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Psychology

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Master of Arts

                Clinical Mental Health Counseling

                Counseling Ministries

                Marriage and Family Therapy

Doctor of Psychology

                Admissions

                Requirements

Clinical Mental Health Counseling Course Descriptions

Marriage and Family Therapy Course Descriptions

Psychology Course Descriptions

 

Associate Dean of Psychology, Associate Professor Terri Watson

Arthur P. Rech and Mrs. Jean May Rech Professor of Psychology, Associate Professor Jamie Aten

Professors of Psychology Richard Butman, Sally Schwer Canning, Stanton Jones, William Struthers, Cynthia Neal Kimball

Professor of Counseling Michael Mangis, Tammy Schultz

Associate Professors of Psychology David Boan, Kelly Flanagan, Sarah Hall, Ezer Kang, Raymond Phinney, Jana Pressley, John Vessey, Natalia Yangarber-Hicks

Associate Professor of Marriage and Family Therapy David Van Dyke

Assistant Professors of Psychology Ward Davis, Elisha Eveleigh, Darlene Hannah, Benjamin Pyykkonen, Sandra Yu Rueger

Assistant Professor of Counseling Pamela Davis

Assistant Professors of Marriage and Family Therapy Jacob Johnson, Hana Yoo

Co-Directors of Humanitarian Disaster Institute Jamie Aten, David Boan

Master of Arts

Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Director, Pamela Davis

The Master of Arts degree program in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (CMHC) offers training in professional counseling. Our students are prepared for employment as professional counselors in a wide variety of settings such as hospitals, mental health agencies, human service agencies, churches, international ministries, and private counseling practice. This degree fulfills the educational requirements in most states for licensure as a Clinical Professional Counselor and certification as a National Certified Counselor (NCC). Many of our graduates become licensed as Clinical Professional Counselors (LPC/LCPC) or Mental Health Counselors (LMHC) depending on the licenses available in the state where they practice. Some enter other related mental health ministries and careers. Other graduates of our program have gone on for doctoral work in counselor education or clinical psychology programs. The coursework in this program was designed to meet or exceed the educational standards for professional counselors set forth by the state of Illinois and the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC).

Requirements for admission to the Master's Program in Clinical Mental Health Counseling includes completion of the bachelor's degree, incorporating at least 12 semester hours in counseling, psychology, or a related field. Introductory or General Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, and Research/Statistics are required courses (though they may be taught under other course titles), plus at least one of the following courses:

*       Human Development or Lifespan Development.

*       Theories of Counseling or Theories of Personality.

 

Requirements for the Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling are 51 semester hours of course work plus a three hour graduate practicum and a six hour graduate internship for a total of 60 hours. Required courses include CMHC 611, 612, 613, 614, 614L, 618, 621, 621L, 622, 623, 624,631, 632, 636, 641, 642, 649, 651, 653, 691, 692, 696, BITH 561, and a four hour biblical and theological studies course from the approved Category I listing in the Graduate School section of this catalog. CMHC students must successfully pass a written comprehensive examination (CMHC 691) covering eight common core areas of counseling: human growth and development; social and cultural foundations; helping relationships; group work; career and lifestyle development; appraisal; research and program evaluation; and professional orientation and ethics.

Clinical Mental Health Counseling Courses (CMHC)

CMHC 611. Foundations of Integration I. A seminar in which an understanding of social, cultural, and spiritual context is developed to facilitate an integrated view of the person and of mental health practice. Emphasis is on historical, philosophical, and theological perspectives. (1)

CMHC 612. Foundations of Integration II. A continuation of seminar I which facilitates an integrated view of the person and of mental health practice. Emphasis is on application of faith practice integration to the treatment of marginalized populations and service to the church worldwide. (1)

CMHC 613. Foundations of Integration III. A seminar that focuses on entry into clinical mental health practice, including application for licensure, models of supervision, and building a career and/or ministry in the mental health field. (1)

CMHC 614. Group Counseling. The study of group counseling, theory, and models of practice, including the role of group leadership; tools for forming a group and orienting members; and catalysts for interaction, skills for conducting and evaluating counseling/therapy groups. Emphasis will be given to ethical issues. Must be taken concurrently with CMHC 614L. (2)

CMHC 614L. Group Counseling Lab. Provides an experiential small group designed to promote personal and professional growth. Graded pass/fail. Concurrent registration with CMHC 614. (1)

CMHC 618. Research Design and Program Evaluation. Overviews the research and program evaluation methodologies available to mental health professionals. Emphasis will be given to the design, implementation, and critique of clinically relevant research. (3)

CMHC 621. Counseling Skills and Techniques. Focuses on the development of counseling skills and techniques essential to clinical mental health practice, from a humanistic/experiential and existential perspective. Must be taken concurrently with CMHC 621L. This course is available only to CMHC and Counseling Ministries students. (2)

CMHC 621L Basic Counseling Skills Lab. A basic skills lab involving practice, video-taped sessions, and supervision of counseling skills necessary to establishing and maintaining a professional helping relationship. Concurrent registration with CMHC 621. This course is available only to CMHC and Counseling Ministries students. Graded pass/fail. (1)

CMHC 622. Clinical Counseling Theories and Practice I. The study of theories and models of personality and psychopathology, as well as methods of counseling, from a psychodynamic perspective. Emphasis will be given to the development of appropriate counseling treatment plans. This course is available only to CMHC and Counseling Ministries students. (3)

CMHC 623. Clinical Counseling Theories and Practice II. The study of theories and models of personality and psychopathology, as well as methods of counseling, from a behavioral and cognitive –behavioral perspective. Emphasis will be given to the development of appropriate counseling treatment plans. This course is available only to CMHC and Counseling Ministries students. (3)

CMHC 624. Issues and Ethics in Professional Practice. Introduces concepts regarding the professional functioning of counselors, including history, roles, professional organizations, ethics, legalities, standards, and credentialing. Current issues in the practice of counseling in a professional setting are explored. This course is available only to CMHC and Counseling Ministries students. (3)

CMHC 631. Lifespan Development. Addresses the major theories of human development across the life span. Stages and developmental tasks related to normal development, prevention of mental health crises, and counseling are explored. Concerns of individuals at different life stages are addressed, with an emphasis on the physical, emotional, intellectual, and spiritual growth of the individual. (3)

CMHC 632. Crises and Community Counseling. An introduction to community and crisis counseling and models of community resiliency. Emphasis on providing evidence-based clinical interventions in disaster and crisis situations, including emergencies requiring advocacy, intervention, and support. Topics addressed include vicarious trauma, psychological first aid, suicide prevention models, and community based prevention and intervention strategies. Counselors' roles and responsibilities during crises and counselor self-care strategies will be explored. Prerequisites: CMHC 621, 622, 623. (3)

CMHC 633. Couples Counseling. An introduction to the practice of couples counseling, including an overview of the major models and techniques from both the professional and Christian literature with special attention to ethnicity and gender issues in couple assessment and treatment. Discussion of contemporary issues including divorce, remarriage, domestic violence, infidelity, cross-cultural marriage, same sex couples, couples in ministry, and gender issues will be emphasized. (3)

CMHC 636. Family Systems Theory and Counseling. An examination of the major models of family systems theory and counseling applied to the understanding of normal and abnormal family functioning. This course is available only to CMHC and Counseling Ministries students. (3)

CMHC 641. Assessment in Counseling. A clinical skills course focusing on the principles of measurement and assessment and counseling use of various assessment instruments: achievement, aptitude, intelligence, interest, and personality. Covers supervision in administering, scoring, and interpreting assessment tools. (3)

CMHC 642. Psychopathology: Biological and Sociocultural Foundations. The study of the major mental disorders as defined by the DSM including an introduction to the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, appropriate psychopharmacological interventions, biological bases of behavior, and spiritual dimensions of these disorders. Explores the impact of culture and emerging technologies on the treatment of individuals and groups. (3)

CMHC 644. Child and Adolescent Development and Treatment. An examination of the models of understanding child and adolescent development and psychopathology and an introduction to the treatment modalities for children and adolescents. (3)

CMHC 647. Foundations of Play Therapy. Provides an overview of the essential elements and principles of play therapy, including history, theories, modalities, techniques, applications, and skills. Emphasizes an experiential component focused on basic play therapy skill development within the context of ethical and diversity sensitive practice. Prerequisites: CMHC 621, 622, and 631 or permission of instructor. (3)

CMHC 649. Multicultural Issues and Social Advocacy in Counseling. Examines theories of multicultural counseling, identity development, pluralistic trends, and the application of culturally appropriate intervention strategies to individuals, couples, families, groups, and communities. Major ethnic groups are studied, along with the counseling, social justice, and advocacy approaches to each. Counselor cultural self-awareness and the role of counseling in eliminating bias, prejudice, oppression, and discrimination are emphasized. (3)

CMHC 651. Substance Abuse and Addictions. A survey of basic issues surrounding the conceptualization, etiology, progression, assessment, and treatment of chemical abuse, dependence, and addiction, including the study of the family of the chemically dependent individual. (3)

CMHC 653. Lifestyle and Career Development. An overview of theories of occupational choice and career development and their application to assessing, treating, and preventing career problems across the life cycle. (3)

CMHC 661. Spiritual Direction and Care of the Soul. An introduction to the contemporary and classical literature and traditions of Christian spirituality and spiritual direction and their relevance to the helping professions. Psychology’s neglect of the spiritual life and of the church’s tradition of soul care addressed. (3)

CMHC 691. Comprehensive Exit Exam. Objective written comprehensive exam that may be taken at any point in the program once the student has completed 36 hours of coursework. The exam covers the eight CACREP common core areas: Human Growth, Social and Cultural Foundations, Helping Relationships, Groupwork, Career and Lifestyle Development, Appraisal, Research and Program Evaluation, and Professional Orientation and Ethics. Graded Pass/Fail. (0)

CMHC 692. Graduate Counseling Practicum. Introductory supervised field experience that provides students with the opportunity to observe clinical mental health professionals as they function and to develop primary level mental health service provision skills. Participation in a regularly scheduled professional development seminar with faculty is required. Graded pass/fail. (3)

CMHC 695. Independent Study. Guided research on an elected problem in counseling or the related fields of prevention or psychoeducation. (1-4)

CMHC 696. Graduate Internship. Supervised clinical experience in an approved setting that provides students with the opportunity to develop entry level counseling skills necessary for professional mental health practice. Participation in a regularly scheduled professional development seminar with faculty is required. Prerequisite: CMHC 692. Graded pass/fail. (3,6)

Counseling Ministries

Director, Michael Mangis

 

The Master of Arts degree program in Counseling Ministries offers training in the application of psychological theory and practice to ministry settings. Students in this program are prepared for work in churches, mission agencies, and other settings where lay counseling, support groups, and other healing ministries are provided. The program is especially designed for lay people and clergy who are involved in spiritual formation, pastoral care, and healing ministries and desire more extensive training in the application of psychological studies to those ministries. Because the program can be completed in one year, international applicants and furloughed missionaries may find it especially suited to their needs. While this program exists to facilitate the application of psychological studies to ministry settings, it is not intended to prepare graduates for licensure as counselors, psychologists, or marriage and family therapists or to provide psychological services which are restricted to licensed practitioners.

Requirements for admission to the Master's Program in Counseling Ministries include completion of the bachelor's degree, incorporating at least nine semester hours in psychology, including Introductory or General Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, and Personality (though they may be taught under other course titles).

Requirements for the Master of Arts in Counseling Ministries are 32 semester hours of course work plus a four-hour internship for a total of 36 hours. Required courses include PSYC 512, 512L, 551, 596, 597, and CMHC 611, 612, 614, 614L, 624, BITH 561, and a four-hour biblical and theological studies course from the approved Category I listing in the Graduate School section of this catalog. In addition, six hours must be selected from four core clinical mental health counseling courses CMHC 621, (CMHC 621L must also be taken if CMHC 621 is selected), 622, 623 or 636. Electives may be selected from 400-level (maximum of eight hours), 500-, and 600-level, and specified 800-level psychology courses, 600 level clinical counseling (CMHC) courses, and from 500- and 600-level courses in another Wheaton College graduate program (maximum of four hours) in consultation with an advisor.

For application to either M.A. program, course work in Developmental Psychology, Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy, and an Introduction to Clinical Psychology is beneficial although not required. Further, students should have completed at least 16 semester hours in humanities (e.g. art, English, history, literature, music, philosophy). Within the humanities, an emphasis on philosophy courses is encouraged. Course work in Bible/Theology is viewed favorably but is not required. In some cases, exceptions to the above admissions requirements may be allowed.

In addition to the standard materials required for consideration for admission (GRE General Test with the qualitative reasoning, transcripts, recommendations, and résumé), applicants should have submitted as a part of their application a Supplemental Reference Form, completed by a mental health professional, which is included in the application package. Applicants to the Counseling Ministries program must also be available for an application interview either in person or via telephone.

Marriage and Family Therapy

Director, David Van Dyke

The Master of Arts degree program in Marriage and Family Therapy offers training in the professional practice of couple and family therapy from a distinctly Christian perspective. Our students are prepared for employment and licensure as master’s-level marriage and family therapists. Regulations and requirements on the practice of master's-level therapists vary from state to state, and applicants should become familiar with the requirements in the state in which they wish to practice. Students who wish to practice in the state of Illinois at the master's level must obtain a license as a Marriage and Family Therapist.

Requirements for admission to the Master's MFT Program include completion of the bachelor's degree, incorporating at least 12 semester hours in the following areas:

*       clear1x1clear1x1Research methods, research design or statistics (3 semester hours)

*       Family studies, psychology or allied field (2 courses; 6 semester hours)

*       Human Development (3 semester hours)


Requirements for the Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy
are 48 semester hours of course work which include six-hours of clinical practicum. Required courses include MAFT 618, 624, 631, 633, 634, 635, 637, 642, 645, 655, 656, 661, 662, 663, 664, 696, 697, 698, PSYC 512, BITH 561, and a four-hour biblical and theological studies course from the approved Category I listing in the Graduate School section of this catalog. In addition to the 48 required credits, electives may be selected from PSYC 400-level (maximum of eight hours), 600-level, and specified 800-level psychology courses in consultation with an advisor.

For application to the MFT M.A. program, students should have completed at least 16 semester hours in humanities (e.g. art, English, history, literature, music, philosophy). Within the humanities, an emphasis on philosophy courses is encouraged. Course work in Bible/Theology is viewed favorably but is not required. In some cases, exceptions to the above admissions requirements may be allowed.

In addition to the standard materials required for consideration for admission (GRE General Test with the qualitative reasoning, transcripts, recommendations, and résumé), applicants should have submitted as a part of their application a Supplemental Reference Form, completed by a mental health professional, which is included in the application package.

Marriage and Family Therapy Courses (MAFT)

MAFT 618. Family Therapy Research & Implications for Evidence-Based Practice. An overview of research methodology, data analysis, and the evaluation of research in couple and family therapy and how research informs MFT common factors and evidence-based practice. (3)

MAFT 624. MFT Ethics & Professional Practice. An overview of ethical issues related to the profession and practice of MFT including the AAMFT Code of Ethics, professional identity, professional organizations, and licensure. (3)

MAFT 631. Individual & Family Life Cycle Development. The study of individual and family development across the lifespan, exploring continuity and change within the developing individual and family. (3)

MAFT 633. Couple Therapy: Systemic Assessment and Intervention. An overview of theoretical models and skills necessary for effective treatment of couple relationship and sexual functioning. (3)

MAFT 634. Marriage & Family Therapy I: Theoretical Foundations. An introduction to historical development, theoretical and empirical foundations of systems theory including a survey of the major models of marriage, couple, and family therapy and an overview of contemporary conceptual directions. (3)

MAFT 635. Marriage & Family Therapy II: Systemic Assessment & Intervention. An application of relational/systems theory to a variety of presenting clinical problems including but not limited to physical health and illness, major mental health issues, traditional psychodiagnostic categories, and relational problems. (3)

MAFT 637. Families in Context: Culture, class, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity & religion. An overview of the impact of diversity, power, and privilege as they related to culture, class, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and religion in families and their influence on couple and family treatment. (3)

MAFT 642. Psychopathology and the Family. The study of the etiology and maintenance of the major mental disorders and the role of the family and community in assessment and intervention. The DSM-IV-TR classification system and the biological bases of behavior are given special attention. (3)

MAFT 645. Systemic Interventions with Children and Adolescents. An examination of systemic models of conceptualizing child and adolescent problems and an introduction to systemic treatment modalities for working with children, adolescents and their families. (3)

MAFT 655. Systemic Interventions with Special Populations: Abusive families, families with addictions, domestic violence, and under-resourced families. An advanced skills course providing theory and techniques for treatment of special populations in marriage and family therapy. (3)

MAFT 656. Integration seminar: MFT and Christian faith/practice. An advanced seminar examining historical and contemporary issues in the integration of Christian faith, systemic epistemology, and the practice of Marriage and Family Therapy (3)

MAFT 661, 662, 663, 664. Personal and Professional Development Group (PPDG). A small group class focusing on development of MFT identity, person of the therapist issues, group dynamics, and spiritual formation. (0)

MAFT 696, 697. Clinical Practicum I. First year clinical practicum focusing on observation of clinical work and development of beginning MFT skills. Graded pass/fail (1)

MAFT 698, 699. Clinical Practicum II. Second year clinical practicum in which students secure outside placements and provide couple and family therapy under supervision by professionals on site. In addition, students received another hour supervision per week on campus by faculty AAMFT Approved Supervisors. Graded pass/fail (2 each semester)

Doctor of Psychology

Director, Benjamin Pyykkonen

Director Clinical Training, Jana Pressley

The Psy.D. is designed to prepare students for careers in applied areas of clinical psychology. While requiring a strong program of core courses in the basic areas of psychology, the primary focus of developing professional skills necessary for clinical practice is taught through the applied course work. These courses include a sequence of assessment courses, core paradigm or theory courses, therapeutic interviewing skills, and ethics and professional issues. Practicum/Clerkship training at professional sites begins in the second and continues through the fourth year. The Psy.D. program is accredited by the Committee on Accreditation of the American Psychological Association.

Requirements for admission to the Psy.D. program include completion of the bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university with a minimum 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale. In addition, at least 18 semester hours in psychology are required, including at least one course in each of the following groups of courses:

*       General psychology

*       Abnormal psychology or psychopathology

*       Quantitative methods, statistics, research methods, or experimental design

*       Personality psychology or theories of psychotherapy

*       Physiological psychology

*       One course from the traditional scientific subdisciplines (i.e., learning, cognition, social or developmental psychology, or sensation/perception).

 

Applicants must take the GRE general test. Personal interviews are required for all finalists in the application process.

Requirements for the Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology are 120 semester hours of course work. Required courses are all of the 700-level courses and PSYC 894, 896, 898, 991, 992, 993; CFM 538; plus BITH 561, BITH 622, BITH 623, and four credits in each of the areas of biblical theology, systematic theology, and church history. In addition, 14 hours of Psy.D. electives are required. Psy.D. students must successfully pass a written comprehensive examination (PSYC 991) covering the areas of basic and applied psychology and a professional qualifying examination (PSYC 992) based on a clinical case presentation. Students must successfully complete and orally defend a clinical dissertation (PSYC 993 & PSYC 898) and complete an approved clinical internship (PSYC 896) to graduate. Degree requirements must be completed within seven years of the first date of enrollment.

The Master of Arts degree in Clinical Psychology will be granted to students in the Psy.D. program upon completion of 48 credits, including a minimum of 40 hours of 700-level courses in psychology. The required psychology courses that must be completed are PSYC 714, 715, 716, 717, 721, 736, 737, 738, 743, 744, 746, 747, 753, and four credits of 796. A maximum of 12 credits applied to the M.A. degree may be transfer credit. To be awarded the degree, students must also have completed a minimum of six hours in biblical and theological studies, including BITH 561 and at least one four-hour course selected from the Theological Studies requirement list in the required subject areas of biblical theology, interpretation, systematic theology, or church history. Students should file for candidacy for the master's degree after 28 credit hours are completed. To receive approval of candidacy, students will need to document that all prerequisites for admission have been satisfactorily completed. Further, adequacy of progress in academic and professional skill areas and suitability for professional practice in psychology will be reviewed. Students who have a master's degree in clinical psychology from Wheaton upon matriculation into the Psy.D. program may not obtain a second M.A. in this field.

As previously noted, the Psy.D. program requires a substantial number of theological studies courses. Students desiring to complete a Master of Arts degree in Theology may do so by submitting a Second-degree Application to the Graduate Admissions office before completing additional courses in theology. In addition to the 48 hours of course work, students need to pass a written comprehensive exam or write a thesis. Hours counted for the M.A. cannot be applied to another master's degree from Wheaton (hours cannot count for both Clinical Psychology M.A. and this M.A. program). A maximum of 25% of the credits applied to the M.A. degree in Theological Studies may be transfer credit. Up to eight hours of doctoral-level psychology courses may count as electives towards the M.A. degree in Theology.

Psychology Courses (PSYC)

Note: Graduate courses are designated 512-899. Students in the master's program may be allowed to take suitably enriched 400-level courses for graduate credit (limit of eight hours). 600-level courses are open only to M.A. students. 700- and 800-level courses are open only to Psy.D. students unless otherwise specified or with faculty and department chair approvals.

PSYC 512. Theories and Principles of Counseling. Designed for counseling ministries and marriage and family therapy students, this course provides an examination of several of the major theories of counseling with an emphasis on techniques and principles common to each theory. This course does not count towards the M.A. in Clinical Psychology. (3)

PSYC 512L. Theories and Principles of Counseling Lab. A counseling skills lab involving practice of therapeutic skills, video-taped sessions, and supervision of skills acquisition. Counseling Ministries students are required to take PSYC 512L concurrently with PSYC 512. Graded pass/fail. (1)

PSYC 551. Counseling Challenges in Ministry. A psychoeducative approach is used to enable Christian leaders to help individuals and families understand and deal with contemporary issues—e.g., step-families, single parenting, divorce, abortion. Other topics covered include: coping with depression, strong emotions, i.e., anger and anxiety, conflict. This course does not count toward the M.A. in Clinical Psychology. (2)

PSYC 596. Graduate Internship. Supervised practicum experience in an approved setting for counseling ministry. Concurrent registration with PSYC 597 is required. Graded pass/fail. (1, 2, 3, 4)

PSYC 597. Internship Seminar. Professional development seminar required with PSYC 596. Graded pass/fail. (0)

PSYC 698. Master's Thesis.

PSYC 699. Master's Thesis Continuation. See M.A. Thesis/Applied Thesis/Action Research. (0)

PSYC 714. Professional Development and Ethics I. An introduction to the practice of professional psychology, and to the ethical, legal, and professional issues confronting psychologists. Emphasis will be on fostering students’ knowledge of the profession’s ethics code and guidelines and on developing professional goals and behaviors. Special attention will be paid to the integration of Christian faith in accordance with the program’s mission statement. (3)

PSYC 715. Professional Development and Ethics II. This course will focus on continued professional identity development, particularly in light of the program’s emphasis on serving the church and serving underserved and marginalized persons. Students will continue to explore complex professional ethics issues, identify and address special challenges in psychology from a Christian faith perspective, and will articulate their own professional development plan. Prerequisite: PSYC 714. (2)

PSYC 716. Basic Clinical Interviewing Skills. A basic skill course in clinical interviewing strategies and challenges. (3)

PSYC 717. Class, Gender, Race, Religion & Sexual Identity. An introduction to the diverse populations psychologists serve and the clinical competencies necessary for effective psychologists. (3)

PSYC 721. History and Systems of Psychology. A study of the history of psychology, with particular emphasis upon understanding contemporary thought in the philosophy of science, and its implications for our understanding of the history and current status of the discipline. (3)

PSYC 723. Group Theory and Therapy. A core theory and clinical skill course in group therapy. (2)

PSYC 736. Cognitive-Behavioral Theory and Practice. A core theory and clinical skill course in the cognitive-behavioral tradition. Covers the range of topics from traditional behavior modification to social-cognitive and cognitive views to third-wave therapies. (3)

PSYC 737. Psychoanalytic and Contemporary Psychodynamic Theory and Practice. A core theory and clinical skill course in the psychodynamic tradition. Covers the range of topics from classical psychoanalysis through contemporary object-relations, self psychological, and relational psychoanalytic views. (3)

PSYC 738. Family Systems Theory and Therapy. A core theory and clinical skill course in the family systems tradition. An overview of the major approaches to family therapy with an emphasis on developmental and systemic models, and development of family assessment, conceptualization, and intervention skills. Prerequisites: PSYC 716, PSYCH 736, PSYC 737. (3)

PSYC 739. Community and Preventive Psychology. An examination of community and interpersonal factors causing and maintaining psychological dysfunction and well-being. Studies the preventive modes of mental health intervention. (3)

PSYC 743. Psychological Assessment I: Cognitive Foundations. An examination of the history of testing, and basic measurement theory and psychometrics. Includes exposure to the theory of intellectual and educational assessment with children and adults, and development of skills in administration, scoring, and interpretation of intellectual tests. (3)

PSYC 744. Psychological Assessment II: Personality Foundations. An examination of the theory and practice of personality assessment with children and adults. Covers objective and projective assessment methods, and development of skills in administration, scoring, and interpretation of these instruments. Prerequisite: PSYC 743. (3)

PSYC 745. Psychological Assessment III: Integrative Assessment. A clinical skill course focusing on the development of competency in integrative report writing, including the synthesis of testing data and information. Includes coverage of cultural issues in testing, interviewing and screening approaches, and the formulation of diagnosis and recommendations for intervention. Prerequisites: PSYC 743 and PSYC 744. (3)

PSYC 746. Research and Statistics I. An introduction to statistical methodology, with an emphasis on cultivating students' basic conceptual understanding of statistics and research methods, as well as foundational skills in conducting analyses and in participating in a research team. (3)

PSYC 747. Research and Statistics II: Analysis. An introduction to research design which includes quantitative statistical research designs, with an emphasis on establishing a strong conceptual framework for understanding the range of research designs and how to select or match a design to research quesiton/problem. Program evaluation methodology is also included. (3)

PSYC 748. Research and Statistics III: Data Interpretation & Qualitative Analysis. An introduction to basic approaches of qualitative analysis and a focus on interpretation and reporting of quantitative data. Prerequisites: PSYC 746 and PSYC 747. (3)

PSYC 753. Psychopathology. Doctoral-level examination of the categorization, diagnosis, etiology, and maintenance of abnormal behavior. (3)

PSYC 754. Biological Bases of Behavior. Covers the core knowledge in the biological bases of behavior for the practicing psychologist. (3)

PSYC 755. Cognition and Emotion. Examines contemporary perspectives on thought, memory, emotion, and other higher mental processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 754. (3)

PSYC 756. Psychopharmacology. A core course introducing the student to psychopharmacological treatments of various psychological disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 754. (3)

PSYC 773. Lifespan Development. Development throughout the lifespan from infancy through old age; focus on prominent developmental theories; protective and risk factors in atypical development. (3)

PSYC 774. Advanced Social Psychology. Advanced topics of relevance to understanding human behavior in its social context. (3)

PSYC 781. Advanced Ethics and Professional Issues. Advanced training in special topics among ethical, legal, and professional issues confronting the psychologist in practice. Prerequisites: PSYC 714 and PSYC 715. (3)

PSYC 782. Clinical Supervision and Consultation. Introduction to practice of effective supervision and training of mental health professionals and the skills needed to provide consultations with other professionals and organizations. Prerequisites: PSYC 796 – Practica I & II (3)

PSYC 796. Practica I, II, III, IV. A doctoral-level practicum covering assessment, treatment planning, case management, and psychotherapeutic intervention. (each 2)

PSYC 797. Practica-Seminar I, II, III, IV. A seminar group designed to facilitate the personal, professional, and spiritual formation of doctoral students who are concurrently in practica placements. Required attendance at both individual and group meetings. Required with PSYC 796. Graded pass/fail. (0)

PSYC 798. Practicum V/VI. An advanced doctoral-level practicum covering assessment, treatment planning, case management, and psychotherapeutic intervention. Prerequisite: eight credit hours of PSYC 796. Graded pass/fail. (0)

PSYC 823. Group Theory and Therapy. A theory and clinical skill course in group therapy. (3)

PSYC 832. Advanced Psychodynamic Psychology. A seminar course on the theory and practice of psychotherapy from a psychoanalytic perspective. Readings will focus on the breadth of perspectives in psychoanalysis, but will be oriented toward the practice of psychotherapy. Students must be concurrently providing psychotherapeutic services at a practicum or clerkship site. Prerequisite: PSYC 737. (3)

PSYC 833. Couple Therapy. A core theory and clinical skill course in the field of couple therapy. Covers a range of views including the behavioral, family systems, and psychodynamic. Prerequisite: PSYC 738. (3)

PSYC 834. Forensic Psychology. Focuses upon the knowledge base and skills needed for the psychologist to serve in such forensic contexts as child custody evaluations, family disputes, competency hearings and involuntary hospitalizations, disability evaluations, and jury selection. (3)

PSYC 837. Developmental Psychopathology. A foundational course providing an overview of developmental clinical child psychology. Emphasis will be given to an understanding of theology and developmental theories and research in relation to child psychopathology and clinical practice. (3)

PSYC 838. Advanced Couple and Family Therapy. An advanced seminar focusing on integrative models of couple and family therapy with a special emphasis on issues of ethnicity and gender. Students will develop the skills important in working with multiproblem couples and families. Students will also be introduced to models of couple and family supervision. Open to both M.A. and Psy.D. Clinical Psychology students. Prerequisites: Psy.D. PSYC 738, PSYC 833; M.A. PSYC 633, 636. (3)

PSYC 843. Neuropsychological Assessment. Introduction to theory and practice of assessing brain function and its behavioral correlates. (3)

PSYC 844. Child Psychological Assessment. A clinical skill course focusing on the administration, scoring, and interpretation of child psychological assessment strategies. Specific developmental considerations in assessment of this population will be examined. (3)

PSYC 845. Child & Adolescent Interventions. A clinical skills course introducing students to evidence-based intervention strategies targeting commonly seen diagnoses in children and adolescents. Developmental, cultural, and familial considerations in treatment are emphasized. Prerequisites: PSYC 716, 736, 737. (3)

PSYC 846. Geropsychology. Assessment and treatment of older adults and associated issues, including neuropsychological assessment and different diagnosis. Open to both M.A. and Psy.D. Clinical Psychology students. (3)

PSYC 849. Sexuality and Sex Therapy. An advanced elective introducing the student to the assessment and treatment of sexual dysfunction using a biopsychosocial model. Open to both M.A. and Psy.D. Clinical Psychology students. (3)

PSYC 851. Substance Abuse. A survey of basic issues surrounding the conceptualization, etiology, progression assessment, and treatment of chemical abuse, dependence, and addiction, including the study of the family of the chemically dependent individual. (3)

PSYC 853. Behavioral Medicine and Health Psychology. Contemporary theory and practice course exploring the relationship of psychological and behavioral change in relation to medical and other health-related matters. Prerequisite: PSYC 754. (3)

PSYC 854. Rehabilitation Psychology. An advanced elective exploring rehabilitation with special emphasis on the psychological aspects and the psychologist’s role. Treatment models from a neuropsychological and rehabilitative perspective are presented. Prerequisites: PSYC 754, 843.

PSYC 861. Spiritual Direction and Care of the Soul. An introduction to the contemporary and classical literature and traditions of Christian spirituality and spiritual direction and their relevance to the helping professions. Psychology's neglect of the spiritual life and of the church's tradition of soul care is addressed. (3)

PSYC 862. Advanced Integration of Psychology & Christian Theology. This course will focus on the integration of the Christian faith and clinical psychology. Students will be provided in-depth exposure to the literature regarding Christianity-psychology integration. Specific topics in emerging trends in the field will be selected and analyzed by the class in light of their theological coursework in the doctoral program. Prerequisite: PSYC 714 & PSYC 715. (3)

PSYC 891. Advanced Clerkship. Supervised advanced clinical experience in an approved setting. Prerequisites: eight credit hours of PSYC 796 and 2 semesters of PSYC 894. Attendance at Grand Rounds is required. Graded pass/fail. (0)

PSYC 892. Advanced Clerkship II. Supervised advanced clinical experience in an approved setting. Prerequisites: eight credit hours of PSYC 796 and 2 semesters of PSYC 894 and 2 semesters of PSYC 891. Attendance at Grand Rounds required. Graded pass/fail. (0)

PSYC 893. Seminar: Advanced Topics in Clinical Psychology. Advanced topics in clinical psychology presented and discussed in a two-full-day seminar. Readings required prior to attendance. Graded pass/fail. Open to both M.A. and Psy.D. Clinical Psychology students. Program limit: M.A. 4 hours; Psy.D. 12 hours including PSYC 895 hours. (1)

PSYC 894. Clerkship. Supervised clinical experience in an approved setting. Prerequisites: eight credit hours of PSYC 796. Attendance at Grand Rounds is required. Graded pass/fail. (0)

PSYC 895. Independent Study. (1-4)

PSYC 896. Clinical Internship. Degree requires registration in this course for two semesters and one summer. Graded pass/fail. (0)

PSYC 898. Clinical Dissertation. Degree requires a total of ten credits for the clinical dissertation. (1, 2, 3, 4)

PSYC 899. Clinical Dissertation Continuation. (Full-time). (0)

PSYC 991. Comprehensive Exam. Objective written comprehensive exam – the 1st qualifying exam. Pass/fail. Prerequisites: PSYC 714, 715, 716, 717, 721, 736, 737, 738, 739, 743, 744, 745, 746, 747, 748, 753, 754, 755, 773, 774, CFM 538, BITH 561 (0)

PSYC 992. Professional Qualifying Exam (PQE). Professional clinical qualifying exam – the 2nd qualifying exam. Pass/fail. Prerequisites: PSYC 991 unless petitioned to Psy.D. Program Clinical Training Committee. (0)

PSYC 993. Clinical Dissertation Proposal. Clinical Dissertation Proposal defense. Pass/fail. Prerequisites: PSYC 991. (0)

PSYC 999. Clinical Dissertation Continuation. (Part-time). (0)

Revision Date: July 1, 2014

 

 

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