9 48 John 7:17; n.d.
9 50 Joint Heirship; n.d.
9 51 The Judgment; n.d.
31 35 The Judgement
7 Keep Your Servant from Presumptuous Sin
9 52 The Kingdom; n.d.
31 8 The Kingdom
31 4 Knock
9 53 Last Word; 1920
7 Lawyer's Question
9 54 Lawyer's Question; n.d.
9 55 Leper; n.d.
8 A Lesson from Solomon
7 Let Your Light So Shine
31 36 Let Your Light Shine
31 7 Let Your Light Shine
9 56 Liberalism; n.d.
31 37 Liberalism
9 57 Liberty Loan; ca. 1917-1918
9 58 Lincoln; n.d.
8 Look to Yourselves
31 38 Lost World
7 Love Your Enemies
31 7 Luke 6:6
31 2 Luke 6:46
9 59 Luke 11:1; n.d.
9 60 Luke 5; n.d.
8 Man Without A Soul
9 61 Man Without a Soul; n.d.
9 62 Martha and Mary; n.d.
31 3 Martha-Mary
31 39 Matthew 7:2
9 63 The Mercies of God; n.d.
9 64 Micah; n.d.
31 8 Micah
31 13 Midst Years - Contemporary Jer..
9 65 Mighty Man; n.d.
7 Mighty Man Who Cannot Save
31 40 Mighty Men
31 41 Mind Work
7 Moral Leper
31 42 Mother's Sermon
9 66 Motherhood; n.d.
9 67 Nathan and David; n.d.
9 68 Newspapermen's Talk; ca. 1917
9 69 No Man Cared; n.d.
31 9 No Man Cared
7 No Second Chance
31 43 No Second Chance
31 3 No. 2 - Personal Work
7 Nuts for Skeptics
9 70 Nuts for Skeptics to Crack; n.d.
31 13 Nuts for Skeptics
9 71 Objections Answered; n.d.
31 44 Objections Answered
9 72 On God's Line of Battle; n.d.
6 Opportunity and Responsibility
9 73 Parable of the Pounds; n.d.
31 6 Pasco Goard
9 74 Patriotic; ca. 1918
7 Paul's Conversion
9 75 Paul's Teachings; n.d.
9 76 People Had Mind to Work; ca. 1924
31 3 Personal Work
9 77 Pharisee--Publican; n.d.
31 3 Pharisee-Publican
31 10 Poison Peddlers
7 Poor Man's Cry
9 78 A Poor Man's Cry; n.d.
9 79 Positive and Negative Religion; n.d.
8 Potter and the Clay
31 7 Potter and the Clay
7 Power of Confession
9 80 Power of Confessions; n.d.
9 81 Prison Talk; ca. 1913
9 82 Promise of God; n.d.
31 8 Promises of God
31 3 Proverbs 11:30
9 83 Psalm 19:13; n.d.
9 84 Psalm 50:14; n.d.
8 Reasonableness of Christianity
31 4 Reasons
31 18 Remember Your Creator
9 85 Repent; n.d.
31 11 Repent
31 45 Revelation 7:17
9 86 Revival; n.d.
31 3 Revival
31 6 Revival
9 87 Revival at Pentecost; n.d.
31 46 Rewards
31 9 Rewards
8 Rich Man
31 5 Rich Man
8 Rich Young Ruler
31 5 Rich Young Ruler
31 12 Romans 12:1 (Mercies of God)
9 88 Samson; n.d.
31 13 Samson
9 89 School; n.d.
9 90 Second Coming; n.d.
31 6 Second Coming
31 10 Second Coming
7 Second Coming of Christ
9 92 II Timothy 2:15; n.d.
31 8 II Timothy 2:15
9 91 II Timothy 3:17; n.d.
7 Secret of Failure
31 45 Secret of Failure
7 Seek Ye the Lord
9 93 Seek Ye the Lord; n.d.
31 48 Seek Ye the Lord
8 Show Thyself a Man
9 95 Sins Find Out; n.d.
31 13 Solomon
9 96 Son of Man; n.d.
31 12 Son of Man
9 97 Sunset; 1920
31 5 Sunset
9 98 Taking Our Bearings
31 5 Taking Our Bearings
9 99 Temptations of Christ
9 100 The Ten Commandments; n.d.
9 101 Thanks Be Unto God; n.d.
31 50 They Cried You are the Devil
31 51 They Need Not Depart Give Ye Them to Eat
7 Think on These Things
9 102 Think on These Things; n.d.
31 5 Thou Shalt Be Missed
9 103 Thou Art Not Far From the Kingdom; n.d.
31 12 Thou Art Not Far From the Kingdom
31 4 Three Crosses
9 104 Three Great Things; n.d.
31 52 Three Great Things
9 105 The Three Groups; n.d.
31 53 Three Groups
7 Thy Kingdom Come
9 106 Thy Kingdom Come; n.d.
31 12 Timid Women
31 13 Timid Women
9 107 To Converts; n.d.
9 108 Tomorrow; n.d.
7 Trail of the Serpent
31 54 Trail Serpent
9 109 The Twenty-third Psalm
9 110 Two Beggars; n.d.
31 5 Two Beggars
7 Two Kinds of Religion
31 55 The Unpardonable Sin
31 12 The Unpardonable Sin
31 6 Under the Son
9 112 Under the Sun; n.d.
9 113 Uzziah, the Fool; n.d.
9 111 Vision; n.d.
31 6 Visions
9 114 War; n.d.
8 What Must I Do to Be Saved
31 55 What Must I Do To Be Saved
31 9 What Must I Do To Be Saved
9 115 What Shall I Then Do with Jesus; n.d.
31 57 What Shall I Do Then With Jesus
6 Where There Is No Vision the People Perish
9 116 What Think Ye of Christ; n.d.
9 117 When I Receive Invitation; n.d.
9 118 Where Did We Get the Bible; n.d.
8 Who Was Jesus
9 119 Who Was Jesus; n.d.
9 120 Why; n.d.
9 121 Why Can't We Cast Him Out; n.d.
6 Why Could Not Cast Out Devils
9 122 Why Girls Go Wrong; n.d.
10 1 Why Some Men Fail in Ministry
10 2 Why Stand Ye Here All Day Idle
31 58 Why the Disciples Failed
31 10 Wicked and Adulterous Generation
10 3 Wist Not Lord Depart from Hezj
10 4 With What Measure Ye Mete It Shall...
31 3 Witnesses
31 59 Women
31 13 Women
31 9 Women Possess Keen Intuitive Sense
10 5 Women's Sermon
31 9 Wonderful
8 Worth of God's Way
6 Ye Must Be Born Again
9 94 Young People, Sermon to




LOCATION RECORD
Accession:
Type of Material: Microfilm


For each item listed below, there are a master negative and two positive reels one of which is in the CENTER LIBRARY MICROFILM ROOM:

Reel 1 - Box 1; Folders 1-29

Reel 2 - Box 1; Folders 30-44 and Box 2; Folders 1-24

Reel 3 - Box 2; Folders 25-57

Reel 4 - Box 2; Folders 58-74

Reel 5 - Box 3; Folders 1-25

Reel 6 - Box 3; Folders 26-32

Reel 7 - Box 3; Folders 33-37 and Box 4; Folders 1-32

Reel 8 - Box 4; Folders 33-60

Reel 9 - Box 5; Folders 1-60 and Box 6; April 8-18, 1917

Reel 10 - Box 6; April 19-May 3, 1917 and Box 7; May 3-15; 1917

Reel 11 - Box 7; May 16-26, 1917 and Box 8; May 27-June 12, 1917

Reel 12 - Box 8; June 13-17; 1917 and Box 9; Folders 1-41

Reel 13 - Box 9; Folders 42-104

Reel 14 - Box 9; Folders 105-122

Reel 15 - Box 10; Folders 1-20

Reel 16 - Box 10; Folders 21-35

Reel 17 - Box 11; Folders 1-7

Reel 18 - Box 11; Folders 8-12

Reel 19 - Box 12; Folders 1-52

Reel 20 - Box 13; Folders 1-67

Reel 21 - Scrapbooks 1-5

Reel 22 - Scrapbooks 6-7

Reel 23 - Scrapbooks 8-10

Reel 24 - Scrapbooks 11-13

Reel 25 - Scrapbooks 14-16

Reel 26 - Scrapbooks 17-19 and some tabernacle blueprints

Reel 27 - Box 31; Folders 1-10

Reel 28 - Box 31; Folders 11-59

Reel 29 - Box 32 (Scrapbook)


*****

LOCATION RECORD
Accession:
Type of material: Negatives

The following items are located in the NEGATIVE FILE; request by Folder Titles (in bold) at the beginning of each entry below. All the negatives are black and white, unless otherwise noted.

SUNDAY, WILLIAM ASHLEY-NEGATIVE NOTEBOOK: Sixty-four pages of b/w, 35mm negatives, most pages with 35 or 36 images a page. Each page represents one roll of film. The negatives are of the original photographs in William and Helen Sunday Collection the custody (as of 1978) of the Grace College and Seminary Library in Winona Lake, Indiana. There is a separate box, stored with the photographic proof sheets, that contains photocopies of any information that was on the back of each original photograph. Most photos contained no information whatever on the back. The images are described more fully in section VIII of the scope and content note and container list of this guide. The negatives were made in 1978 by the BGC staff.


*****

LOCATION RECORD
Accession:
Type of material: Photographs

The following items are located in the PHOTO FILE; request by folder title (in bold) at the beginning of each entry below.

SUNDAY, WILLIAM ASHLEY-PHOTO NOTEBOOK: Sixty-four pages of b/w, 35mm proof sheets, most pages with 35 or 36 images a page. Each page represents one reel of film, The proof sheets are of the original photographs in William and Helen Sunday Collection the custody (as of 1978) of the Grace College and Seminary Library in Winona Lake, Indiana. With each proof sheet is a list indicating the box and folder location for each individual image on the sheets. There is a separate box, stored with the proof sheets, that contains photocopies of any information that was on the back of each original photograph. Most photos contained no information whatever on the back. The images on the proof sheets are described more fully in section VIII of the scope and content note and container list of this guide. Proofsheets were made in 1978 by the BGC staff.


CONTAINER LIST

Box Folder Item
I. William A. Sunday, General Correspondence
1 1 No date
1 2 1888
1 3 1890
1 4 1891
1 5 1892
1 6 1894
1 7 1895
1 8 1896
1 9 1897
1 10 1898
1 11 1901
1 12 1903
1 13 1904
1 14 1905
1 15 1906
1 16 1907
1 17 1908
1 18 1909
1 19 1910
1 20 1911
1 21 1912
1 22 1913
1 23 1914
1 24 1915
1 25 1916
1 26 1917
1 27 1918
1 28 1919
1 29 1920
1 30 1921
1 31 1922
1 32 1923
1 33 1924
1 34 1925
1 35 1926
1 36 1927
1 37 1928
1 38 1929
1 39 1930
1 40 1931
1 41 1932
1 42 1933
1 43 1934
1 44 1935
II. Helen T. Sunday, General Correspondence
2 1 No date
2 2 1888
2 3 1890
2 4 1894
2 5 1895
2 6 1896
2 7 1897
2 8 1898
2 9 1899
2 10 1901
2 11 1902
2 12 1903
2 13 1904
2 14 1905
2 15 1906
2 16 1907
2 17 1908
2 18 1910
2 19 1911
2 20 1912
2 21 1913
2 22 1914
2 23 1915
2 24 1916
2 25 1917
2 26 1918
2 27 1919
2 28 1920
2 29 1921
2 30 1922
2 31 1923
2 32 1924
2 33 1925
2 34 1926
2 35 1927
2 36 1928
2 37 1929
2 38 1930
2 39 1931
2 40 1932
2 41 1933
2 42 1934
2 43 January - October, 1935
2 44 November 1-7, 1935
2 45 November 8, 1935
2 46 November 9, 1935
2 47 November 10, 1935
2 48 November 11, 1935
2 49 November 12, 1935
2 50 November 13, 1935
2 51 November 14-30, 1935
2 52 December, 1935; no date, 1935
2 53 1936
2 54 1937
2 55 1938
2 56 1939
2 57 1940
2 58 1941
2 59 1942
2 60 1943
2 61 1944
2 62 1945
2 63 1946
2 64 1947
2 65 1948
2 66 1949
2 67 1950
2 68 1951
2 69 1952
2 70 1953
2 71 1954
2 72 1955
2 73 1956
2 74 1957
III. Sunday Family Correspondence
3 1 Unknown; No date
3 2 Helen Sunday Haines; No date
3 3 Mark Haines; No date
3 4 Paul Haines; No date
3 5 Ross Hamilton; No date
3 6 George M. Sunday, Sr.; No date
3 7 George M. Sunday, Jr.; No date
3 8 Harold Edward Sunday; No date
3 9 Harriet Mason Sunday; No date
3 10 Helen Thompson Sunday; No date
3 11 Lillian Sunday; No date
3 12 Lurlyne Sunday; No date
3 13 Nina Sunday; No date
3 14 Paul Sunday; No date
3 15 Renee Sunday; No date
3 16 Toni Sunday; No date
3 17 William Sunday, Sr.; No date
3 18 William Sunday, Jr.; No date
3 19 Ada Thompson; No date
3 20 Jennie Thompson; No date
3 21 Kate Thompson; No date
3 22 1886
3 23 1887
3 24 1888; No date
3 25 January, 1888
3 26 February, 1888
3 27 March, 1888
3 28 April, 1888
3 29 May, 1888
3 30 June 1-15, 1888
3 31 June 15-30, 1888
3 32 July, 1888
3 33 August, 1888
3 34 September, 1888
3 35 October, 1888
3 36 November, 1888
3 37 December, 1888
4 1 1889
4 2 1890
4 3 1892
4 4 1894
4 5 1896
4 6 1897
4 7 1899
4 8 1901
4 9 1902
4 10 1903
4 11 1906
4 12 1907
4 13 1908
4 14 1909
4 15 1910
4 16 1911
4 17 1912
4 18 1913
4 19 1914-1915
4 20 1916
4 21 1917
4 22 1918
4 23 1920
4 24 1921
4 25 1922
4 26 1923
4 27 1924
4 28 1925
4 29 1926
4 30 1927
4 31 1928
4 32 1929
4 33 1930
4 34 1931
4 35 1932
4 36 1933
4 37 1934
4 38 1935
4 39 1936
4 40 1937
4 41 1938
4 42 1939
4 43 1940
4 44 1941
4 45 1942
4 46 1943
4 47 1944
4 48 1945
4 49 1946
4 50 1947
4 51 1948
4 52 1949
4 53 1950
4 54 1951
4 55 1952
4 56 1953
4 57 1954
4 58 1955
4 59 1956
4 60 1976
IV. Evangelistic Campaign Files
5 1 Genesco, IL; No date
5 2 Spokane Crusade, Spokane, WA; December 25, 1908-February, 1909
5 3 Boulder, CO; September-October, 1909
5 4 Waterloo Campaign, Waterloo, IA; November-December, 1910
5 5 Springfield Evangelistic Campaign, Springfield, OH; September-November, 1911
5 6 Billy Sunday Evangelistic Company of Lima, OH; February-March, 1911
5 7 Erie Evangelistic Association, Erie, PA; May-June, 1911
5 8 Tri-State Evangelistic Association, East Liverpool, OH; September-October, 1912
5 9 Wilkes-Barre Campaign, Wilkes-Barre, PA; February-April, 1913
5 10 William A. Sunday Evangelistic Campaign of Steubenville, OH; September 14-October 26, 1913
5 11 Coremaugh Valley Evangelistic Association, Johnstown, PA; November-December, 1913
5 12 Pittsburgh Evangelistic Campaign, Pittsburgh, PA; December 1913-February 1914
5 13 Scranton Campaign, Scranton, PA; March-April, 1914
5 14 Denver Evangelistic Campaign Association, Denver, CO; September-October, 1914
5 15 Philadelphia Evangelistic Campaign, Philadelphia, PA; January-March, 1915
5 16 Paterson and North Jersey Evangelistic Campaign, Paterson, NJ; March-May, 1915
5 17 Syracuse Campaign, Syracuse, NY; October-December, 1915
5 18 Trenton Evangelistic Association Campaign, Trenton, NJ; January-February, 1916
5 19 Baltimore Campaign, Baltimore, MD; February-April, 1916
5 20 Kansas City Campaign, Kansas City, MO; April-June, 1916
5 21 Detroit Sunday Evangelistic Campaign, Detroit, MI; September-November, 1916
5 22 Boston Sunday Evangelistic Campaign, Boston, MA; November 1916-January, 1917
5 23 Buffalo Evangelistic Association, Buffalo, NY; January-March, 1917
5 24 The William A. Sunday Evangelistic Committee of New York City; April-June, 1917
5 25 Los Angeles Campaign, Los Angeles, CA; September-October, 1917
5 26 Atlanta Campaign, Atlanta, GA; November-December, 1917
5 27 Washington Sunday Campaign, Washington, DC; January-February, 1918
5 28 Chicago Campaign, Chicago, IL; March-May, 1918
5 29 Duluth Campaign, Duluth, MN; May-June, 1918
5 30 Providence Sunday Campaign, Providence, RI; September-November, 1918
5 31 Fort Worth Campaign, Fort Worth, TX; November-December, 1918
5 32 Richmond Campaign, Richmond, VA; January-February, 1919
5 33 Chattanooga Campaign, Chattanooga, TN; November-December, 1919
5 34 Norfolk and Portsmouth Campaign, Norfolk and Portsmouth, VA; January-February, 1920
5 35 Bristol Campaign, Bristol, VA; March-April, 1920
5 36 Oklahoma City Campaign, Oklahoma City, OK; May-June, 1920
5 37 Roanoke Campaign, Roanoke, VA; September 19-October 31, 1920
5 38 Fairmont Evangelistic Campaign, Fairmont, WV; January-February, 1921
5 39 Greater Cincinnati Evangelistic Campaign, Cincinnati, OH; March-May,1921
5 40 Bluefield and Vicinity Evangelistic Campaign, Bluefield, WV; May-June, 1921
5 41 Wise County Evangelistic Campaign, Norton, VA; June-July, 1921
5 42 Spartanburg Campaign, Spartanburg, SC; January-February, 1922
5 43 Charleston Evangelistic Campaign, Charleston, WV; March-April, 1922
5 44 Lynchburg and Vicinity Evangelistic Campaign, Lynchburg, VA; September-October, 1922
5 45 Dayton Evangelistic Campaign, Dayton, OH; November-December, 1922
5 46 Louisville Campaign, Louisville, KY; April-May, 1923
5 47 Shreveport Campaign, Shreveport, LA; March-April, 1924
5 48 Elmira Evangelistic Campaign, Elmira, NY; September-October, 1924
5 49 Denver, CO; April 7, 1927
5 50 Aurora Evangelistic Campaign, Aurora, IL; April 10-May 22, 1927
5 51 Coffeyville Evangelistic Campaign, Coffeyville, KS; September-October, 1929
5 52 Dodge City Evangelistic Campaign, Dodge City, KS; November-December, 1929
5 53 Mount Holly and Vicinity, Mt. Holley, NJ; April 13-May 18, 1930
5 54 Cleveland, OH; October 20, 1930
5 55 Los Angeles, CA; January 25, 1931
5 56 Washington, DC; April 7, 1931
5 57 Canton Campaign, Canton, OH; 1931 (?)
5 58 Des Moines, IA; 1932 (?)
5 59 Detroit, MI; 1934
5 60 Peoria Campaign, Peoria, IL; May 20-June 3, 1934
V. Sermons, etc.; 1891-1949, n.d.
Listed below are the stenographic copies of the New York City Campaign sermons contained in boxes 6,7 and 8
6 4/08/17 Sunday Afternoon; Introductory remarks
6 4/08/17 Evening
6 4/10/17 Afternoon
6 4/10/17 Afternoon
6 4/10/17 Evening
6 4/10/17 Evening
6 4/11/17 Afternoon
6 4/11/17 Evening
6 4/12/17 Afternoon
6 4/12/17 Night
6 4/13/17 Afternoon
6 4/13/17 Evening
6 4/14/17 Afternoon
6 4/14/17 Night
6 4/15/17 Sunday Afternoon
6 4/15/17 Night
6 4/17/17 Afternoon
6 4/17/17 Night
6 4/18/17 Evening
6 4/19/17 Afternoon
6 4/19/17 Evening
6 4/20/17 Afternoon; Why Could Not Cast Out Devils
6 4/21/17 Afternoon
6 4/21/17 Evening
6 4/22/17 Sunday Afternoon
6 4/22/17 Night
6 4/24/17 Afternoon
6 4/24/17 Night
6 4/25/17 Afternoon
6 4/25/17 Evening
6 4/26/17 Afternoon
6 4/26/17 Night
6 4/27/17 Afternoon
6 4/28/17 Afternoon; Ye Must Be Born Again
6 4/28/17 Evening
6 4/29/17 Sunday Morning; Where There Is No Vision the People Perish
6 4/29/17 Afternoon; Chickens Come Home to Roost
6 5/01/17 Afternoon
6 5/01/17 Evening
6 5/02/17 Afternoon; Opportunity and Responsibility
6 5/02/17 Evening
6 5/03/17 Afternoon
7 5/03/17 Evening; No Second Chance
7 5/04/17 Afternoon; The Secret of Failure
7 5/04/17 Night
7 5/05/17 Afternoon
7 5/05/17 Evening; The Poor Man's Cry
7 5/06/17 Sunday Morning; The Mighty Man Who Cannot Save
7 5/06/17 Afternoon; The Devil's Boomerang or Hot Cakes of the Griddle
7 5/08/17 Afternoon; Let Your Light So Shine
7 5/08/17 Evening
7 5/09/17 Afternoon; The Lawyers Question
7 5/09/17 Evening; I Find No Fault in Him
7 5/10/17 Afternoon; Feeding the Five Thousand
7 5/10/17 Evening; If Christ Came to New York
7 5/11/17 Evening; Think on These Things
7 5/12/17 Afternoon; Talk to Children by Mr. Rodeheaver
7 5/12/17 Afternoon; Talk to Children by Mr. Rodeheaver
7 5/12/17 Night
7 5/13/17 Sunday Morning; Thy Kingdom Come
7 5/13/17 Evening; Booze or Get on the Wagon
7 5/15/17 Afternoon; The Fir Tree
7 5/15/17 Night
7 5/16/17 Afternoon; The Elder Brother
7 5/16/17 Evening
7 5/17/17 Afternoon; Two Kinds of Religion
7 5/17/17 Evening
7 5/18/17 Afternoon; Paul's Conversion
7 5/18/17 Evening; Second Coming of Christ
7 5/19/17 Afternoon
7 5/20/17 Morning; If Ye Love Me, Keep My Commandments
7 5/20/17 Afternoon; The Trail of the Serpent
7 5/20/17 Sunday Evening; The Moral Leper
7 5/22/17 Afternoon; The Power of Confession
7 5/22/17 Evening; God Commands All Men to Repent
7 5/23/17 Afternoon
7 5/23/17 Evening; God's Detective
7 5/24/17 Afternoon; Love Your Enemies
7 5/24/17 Evening; Nuts for Skeptics
7 5/25/17 Afternoon; Keep Your Servant from Presumptuous Sin
7 5/25/17 Evening; Amusements
7 5/26/17 Afternoon; Fishing on the Wrong Side
7 5/26/17 Evening; Seek Ye the Lord
8 5/27/17 Sunday Morning
8 5/27/17 Afternoon
8 5/27/17 Evening; Hidden Among The Stuff
8 5/29/17 Afternoon
8 5/29/17 Evening
8 5/30/17 Afternoon; Who Was Jesus
8 5/30/17 Evening; What Must I Do to Be Saved
8 5/31/17 Afternoon
8 5/31/17 Night; Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
8 6/01/17 Evening; Is It Well With Thee
8 6/02/17 Afternoon; The Rich Young Ruler
8 6/02/17 Night
8 6/03/17 Sunday Morning; His Name Shall Be Called Wonderful
8 6/03/17 Afternoon
8 6/03/17 Evening
8 6/03/17 Evening
8 6/05/17 Afternoon; The Gospel Plan
8 6/05/17 Evening; The Reasonableness of Christianity
8 6/06/17 Afternoon; The Potter and the Clay
8 6/06/17 Evening; The Atonement
8 6/07/17 Afternoon; The Man Without A Soul
8 6/07/17 Evening; The Worth of God's Way
8 6/08/17 Afternoon; The Inner Wall
8 6/08/17 Evening; How Shall We Escape If We Neglect So Great Salvation
8 6/09/17 Afternoon; The Rich Man
8 6/09/17 Evening; A Lesson from Solomon
8 6/10/17 Sunday Morning
8 6/10/17 Afternoon; After Death, Judgment
8 6/12/17 Afternoon; Following Christ
8 6/12/17 Evening
8 6/13/17 Afternoon; God's Promise
8 6/13/17 Evening; The Incarnation of Christ
8 6/14/17 Afternoon
8 6/14/17 Evening
8 6/15/17 Afternoon
8 6/15/17 Evening
8 6/16/17 Afternoon
8 6/16/17 Evening
8 6/17/17 Morning; Look to Yourselves
8 6/17/17 Afternoon; Show Thyself a Man
8 6/17/17 Evening; And He Said Tomorrow
William A. Sunday
9 1 Notes on Bible Reading and Preparing Revivals; 1891-ca.1895
9 2 Acts 16:31; n.d.
9 3 Amusements; n.d.
9 4 After Dinner Talk; n.d.
9 5 Andrew; 1922
9 6 Atonement; n.d.
9 7 Backslider; n.d.
9 8 Bankers; ca. 1934
9 9 Barabas; n.d.
9 10 Belief in Immortality; n.d.
9 11 The Bible; n.d.
9 12 Boomerangs; n.d.
9 13 Booze sermon; 1935
9 14 Broken Altars; n.d.
9 15 Butterfly Chasers; ca. 1913
9 16 Chickens Come Home to Roost; n.d.
9 17 Choose Ye This Day; n.d.
9 18 Compassion; n.d.
9 19 David's Little Place; ca. 1913
9 20 The Devil; n.d.
9 21 The Elder Brother; n.d.
9 22 Fault; n.d.
9 23 The Feeding of the Five Thousand; n.d.
9 24 A Few Thoughts on Acts Three; n.d.
9 25 Fervent Effectual Prayer; n.d.
9 26 Fighting Saints; n.d.
9 27 Flag of Our Fathers; n.d.
9 28 Forces That Win; n.d.
9 29 Girding Ourselves with Courage for the New Year; 1931
9 30 God Commands All Men Everywhere to Repent; n.d.
9 31 Gospel Plan; n.d.
9 32 Heaven; 1931
9 33 Hebrews 19:12-14; n.d.
9 34 Herodias; n.d.
9 35 Hidden Among the Stuff; n.d.
9 36 Homes; n.d.
9 37 How Shall We Escape; n.d.
9 38 If Any Man Will; n.d.
9 39 If Christ Came To; n.d.
9 40 Incarnation; n.d.
9 41 The Inner Wall; n.d.
9 42 Is It Nothing to Thee; n.d.
9 43 Is It Well With Thee; n.d.
9 44 Isaiah 66:8; n.d.
9 45 Jacob; n.d.
9 46 Jekyll-Hyde; n.d.
9 47 Job; n.d.
9 48 John 7:17; n.d.
9 49 John 3:16; n.d.
9 50 Joint Heirship; n.d.
9 51 The Judgment; n.d.
9 52 The Kingdom; n.d.
9 53 Last Word; 1920
9 54 Lawyer's Question; n.d.
9 55 Leper; n.d.
9 56 Liberalism; n.d.
9 57 Liberty Loan; ca. 1917-1918
9 58 Lincoln; n.d.
9 59 Luke 11:1; n.d.
9 60 Luke 5; n.d.
9 61 Man Without a Soul; n.d.
9 62 Martha and Mary; n.d.
9 63 The Mercies of God; n.d.
9 64 Micah; n.d.
9 65 Mighty Man; n.d.
9 66 Motherhood; n.d.
9 67 Nathan and David; n.d.
9 68 Newspapermen's Talk; ca. 1917
9 69 No Man Cared; n.d.
9 70 Nuts for Skeptics to Crack; n.d.
9 71 Objections Answered; n.d.
9 72 On God's Line of Battle; n.d.
9 73 Parable of the Pounds; n.d.
9 74 Patriotic; ca. 1918
9 75 Paul's Teachings; n.d.
9 76 People Had Mind to Work; ca. 1924
9 77 Pharisee--Publican; n.d.
9 78 A Poor Man's Cry; n.d.
9 79 Positive and Negative Religion; n.d.
9 80 Power of Confessions; n.d.
9 81 Prison Talk; ca. 1913
9 82 Promise of God; n.d.
9 83 Psalm 19:13; n.d.
9 84 Psalm 50:14; n.d.
9 85 Repent; n.d.
9 86 Revival; n.d.
9 87 Revival at Pentecost; n.d.
9 88 Samson; n.d.
9 89 School; n.d.
9 90 Second Coming; n.d.
9 91 II Timothy 3:17; n.d.
9 92 II Timothy 2:15; n.d.
9 93 Seek Ye the Lord; n.d.
9 94 Sermon to Young People
9 95 Sins Find Out; n.d.
9 96 Son of Man; n.d.
9 97 Sunset; 1920
9 98 Taking Our Bearings
9 99 Temptations of Christ
9 100 The Ten Commandments; n.d.
9 101 Thanks Be Unto God; n.d.
9 102 Think on These Things; n.d.
9 103 Thou Art Not Far From the Kingdom; n.d.
9 104 Three Great Things; n.d.
9 105 The Three Groups; n.d.
9 106 Thy Kingdom Come; n.d.
9 107 To Converts; n.d.
9 108 Tomorrow; n.d.
9 109 The Twenty-third Psalm
9 110 Two Beggars; n.d.
9 111 Vision; n.d.
9 112 Under the Sun; n.d.
9 113 Uzziah, the Fool; n.d.
9 114 War; n.d.
9 115 What Shall I Then Do with Jesus; n.d.
9 116 What Think Ye of Christ; n.d.
9 117 When I Receive Invitation; n.d.
9 118 Where Did We Get the Bible; n.d.
9 119 Who Was Jesus; n.d.
9 120 Why; n.d.
9 121 Why Can't We Cast Him Out; n.d.
9 122 Why Girls Go Wrong; n.d.
10 1 Why Some Men Fail in Ministry
10 2 Why Stand Ye Here All Day Idle
10 3 Wist Not Lord Depart from Hezj
10 4 With What Measure Ye Mete It Shall...
10 5 Women's Sermon
10 6 Untitled talks on Alcohol and Prohibition; 1919-1933; n.d.
10 7 Untitled talks on Patriotic Topics; 1917-1918; n.d.
10 8 Untitled talks on Religious Topics; 1915-1925; n.d.
10 9 Fragments; 1916-1934; n.d.
10 10 Illustrations, Anecdotes, & Proverbs; 1915-1917
10 11 Statistics on Sermon Results; September-November, 1916
10 12 List of Copyrighted Sermons; 1913
10 13 Tracts given to converts
Love Stories of the Bible; 1917
10 14 Drafts of foreword
10 15 Drafts of the chapter on Adam & Eve
10 16 Draft of the chapter on Abraham and Sarah
10 17 Drafts of the story on Isaac and Rebbeca
10 18 Drafts of the chapter on Jacob and Rachel
10 19 Draft of the chapter on Joseph
10 20 Drafts of the chapter on Samson and Delilah
10 21 Drafts of the chapter on Ruth
10 22 Drafts of the chapter on David and Abigail
10 23 Draft of the chapter on David and Bathsheba
10 24 Drafts of the chapter on Esther
10 25 Drafts of the chapter on Hosea and Gomer
10 26 Drafts of the chapter on Deborah
10 27 Drafts of love stories by ministers written for the Women's Home Companion; ca. 1917
10 28 Drafts for chapter 1 of Attaboy; ca. 1917
10 29 Article for Railway magazine; 1921
10 30 Draft of Autobiographical article; ca. 1931
10 31 Chapter titles for Great Warriors of the Bible; n.d.
10 32 Partial manuscript of The Real Billy Sunday by Elijah P. Brown; ca. 1914
10 33 Devotional manuscript by G.W. Buell (?); n.d.
10 34 Sermon material prepared by A.B. MacDonald
10 35 Sermons and talks not by William A. or Helen T. Sunday; 1896-1935; n.d.
11 1 Sermons by unknown authors; 1894; n.d.
11 2 Sermons by unknown authors; n.d.
Helen A. Sunday
11 3 Ma Sunday's Column; September 1917-March 1918
11 4 Drafts of Ma Sunday's Book to the Women of America; ca. 1918
Ma Sunday's Column
11 5 1917-1918
11 6 1917-1918
11 7 Fragments; 1917-1918
11 8 Draft of True Living; ca. 1918
11 9 Draft of foreword, probably to The Commandment Series; ca. 1918
11 10 Draft manuscript of The Commandment Series; ca. 1918
11 11 Autobiographical Talks; ca. 1936-1949; n.d.
11 12 Helen T. Sunday (?) - fragments; n.d.
VI. Press Clippings
12 1 Undated
12 2 1888
12 3 1892-95 (?)
12 4 1895
12 5 ca. 1897
12 6 1898
12 7 1899
12 8 1900
12 9 1901
12 10 1902
12 11 1904
12 12 1905
12 13 1907
12 14 1908
12 15 1910
12 16 1911
12 17 1912
12 18 1913
12 19 1914
12 20 1915
12 21 1916
12 22 January, 1917
12 23 February, 1917
12 24 March, 1917
12 25 April 8, 1917
12 26 April 9, 1917
12 27 April 10, 1917
12 28 April 11, 1917
12 29 April 12, 1917
12 30 April 13, 1917
12 31 April 14, 1917
12 32 April 15, 1917
12 33 April 16, 1917
12 34 April 17, 1917
12 35 April 18, 1917
12 36 April 19, 1917
12 37 April 20, 1917
12 38 April 21, 1917
12 39 April 22, 1917
12 40 April 23, 1917
12 41 April 24, 1917
12 42 April 25, 1917
12 43 April 26, 1917
12 44 April 27, 1917
12 45 April 28, 1917
12 46 April 29-30, 1917
12 47 May 1-5, 1917
12 48 May 6-12, 1917
12 49 May 13-19, 1917
12 50 May 20-27, 1917
12 51 May 28-31, 1917
12 52 June 1-2, 1917
13 1 June 3-9, 1917
13 2 June 10-16, 1917
13 3 June 17-23, 1917
13 4 June 24-30, 1917
13 5 July, 1917
13 6 August, 1917
13 7 September, 1917
13 8 October, 1917
13 9 November, 1917
13 10 December, 1917
13 11 1917
13 12 1918
13 13 1919
13 14 1920
13 15 1921
13 16 1922
13 17 1923
13 18 1924
13 19 1925
13 20 1926
13 21 1927
13 22 1928
13 23 1929
13 24 1930
13 25 1931
13 26 January, 1931
13 27 February, 1931
13 28 March, 1931
13 29 April-October, 1931
13 30 November, 1931
13 31 December, 1931
13 32 1932
13 33 1933
13 34 1934
13 35 1935
13 36 1936
13 37 1937
13 38 1938
13 39 1939
13 40 1941
13 41 1942
13 42 1943
13 43 1944
13 44 1945
13 45 1946
13 46 1947
13 47 1948
13 48 1949
13 49 1950
13 50 1951
13 51 1952
13 52 1953
13 53 1954
13 54 1955
13 55 1956
13 56 1957
13 57 1958
13 58 1960
13 59 1963
13 60 1965
13 61 1966
13 62 1970
13 63 1971
13 64 1973
13 65 1974
13 66 1975
13 67 1976
VII. Scrapbooks
16 #1 Baseball clippings; 1887-1897
16 #2 Garner, Sigourney and Jefferson Campaigns; January, 1896-January, 1904
14 #3 Marshalltown Campaign, 1909
17 #4 Wichita Campaign; November-December, 1911
17 #5 Pittsburgh Campaign; December 1913-February, 1914
18 #6 Miscellaneous Campaigns; ca. 1914-ca. 1916
19 #7 Miscellaneous Campaigns; ca. 1914-ca. 1916
14 #8 Philadelphia Campaign; January-March, 1915
15 #9 Philadelphia Campaign; January-December, 1913
15 #10 Boston Campaign; November 1916-January, 1917
16 #11 Buffalo Campaign; January-March, 1915
20 #12 New York City Campaign; April, 1917
21 #13 New York City Campaign; April-May, 1917
20 #14 New York City Campaign; April-June, 1917
21 #15 Los Angeles Campaign; September-October, 1917
23 #16 Atlanta Campaign; April-December, 1917
22 #17 Atlanta Campaign; November-December, 1917
14 #18 Monmouth Campaign; September-October, 1926
14 #19 "Bill"; n.d.
VIII. Photographs; 1882-1956; n.d.
24 1 Ackley, B.D.
24 2 Albin, Harold
24 3 Alexander, Charles
24 4 Asher, Virgina
24 5 Baughey Brothers
24 6 Bennett, Francis L.
24 7 Bindle, John
24 8 Bishop, Dort
24 9 Blackstone, Mrs.
24 10 Bray, Colin
24 11 Broker, Arthur Headley
24 12 Brown, Elijah B.
24 13 Buch, Harry
24 14 Campbell, Archibald M.
24 15 Campbell, Helen Lucille
24 16 Campbell, Ruth M.
24 17 Cassidy, J.H.
24 18 Chapman, J. Wilbur
24 19 Clarke, Harold D.
24 20 Clemens, Norman W.
28 1 Curley, James
24 21 Dahlman, James C.
24 22 Dalton, Emmet
24 23 Denning, E.B.
27 1 Derds, E.A.
24 24 Deyneka, Peter
24 25 Dickey, Sol C.
24 26 Dreake, Joseph
24 27 Emery, Allan C.
24 28 Erdman, Charles
24 29 Fischer, Fred
24 30 Fleischer, Jerry
24 31 Ford, H.M.
24 32 Fry, Phiny
24 33 Hadley, S.H.
24 34 Haines, Helen Sunday
27 2 Haines (?), Helen Sunday
24 35 Haines, Mark
24 36 Haines, Paul
28 2 Haines, Paul
24 37 Hart, Anna D.
24 38 Hess, Charles
24 39 Hoggatt, Voney T.
24 40 Howard, Harriet
24 41 Howard, William
24 42 Hull, Charles H.
27 3 Johnson, Walter
24 43 Kiemel, J.E.
27 4 Kinney, Florence
24 44 Knudsen, A.J.
24 45 Lane, K.
24 46 Larsen, Robert L.
24 47 Lynn, Nora
24 48 MacPhersen, F.W.
24 49 Marquis, D.C.
24 50 Matthews, Robert
28 3 McCall, Samuel W.
24 51 McCoy, N.E.
24 52 Metgieger, Harold Austin
24 53 Nelson, Robert
24 54 Nordine, Mel
27 5 Ohrvall, Charles
28 4 Ott, Edward A.
24 55 Palmer, Eugene
24 56 Payton, John G.
24 57 Peteson, Albert
24 58 Radcliffe, Mr. and Mrs. Franklin P.
24 59 Randolph, Totsie
24 60 Richardson, Charles W.
24 61 Ricker, Hiram
24 62 Riggs, Phil
27 6 Rodeheaver, Homer
24 63 Rodeheaver, Homer
24 64 Rosell, Merv
24 65 Russell, C.W.R.
24 66 Rutherford, Matthew
27 7 Saltzman
24 67 Sander, O.E.
24 68 Sanford, Sylvester
24 69 Sauling, Hamp
24 70 Saulnier, Harold
24 71 Saxe, Grace
24 72 Sayers, Mabel
24 73 Shaffor, David
24 74 Sheppos, Mark
24 75 Stewart, Lester
24 76 St. Germain, Eugenie
24 77 Stockton, Amy
24 78 Sunday, Alice
24 79 Sunday, Edward
24 80 Sunday, George M.
28 5 Sunday, George M., Sr.
24 81 Sunday, George M., Jr.
24 82 Sunday, Harriet Mason
Sunday, Helen Amelia (Thompson)
24 83 Early
24 84 1886 (ca.)
24 85 1911
24 86 1913
24 87 1916
28 6 1916
24 88 1917
24 89 1918
24 90 1921
24 91 1929
24 92 1936
Sunday, Helen Amelia (Thompson)
24 93 1937
24 94 1938
24 95 1940
24 96 1941
24 97 1947
24 98 1948
24 99 1946
24 100 1950
24 101 1951
24 102 1952
24 103 1953
24 104 1954
24 105 1955
24 106 1956
24 107 n.d.
24 108 n.d.
24 109 n.d.
28 7 n.d.
25 1 Sunday, Howard
25 2 Sunday, John
25 3 Sunday, Lurlyne
25 4 Sunday, (?) Marianne
25 5 Sunday, Paul
25 6 Sunday, Renee (?)
Sunday, William Ashley
25 7 Boyhood Scenes
25 8 Early
27 8 Early
25 9 1882
25 10 1886
25 11 1890
25 12 1895
25 13 1903
25 14 1905
25 15 1906
25 16 1908
25 17 1910
25 18 1911
25 19 1912
25 20 1913
25 21 1914
27 9 1914
Sunday, William Ashley
25 22 1915
28 8 1915
25 23 1916
28 9 1916
25 24 1917
27 10 1917
25 25 1918
27 11 1918
25 26 1919
25 27 1920
25 28 1921
27 12 1921
25 29 1922
25 30 1923
25 31 1925
25 32 1926
27 13 1927
25 33 1928
25 34 1929
25 35 1930
25 36 1931
25 37 1932 (?)
27 14 1934
25 38 n.d.
25 39 n.d.
25 40 n.d.
28 10 n.d.
25 41 Winona Lake, IN home
25 42 Family Scenes
Sunday, William A. and Helen A.
25 43 1890's
25 44 Hood River, Oregon home
25 45 1914
27 15 1914
25 46 1916
25 47 1917
27 16 1917
25 48 1918
25 49 1920
25 50 1925
25 51 1926
25 52 1929
Sunday, William A. and Helen A.
25 53 1931
25 54 n.d.
28 11 n.d.
25 55 Sunday, William A. Jr.
27 17 Sunday Party, n.d.
25 56 Sunshine Mission
27 18 Tabernacle Exterior, n.d.
25 57 Thomas, Jane
25 58 Thompson, William J.
25 59 Thompson, Mrs. William J.
25 60 Torrey, R.A.
25 61 Trotter, Mel
25 62 Vom Bruch, Harold
25 63 Walker, Ray
25 64 Wong, C.P.
25 65 Webber, A.R.
25 66 Wells, W.E.
25 67 West, John B.
25 68 White, Harold
25 69 Whittman, Karl P.
25 70 Williams, M.B.
25 71 Wilson, George
28 12 Yangco, J.R.
26 1 Crowds Inside Tabernacle; n.d.
26 2 Crowds Outside Tabernacle; n.d.
26 3 Revival Scenes Album; n.d.
26 4 Sunday Party; n.d.
27 17 Sunday Party; n.d.
26 5 Tabernacle Exteriors; n.d.
27 18 Tabernacle Exteriors; n.d.
26 6 Tabernacle Interiors; n.d.
26 7 Pacific Garden Mission; 1880s
26 8 Garner, IA; 1896
26 9 Dundee, IL; 1900
26 10 ? Carthage, IL; 1904
26 11 Salida, CO; 1906
26 12 Kankakee, IL; 1906
26 13 Galesburg, IL; 1907
26 14 Bloomington, IL; 1908
26 15 Decatur, IL; 1908
26 16 Springfield, IL; 1909
26 17 Marshalltown, IA; 1909
26 18 1910
26 19 Portsmouth, OH; 1911
26 20 Lima, OH; 1911
26 21 Springfield, OH; 1911
27 19 Wichita, KS; 1911
26 22 Wheeling, WV; 1912
26 23 McKeesport, PA; 1912
26 24 Columbus, OH; 1912
28 13 Columbus, OH; 1913
26 25 Columbus, OH; 1913
26 26 Wilkes Barre, PA; 1913
26 27 South Bend, IN; 1913
26 28 Steubenville, OH; 1913
26 29 Johnstown, PA; 1913
26 30 Denver, CO; 1914
26 31 Elkhart, IN; 1914
27 20 Syracuse, NY; 1914
26 32 Patterson, NJ; 1915
27 21 Philadelphia, PA; 1915
26 33 Syracuse, NY; 1915
26 34 Baltimore, MD; 1916
26 35 Kansas City, MO; 1916
28 14 Kansas City, MO; 1916
28 15 Detroit, MI; 1916
26 36 Boston, MA; 1916-1917
26 37 Buffalo, NY; 1917
28 16 Buffalo, NY; 1917
26 38 New York City; 1917
26 39 Los Angeles, CA; 1917
28 17 Los Angeles, CA; 1917
26 40 University of Southern California
26 41 Atlanta, GA; 1917
28 18 Atlanta, GA; 1917
26 42 Washington; 1918
26 43 Providence, RI; 1918
26 44 Newport, RI; 1918
26 45 Chattanooga, TN; 1919
26 46 Fairmont, WV; 1921
26 47 Daytona Beach, FL
26 48 Cincinnati, OH; 1921
27 22 Cincinnati, OH; 1921
26 49 Bluefield, WV; 1921
26 50 Spartanburg, SC; 1922
28 19 Spartanburg, SC; 1922
26 51 Charlestown, WV
26 52 Elmira, OH; 1924
26 53 Winston-Salem, NC; 1925
26 54 Birmingham, NY; 1926
26 55 Monmouth, IL; 1926
26 56 Franklin, PA; 1931
26 57 Havre, MT; 1931
26 58 Millbrook, NY; 1933-1935
26 59 Peoria, IL; 1934
XI. Supplement
31 1 Correspondence; 1886-1939, n.d.
William A. Sunday
Sermon Notebook
31 2 n.d.
31 3 n.d.
31 4 n.d.
31 5 n.d.
31 6 n.d.
31 7 n.d.
31 8 n.d.
31 9 n.d.
31 10 n.d.
31 11 n.d.
31 12 n.d.
31 13 Sermon Outlines from Ackley; 1919
31 14 Sermon Sourcebook; n.d.
31 15 Sermon Fragments; 1919
31 16 Atonement; n.d.
31 17 Backsliding; n.d.
31 18 Being in Agony; n.d.
31 19 The Conversion of Matthew; n.d
31 20 I Cor. 15:57; n.d.
31 21 David's Little Place; n.d.
31 22 The Elder Brother; n.d.
31 23 End; n.d.
31 24 Excuses; n.d.
31 25 Faith; n.d.
31 26 Galatians 2:20; n.d.
31 27 Get on the Water Wagon; n.d.
31 28 Hebrews 13:8; n.d.
31 29 Holy Spirit; n.d.
31 30 If Any Man Will; n.d.
31 31 It Pays to Do Right; n.d.
31 32 Jacob; n.d.
31 33 Jekyll-Hyde; n.d.
31 34 John 3:16; n.d.
31 35 The Judgment; n.d.
31 36 Let Light Shine; n.d.
31 37 Liberalism; n.d.
31 38 Lost Word; n.d.
31 39 Matthew 7:2; n.d.
31 40 Mighty Man; n.d.
31 41 Mind Work - Neh. 4:6; n.d.
31 42 Mother's Sermon; n.d.
31 43 No Second Chance; n.d.
31 44 Objections Answered; n.d.
31 45 Rev. 7:17; n.d.
31 46 Rewards; n.d.
31 47 Secret or Failure; n.d.
31 48 Seek Ye the Lord; n.d.
31 49 Son of Man; n.d.
31 50 They Cried You Are Devil; n.d.
31 51 They Need Not Depart Give Ye Them to Eat; n.d.
31 52 Three Great Things; n.d.
31 53 Three Groups; n.d.
31 54 Trail Serpent; n.d.
31 55 The Unpardonable Sin; n.d.
31 56 What Must I Do To Be Saved
31 57 What Shall I Do Then With Jesus; n.d.
31 58 Why the Disciples Failed; n.d.
31 59 Women; n.d.
32 1 Press Clippings; 1929-1939, n.d.
32 2 Scrapbook; Detroit Campaign; July-November, 1916



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