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Politics and International Relations

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Departmental Mission Statement

Political Science

                Requirements for Major

                Requirements for Minor

                Course Descriptions

International Relations

                Requirements for Major

                Requirements for Minor

                Course Descriptions

 

Chair, Associate Professor Amy Black

Professors Mark Amstutz, Sandra Joireman

Associate Professors Leah Anderson, Bryan McGraw

Assistant Professors Larycia Hawkins

 

The Department of Politics and International Relations aims to foster a deeper appreciation for domestic and international politics through the study of political behavior, governmental institutions, and the international system. In fulfillment of this aim, the department offers courses that: 1) expose students to the major areas of the discipline, including American politics, international politics, comparative politics, public policy, law, and political philosophy; 2) emphasize concepts, theories, and tools that are essential in political analysis; 3) address key issues involved in the building of just and peaceful political communities; and 4) examine the relationship of Christianity and politics. The department offers majors in Political Science and International Relations that are firmly rooted in the traditional liberal arts curriculum of Wheaton College. Due to the large overlap between the two majors, department policy does not allow a double major in Political Science and International Relations.

Political Science

The major in political science serves as preparation for: a) graduate study in politics, government, and related fields, including area studies, public policy, and public administration; b) law school; c) careers in government and public affairs; and d) work in the private and non-profit sectors that require knowledge of government and politics.

Requirements for the Political Science major are 34 hours of political science and international relations and 4 hours of statistics. Core requirements are PSCI 135 American Politics and Government, PSCI 145 Political Philosophy and either IR 155 Comparative Politics or IR 175 International Politics, PSCI 215 Political Research, MATH 263 or a department-approved equivalent , PSCI 494 Senior Seminar and PSCI 496 Internship plus 14 hours of departmental electives from courses offered in PSCI, or from IR 351-415.

Students may substitute the following courses for the IR 155: 4 hours of IR 351-362 or 412-415 or for IR 175: 4 hours from IR 371-409. Note prerequisites for IR courses. A maximum of four hours each of 495 and 496 may be counted toward the major. Once a student is admitted into the major, all core requirements must be taken from Wheaton.

Requirements for a Political Science minor are 20 hours, PSCI 135; PSCI 145; either IR 155 or IR 175; and an additional 8 hours of upper division electives in either Political Science or International Relations. Note prerequisites for IR courses.

Political Science Courses (PSCI)

PSCI 135. American Politics and Government. A study of the origins, institutions, and behavior of the United States government in a comparative perspective. Emphasis is given to the U.S. Constitution and the federal government system.

PSCI 145. Political Philosophy. An exploration of some of the major themes in the tradition of western political thought, to include the nature of politics, freedom, equality, justice, and virtue. The course will center around some of the tradition’s most significant texts, including works by Plato, Augustine, Hobbes, Mill and more contemporary authors.

PSCI 215. Political Research. An introduction to the discipline of political science and the various methods of qualitative research used by political scientists. Special attention is given to research design and ethics. (2)

PSCI 231x. Chicago I. An Introduction See URBN 231. (2)

PSCI 232. Campaigns in Context. An examination of federal, state, and local campaigns with an emphasis on the politics and context of the November election. Wheaton-in-Washington Program. (2)

PSCI 233. Washington Workshop. Reflections on the meetings, briefings, and excursions in Washington, D.C. Wheaton -in-Washington Program. (2)

PSCI 234. Interest Groups and American Politics. An examination of the role of interest groups in the American political process. Wheaton-in-Washington Program. (2)

PSCI 235. Iowa Caucus. A hands-on exploration of the presidential nomination process including campaign work and observation of Iowa precinct caucuses. (2) Presidential election years.

PSCI 262. Politics and Public Policy. Far from mundane, public policymaking is rife with conflict. This course will explore and analyze public policy – the true substance of politics, as well as the actors and institutions relevant to public policy making.

PSCI 271. Introduction to Law. A study of the nature and function of law in society. Various disciplinary perspectives employed. (2)

PSCI 292. Abortion and the Law. An examination of human reproduction issues and abortion, focusing on the constitution and legal issues surrounding the topic. (2)

PSCI 334. Politics and Policy. A detailed exploration of the policy process including a simulation of legislative work on Capitol Hill. Wheaton-in-Washington Program.

PSCI 335. Politics and Pop Culture. An exploration and evaluation of portrayals of political themes and concepts in various forms of popular culture including films, television, and plays. (2) Prerequisite: PSCI 135 or instructor’s permission.

PSCI 336. Campaigns and Elections. Explores the structures and institutions of American electoral politics, including the nomination process and general elections. Gives special attention to the elements of the modern campaign, including campaign finance, research, polling, advertising, and media use. Alternate years.

PSCI 337. Women and Politics. An exploration of the role of American women and politics in the late nineteenth century and its transformation into the role of American women in politics by the late twentieth century. (2) Prerequisite: PSCI 135 or instructor’s permission. Diversity designation.

PSCI 341. Topics in Political Theory. A topical course in political theory that includes such subjects as Shakespeare & Politics, Technology & Politics, and the Power of the Powerless (Gandhi, King, and Havel). Periodic. (2)

PSCI 342. Research Methodology. An introduction to the various methods of research used by political scientists. Special attention is given to survey research and to computer applications and data analysis.

PSCI 343. Political Ethics. This course brings philosophical ethics and normative political theory into dialogue with the distinctive practical problems associated with contemporary American politics and policy. Topics to be considered include abortion, euthanasia, affirmative action, war, distributive justice, deception and manipulation, and the ethics of roles.

PSCI 346. Between Athens and Jerusalem: Classical and Medieval Political Thought. The western political tradition rests on the interplay between the claims emerging out of classical Greece and Rome on the one hand and out of Christianity on the other. This course explores that interplay by engaging both classical (Homer, Sophocles, Plato, Aristotle) and Christian political thinkers (Augustine, Aquinas).

PSCI 347. Renaissance and Modern Political Philosophy. This course chronicles the replacement of the Christian order and the development of its theoretical alternative, modernity. Thinkers considered include: Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud.

PSCI 348. American Political Thought. An analysis of central ideas in the history of American political thought, from the founding to the present.

PSCI 349. Christian Political Thought. An engagement with the varieties of Christian thinking about politics, including both its historical development and the contemporary alternatives. Thinkers explored will include Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, Calvin, Locke, Niebuhr, Hauerwas, and a number of others.

PSCI 351. Topics in American Politics. Selected topics, designed to give added breadth and depth to the understanding of American politics and/or political behavior. (4)

PSCI 353. Topics in American Politics. Selected topics, designed to give added breadth and depth to the understanding of American politics and/or political behavior. (2)

PSCI 352. Interest Groups and Political Advocacy. This course explores the nature of interest groups including the formation and maintenance of interest groups, various types of interest groups, the tactics employed by interest groups and the impact and influence of interest groups in the political system broadly and public policy specifically.

PSCI 355. Race and the Politics of Welfare. This course examines the evolution of welfare politics with particular attention to the social, historical, and philosophical dynamics that rendered welfare a racially-charged issue. (2) Diversity designation.

PSCI 362. Global Cities: Cities & the World. This course examines the effects of globalization on major urban centers in the world system, comparing and contrasting cities in North America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. Students will study the economic, political and social impact, as well as responses of government and civil society.

PSCI 373. Environmental Politics. The discourses, institutions, and practices that govern our relations with ‘nature’ and environmentally-medicated social relations are considered. Examining local, national, and global levels of environmental governance, the course focuses on four issues: cities and the environment, energy, biodiversity, and climate change. In so doing the course engages such themes as sustainable development and environmental justice and explores various perspectives on nature-society relations. (2)

PSCI 381. Constitutional Law. An examination of the American constitutional system, with special emphasis given to the role of judicial institutions and the impact of Supreme Court decisions.

PSCI 382. Media & Public Opinion. This course explores the interrelationship between the mass media (including print, broadcast, and new media), public opinion, and American politics. Prerequisite: PSCI 135 or equivalent.

PSCI 383. Religion and American Politics. An assessment of the role of religion in American politics, focusing especially on the contemporary era. Particular attention is given to the role of evangelicals. Periodic.

PSCI 384. The Presidency. Examines the role of the presidency in the U.S. political system, focusing on such themes as leadership, decision-making, and Congressional-Executive relations. Alternate years.

PSCI 385. Urban Politics. An analysis of the politics of urban areas, including relationships with state and national governments, decision-making, and urban public policy. Diversity designation. (2)

PSCI 386. Congress and the Policy Process. An examination of the role of Congress in the American political process, including historical development, structure and functions, and decision-making. Recommended for those seeking Washington internships. Alternate years.

PSCI 387. Law and Religion. This course is designed to introduce students to the moral, legal, and constitutional questions surrounding religion and its place in democratic public life. Students will have an opportunity to gain a familiarity with the development of American constitutional law as it relates to religion, explore the alternatives to those developments, understand the contending side of contemporary controversies, and articulate their own considered views on each via both presentations and writing exercises.

PSCI 494x. Senior Seminar. An analysis of the interrelationship of politics and the Christian faith, focusing on conceptual, legal, and domestic public policy issues. Senior majors only. See IR 494. (2)

PSCI 495. Independent Study. A guided individual reading and research problem. Junior and senior majors, or discretion of professor. (2-4)

PSCI 496. Internship. A series of programs designed for practical experience in professions frequently chosen by Political Science majors, such as law, government, and public service. Prerequisite: Political Science major with junior or senior standing and a minimum of 16 credits in the department.

PSCI 499. Honors Thesis. An independent research project requiring original research, developed into a scholarly paper and culminating in an oral examination. By application only. The honors thesis may not be counted toward the total hours to complete the major. Prerequisite: PSCI 342 Research Methodology.

International Relations

Trends toward interdependence and globalization through greater integration and expansion of world markets have provided opportunities for international cooperation and conflict. The increased importance of international relationships between governments, corporations, and nongovernmental organizations has created a considerable demand for individuals trained to understand this complex environment. The major in International Relations stresses integrated knowledge in the areas of politics, economics, history, and languages. The International Relations major provides focused training for students who plan to work in a wide variety of international career fields, including international affairs, international business, area studies, development work, international law, and graduate study in foreign affairs, international relations, and comparative politics.

Requirements for the International Relations major are 30 hours plus 16 hours of supporting courses for a total of 46 hours. Core requirements of 14 hours are IR 155 Comparative Politics, IR 175 International Politics, IR 494 Senior Seminar, IR 496 Internship and a zero credit overseas experience (of at least 5 weeks) approved by the department; Major electives include 4 hours of International Politics (IR 371-409), 4 hours Comparative Politics (IR 351-362 or 412-415), 4 hours of Economics (B EC 212, 331, 347, 365, 366, 371 or 456), and 4 hours of History (HIST 292, 331, 334, 349 or 361). Six hours of Research Methods (PSCI 215 and MATH 263 or a department-approved equivalent) may replace 4 hours of either Economics or History. IR 379 International Political Economy may be either an economics or an international politics elective.

Required supporting courses are PSCI 135 American Politics and Government, BEC 211 Principles of Microeconomics and eight hours or its equivalent of a modern foreign language beyond the 201 level as determined/approved by the Foreign Language Department. For IR majors meeting the requirement via off-campus coursework, all eight hours must consist of target language instruction, and at least four hours must be at the third-year (fifth semester) level or above. Transfer courses must have the prior approval of the department chair. Once a student is admitted to the major, all core requirements must be taken at Wheaton.

Requirements for an International Relations minor are 20 hours including IR 155, 175, and 12 hours of courses from the approved list of electives. A maximum of 4 hours history and 4 hours economics may count toward IR minor.

International Relations Courses (IR)

IR 155. Comparative Politics. An introduction to the comparative analysis of the political systems of nations around the world. Attention will focus on political processes and political institutions. Examples will be drawn from nation-states in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, the former Soviet Union , and the Islamic world. Diversity designation.

IR 175. International Politics. An introduction to the politics among nations. Themes emphasized include: international security, diplomacy, conflict resolution and war, human rights, international law and organization, and global political economy.

IR 331. International Experience. A department-approved five week or longer continuous, cross-cultural experience residing outside the United States. (0)  

IR 335. International Trade and Finance. This course analyses International economic and monetary relations among countries. Studies and trade theory and policy; International payments crisis and stabilization policy; Exchange rate policy; debt issues, international policy coordination.

IR 342x. Research Methodology. See PSCI 342.

IR 351. Topics in Comparative Politics. Selected topics, designed to give added breadth and depth to the understanding of comparative politics. ( 4)

IR 352. Topics in Comparative Politics. Selected topics, designed to give added breadth and depth to the understanding of comparative politics. (2)

IR 353. Comparative Public Policy. An examination of key public policies, such as health, education, environment, and family in advanced industrial democracies. (2)

IR 354. African Politics. Investigates the political history and current regimes of African states. Special emphasis is given to the dual processes of democratization and development. Diversity designation.

IR 355. Latin American Politics. A survey of the political values, practices, and institutions in major Latin American states, with special emphasis on opportunities and impediments to political development.

IR 356. European Politics. A comparative assessment of the politics and government of selected European nations.

IR 357. Third World Politics and Development. A comparative examination of the nature and processes of political change and development in Third World countries. Emphasis is given to the political economy of national development.

IR 359. Forgiveness and Political Reconciliation. This class explores the potential role of forgiveness in confronting and overcoming systemic regime crimes. The course emphasizes theory and case studies and focuses on processes that foster political reconciliation. (2)

IR 361. Post-communist Politics. A comparison of the post-communist political development of a select number of Central and East European states. Examination is given to both the common “Leninist legacies” of communism and the great diversity of political practice now found across the region. Special emphasis is given to political institutions, European Union integration, and select contemporary political issues.

IR 362x. Global Cities: Cities in the World. See PSCI 362.

IR 371. Topics in International Politics. Selected topics, designed to give added breadth and depth to the understanding of international politics. (4)

IR 374. Topics in International Politics. Selected topics, designed to give added breadth and depth to the understanding of international politics. (2)

IR 372. International Law. Analyzes the nature and role of law in the international community through leading case studies. (2)

IR 376. Ethics and Foreign Policy. An examination of the role of moral values in foreign policy, with special emphasis on war, human rights, and foreign intervention. Prerequisite: IR 175. (2)

IR 378. U.S. Foreign Policy. An analysis of the processes and institutions involved in making U.S. foreign policy. Emphasis given to understanding the development of contemporary issues. Prerequisite: IR 175 or approval of instructor.

IR 379. International Political Economy. An analysis of the interaction of economics and politics at the international level. Topics covered will include the origins and nature of the World Bank, IMF and WTO, regionalization, trade policy, and the world monetary system. Prerequisite: B EC 211.

IR 382. Global Warming Politics. This course examines the problems, politics, and policies of climate change in light of its impacts upon marginalized and vulnerable populations in developed countries. Some of the assigned authors write from these perspectives..(2)

IR 385. Politics of Humanitarian Intervention. Humanitarian interventions of various sorts have become commonplace in this era of globalization. This course will examine the goals and consequences of humanitarian interventions around the world with specific emphasis on their political intentions and impact. Pre-requisite: IR 175. (2)

IR 412. Islam and Politics. This seminar course focuses on central Islamic concepts relating to politics and the role of Islam in political movements and individual political action. Pre-requisite: IR 155. Diversity designation.

IR 415. Nationalism & Ethnic Conflict. A comparative examination of ethnic identity as a motivation for political behavior in the modern world. Prerequisite: IR 155.

IR 494. Senior Seminar. An analysis of the interrelationship of politics and the Christian faith, focusing on international and comparative issues. Senior majors only. (2)

IR 495. Independent Study. A guided individual reading and research problem. Junior and senior majors, or discretion of professor. (2-4)

IR 496. Internship. A series of programs designed for practical experience in professions frequently chosen by International Relations majors, such as law, government, and public service. Prerequisite: International Relations major with junior or senior standing and a minimum of 16 credits in the department.

IR 499. Honors Thesis. An independent research project requiring original research, developed in a scholarly paper and culminating in an oral examination. By application only. The honors thesis may not be counted toward the total hours to complete the major.

Revision Date: June 1, 2013

 

 

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