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Intercultural Studies

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Departmental Mission Statement

Degree Requirements

M.A. in Intercultural Studies

Certificate in Urban Mission

M.A. in Intercultural Studies and Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

Intercultural Studies and Missions Course Descriptions

M.A. in Evangelism and Leadership

Evangelism and Leadership Course Descriptions

M.A. in Missional Church Movements

Missional Church Movement Course Descriptions

 

Chair, Director of Intercultural Studies and Missions, Associate Professor Robert Gallagher

Director of Evangelism & Leadership and Missional Church Movements, Associate Professor Rick Richardson

Director of TESOL, Associate Professor Alan Seaman

Professor Scott Moreau

Associate Professors Susan Greener, Cheri Pierson

 

Intercultural Studies is a multifaceted discipline demanding the highest form of professional competence and expertise in a number of specialized areas. As a department our educational mission is to develop Christian professionals who are skilled in theory and practice for culturally relevant service in a constantly changing world.

The Intercultural Studies program, leading to a Master of Arts degree, offers five separate degrees in four programs. Each provides preparation for culturally relevant service from a theological foundation combined with a multidisciplinary approach. The graduate will be equipped with both a conceptual framework and appropriate professional skills for successful service. Access to the course offerings of undergraduate and other graduate programs at Wheaton enables the integration of intercultural studies with areas of specialization.

Students in this department typically plan to begin or continue service in a variety of areas such as English language teaching, leadership development, community health and development, theological education, and pastoral or parachurch leadership in evangelism, church planting, and church growth.

The Billy Graham Center offers special scholarships to international students, furloughing missionaries, missionary candidates who are committed to overseas service under an established mission agency, and those called to evangelistic ministries who are committed to service in urban settings. The Billy Graham Center provides extensive research facilities for missions and evangelism studies. Close proximity to mission agencies, local ministries, and evangelistic outreaches in the metropolitan Chicago area enables students to relate classroom experiences to relevant ministries.

Degree Requirements

The department offers four †specialized degree programs for an M.A.: 1) Evangelism and Leadership, 2) Intercultural Studies or Missions, and 3) Intercultural Studies and Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages, and 4)) Missional Church Movements.

A comprehensive examination for all degree programs in the department is required unless the student chooses to write a thesis. In addition, full-time students are required to enroll in INTR 691, a non-credit intercultural studies forum, each semester they are in residence.

Our programs are professional ones aimed at preparing students for intercultural Christian service. Thus, continued enrollment in the degree program requires that students exhibit the presence of essential professional skills and dispositions, as well as demonstrate a commitment to growth in Christian virtues and cultural sensitivity. When a student submits an application for candidacy, the department faculty considers not only academic criteria but also the studentís commitment to personal growth and fitness for ministry.

M.A. in Intercultural Studies

Director, Robert Gallagher

Our mission for these degree tracks in the Intercultural Studies department is to develop effective cross-cultural professionals who are competent communicators of Christ, sensitive to other cultures, and effective servants. The program leading to a Master of Arts degree requires 40 hours of course work. The graduate six-hour Biblical and Theological Studies requirement is met by taking an approved 4-hour BITH course from the approved Category I list and INTR 531. Additional required courses include INTR 514, 521, 532 (4-hour version), 561, 572, 621, and 691 for a total of 24 hours. The student will work with an advisor to determine the 16 hours of electives that best meet the student's background, interests, and goals. At least 4 hours of these electives must be taken in the department.

Certificate in Urban Mission

Coordinator, Scott Moreau

In order to receive the Certificate in Urban Mission, students must complete 24 credit hours of specialized courses. Students may choose to focus on urban mission or urban evangelism for their course of study. Those focusing on urban mission will take INTR 532 (4-hour version), 561, 621, 696 and a comprehensive exam (INTR 692). The remaining 12 credit hours of elective courses may be taken from INTR 524x, 526x, 527x, 528x, 529x, 536, , 695, 696, EVAN 545, or other courses approved by the coordinator.

Those focusing on urban evangelism must take INTR 532 (4-hour version), INTR 562 (or INTR 561), 696, EVAN 545 and a comprehensive exam (INTR 692). The remaining 12 credit hours of elective courses may be taken from INTR 524x, 526x, 527x, 528x, 529x, 536, , 621, 695, or other courses approved by the coordinator. The Certificate in Urban Mission can only be †earned together with the M.A. in Intercultural Studies or M.A. in Evangelism and Leadership to provide a solid foundation for contextualized Christian service in urban areas. Students taking the Certificate in Urban Mission simultaneously with the M.A. in Intercultural Studies are exempted from taking INTR 521 for their degree program. Students taking the Certificate in Urban Mission simultaneously with the M.A. in Evangelism and Leadership are exempted from taking EVAN 573 for their degree program.

M.A. in Intercultural Studies and Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

Director, Alan Seaman

Our mission for this degree program in the Intercultural Studies department is to develop specialists in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages who demonstrate a high level of professionalism as the foundation for cross-cultural work. The requirement for this Master of Arts degree is 40 hours of course work. The graduate six-hour Biblical and Theological Studies requirement is met by taking an approved 4-hour BITH course from the approved Category I list and INTR 531. Additional required courses include INTR 561, 573, 611, 612, 613, 614, 615, 616, 617, 619 and 691 for a total of 32 hours. The student will work with an advisor to determine the eight hours of electives that best meet the student's background, interests, and goals.

This professional credential is designed to prepare English language teachers for positions in a wide variety of settings in the US and other countries. The stateside opportunities include teaching ESL in colleges and universities, language institutes, company-sponsored programs, and centers for new immigrants and refugees. Opportunities abroad include teaching English as a Foreign Language (EFL) in colleges and universities, national secondary and elementary schools, language institutes, and international schools.

The M.A. in Intercultural Studies and TESOL provides a solid foundation in ESL/EFL teaching, including courses in all of the major areas of the field. The required courses meet the standards for professional preparation established by TESOL, Inc., the international agency for English language teachers. Supervised teaching experiences focus on a broad range of instructional skills useful for a variety of classroom situations.

Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

In order to receive the Certificate in TESOL, students must complete 24 credit hours of specialized courses. Required courses are INTR 563, 611, 612, 613, 614, 615, 616, 617, 619, and 618 or another approved TESOL elective. Each student's program is worked out individually in consultation with an advisor.

For students who have already earned an elementary, middle, or secondary teaching certificate, the Certificate in TESOL meets all of the requirements for an ESL endorsement or approval in the state of Illinois and most other states. The TESOL Certificate may also be earned along with one of the other M.A. degrees offered at Wheaton College (such as the M.A. in Christian Formation and Ministry) to provide a solid foundation for using English teaching in conjunction with a ministry.

HEOA Disclosures: During the last 5 years, the TESOL Certificate has had a 75% completion rate with no graduating students having reportable debt upon graduation. Graduates typically work as TESOL instructors and aides in public education, relief agencies, and/or private enterprise (SOC job code 25-3090). Several graduates work overseas for missions organizations.

Intercultural Studies and Missions Courses (INTR)

INTR 503. Academic Composition and Communication. Group and individual instruction in expository writing and oral communication skills for students from non-English backgrounds. Students receive intensive preparation in English for academic purposes such as research papers and class presentations. Graded pass/fail. (0)

INTR 504. Perspectives in Global Outreach. An integrated introductory survey of the crucial issues in missions from the perspectives of theology, history, communication, cultural anthropology, and intercultural studies. Students have an opportunity to explore their relevant mission concerns within life and mission contexts. (2)

INTR 512x. Theories and Principles of Counseling. See PSYC 512.

INTR 514. Spiritual Formation and Witness. Explores the study and practice of effective models and methods for personal evangelism and spiritual formation, with particular emphasis on the role of relationships and small groups in evangelism and spiritual formation, and on the role of the Holy Spirit. (2)

INTR 516. Issues and Trends in Missions. Current missiological issues and trends, including church-mission relationships, changes in mission strategies and structures, challenges to the church, and their significance to the worldwide mission of the church. Opportunity for individual student research in a particular area of interest is provided. (2 or 4)

INTR 521. Historical Foundations. Explores key persons and movements in the expansion of the Christian church from early monasticism and the Celtic Church to Moravianism and Methodism. The missiological reinterpretation of church history focuses on the dynamics of the expansion and the implications for contemporary strategies of mission. Attention is given to the means of Holy Spirit renewal, structure of mission, the role of leadership, and the relationship among the three. (2)

INTR 522. Contemporary Mission History. Explores key persons and movements in the expansion of the Protestant church from William Carey to Amy Carmichael, to the Student Volunteer Movement and Pentecostalism. The missiological reinterpretation of church history focuses on the dynamics of the expansion and implications for contemporary strategies of mission. Attention is given to the use of primary source materials for historical research. (2)

INTR 524x. Chicago II: Contemporary Issues and Controversies. See URBN 351. Offered in Chicago

INTR 526x. Global Cities: Cities and the World. See IR 362.

INTR 527x. Small Scale Enterprises and Economic Development. See B EC 371. Prerequisite for B EC 371 applies.

INTR 528x. Urban Economics. See B EC 347.

INTR 529x. Advanced Urban Studies Seminar. See URBN 494. (2)

INTR 531. Theological Foundations. Using the principles of biblical exegesis and hermeneutics, the course explores God's mission from the Philistines of Abraham's and David's time, to the marginalized in New Testament society. Through this process, an appreciation is developed for theological reflection in Christian community that will impact the student's missionary vocation. (2)

INTR 532. Contextualization. Analysis of the encounter of the gospel with culture within the framework of the behavioral sciences. Organized around six dimensions of religious experience and contextualization within those dimensions, with special focus on the theological dimension.

INTR 534. Mission in Acts. The course models a historical critical interpretation of Acts. Through an analysis of the discourse structure of Luke/Acts, the course seeks to deepen an understanding of the person and work of the Spirit of Jesus who empowers God's mission as it takes place through the apostles and the early church.

INTR 535. Holy Spirit and Mission. The course explores the dynamics of the work of the Holy Spirit and mission in relation to the following dimensions: personal, biblical, historical, cultural, contextual, and functional. Students are encouraged to explore their mission philosophy regarding the role of the Spirit of God for their mission context. (2 or 4)

INTR 536. Theology of Development in World Perspective. The biblical basis for community development and the Christian's involvement in Majority World development on the personal and systemic levels. (2 or 4)

INTR 545. Dynamics of Church Growth. A survey of the crucial factors in church growth, including an analysis of the theological, sociological, and missiological elements. (2 or 4)

INTR 546. Evangelism and Church Planting. Strategies for evangelism and church development are examined and applied through case studies, field trips, contacts with resource persons, and student-led projects. (2 or 4)

INTR 548x. Discipleship. See EVAN 546. (2)

INTR 551x. Counseling Challenges in Ministry. See PSYC 551. (2)

INTR 552. Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Gender and Leadership. An exploration of the role of women in missions, including their impact on mission strategies, their unique contributions, and a discussion of critical issues they have faced since the time of the modern missionary movement. (2)

INTR 556. Foundations of Leadership Development. Explores the biblical foundations and practical implications of leadership. Based on Jesus' model of leadership development, the course seeks to encourage a balanced lifestyle in the physical, intellectual, social, and spiritual dimensions. Students explore their own development and the implications that emerge from the study. (2 or 4)

INTR 561. Intercultural Communication. Foundational principles of intercultural communication from the fields of social psychology, cultural anthropology, and communication theory integrated with selected areas of personal encounter in cross-cultural settings.

INTR 562. Foundations of Intercultural Communication. Foundational principles of intercultural communication from the fields of social psychology, cultural anthropology, and communication theory. (2)

INTR 563. Cross-Cultural Teaching and Learning. Contributions of nonformal educators, cognitive psychologists, and educational anthropologists to cross-cultural teaching and learning; attuning instruction to thinking styles, pedagogical expectations, and cultural values. (2)

INTR 565. Folk Religions. Strategies for understanding folk religion and relating to folk religion adherents are examined and applied through discussion, case studies, media, and student-led projects. (2 or 4)

INTR 567. Spiritual Conflict. An examination of the principles and dynamics of spiritual conflict. Issues include theoretical considerations in the areas of theological reflection and cultural analysis, pragmatic considerations such as spiritual discipline and counseling approaches, and the missiological implications for missionary strategies. (2 or 4)

INTR 571. Film and Mission. Uses the medium of film to reflect on the relationship between mission and culture. Considers a broad cross-section of film genres to open new and creative windows for understanding and communicating the Christian faith in a pluralistic, post-Christian culture. Assists the student in thinking critically about film from a cross-cultural perspective. (2 or 4)

INTR 572. Cross-Cultural Research. The rationale and methodology of qualitative research in cross-cultural contexts. Special focus on the application of qualitative methods to a specific context through research projects. (2 or 4)

INTR 573. Qualitative Research for Second Language Educators. A survey of qualitative research techniques for use in cross-cultural contexts, with a special focus on second language education. (2)

INTR 581x. Spanish American Culture and Civilization. See SPAN 335.

INTR 587x. East Asian History. See HIST 334.

INTR 588. Asian Culture and Communication. An introduction to Asian history and culture with particular emphasis on the themes/issues of the 20th century. Includes an introduction to a relevant Asian language and language-learning strategies. Principles for effective cross-cultural communication and adjustment are also considered. Taught in Asia. (2)

INTR 591x. Public Health and Nutrition. See BIOL 381. (2)

INTR 592x. Faith and Business Enterprise. See B EC 329. (2)

INTR 601. Introduction to TEFL Methodology. An introduction to the key concepts and skills involved in teaching English as a foreign language (EFL) in Asian classrooms. The course provides a model-based introduction to methods for teaching English as a foreign language with a specific focus on oral communication. Taught in Asia. (2)

INTR 608. Second Language Acquisition. Principles and skills for the successful learning of foreign languages, including practical instruction in phonetics and language-learning strategies.

INTR 609. Linguistic Science. See LING 321. (2)

INTR 611. Theoretical Foundations of TESOL Methodology. Survey of theory and research relevant to the teaching and learning of English as a second/foreign language. Emphasis on practical applications from linguistics, psycholinguistics, and sociolinguistics.

INTR 612. Descriptive English Grammar for TESOL. A survey of English grammar and discourse analysis, including practical issues and procedures involved in teaching grammar and discourse to ESL/EFL learners.

INTR 613. TESOL Classroom Dynamics Practicum. A survey of current research and methodology related to classroom instruction. Includes an analysis of the studentís teaching skills in a supervised field placement. Appropriate for both inexperienced and experienced teachers, as well as TESOL administrators. (2)

INTR 614. Curriculum and Materials Development for TESOL. Principles and practices in the development of curricula for ESL/EFL courses, textbook evaluation, and the management of English language teaching programs. (2)

INTR 615. Teaching Reading and Composition to ESL/EFL Learners. Theoretical and practical issues involved in teaching reading and composition, including procedures for planning and implementing classroom instruction. (2)

INTR 616. English Phonology for ESL/EFL Teachers. The sound system of English, including procedures for planning and implementing pronunciation instruction for ESL/EFL learners. (2)

INTR 617. Principles of ESL/EFL Assessment. Theoretical and practical aspects of ESL/EFL testing, including 1) survey of test types, and 2) procedures for test planning, construction, administration, and interpretation of results. Prerequisite: (2)

INTR 618. Teaching ESL to Children, K-12. Contemporary issues and practices in teaching children from non-English-speaking backgrounds, both in the U.S. and abroad. (2)

INTR 619. Teaching Speaking and Listening to ESL/EFL Learners. Specialized training in ESL teaching methods related to oral communication. Includes techniques for the analysis of oral discourse and current methodology related to language-learning strategies and the use of media. (2)

INTR 621. Principles of Development. An examination of basic principles of development through a survey of the literature and case studies from the field. Theory of development is integrated with implications for practice. (2 or 4)

INTR 631. Principles of TESOL Teacher Mentoring. This course promotes a deeper understanding of how to engage teachers in conversations and activities that encourage professional growth. Teacher mentors will learn how to observe and give feedback to novice teachers and how to make use of a variety of professional development strategies. Taught in Asia. (2)

INTR 632. Seminar in TESOL Teacher Mentoring. This course helps teacher mentors identify and solve problems within their teaching context. Mentors will develop an understanding of the broad context of education and language education in the country and region where they work and will apply this knowledge as they guide teachers. The mentors will also become skilled at helping teachers conduct research as a means of understanding and solving problems in their classrooms. Taught in Asia. (2)

INTR 633. Practicum in Teacher Mentoring. Practical experience in teacher mentoring, including observing and giving feedback to teachers, advising them in lesson planning and classroom dynamics, and counseling them about their future teaching situation. Taught in Asia. (2)

INTR 634. Adult ESL Literacy. Problems and issues in adult literacy, with a specific focus on methodology for teaching immigrants, refugees, and other English language learners, both in the US and abroad.(2)

INTR 635. Principles of Materials Development for TESOL. Students will gain an understanding of the fundamental terminology, concepts and processes involved in the development of textbooks and other published materials, including web-based and audiovisual materials for English language teaching. (2)

INTR 636. Practicum in Materials Development. Students will develop materials for an existing project through a step-by-step process which is modeled during a series of class sessions. This will lead to a more extensive individual materials development project for an organization or publisher, under the guidance of the professor or a mentor. (2)

INTR 637. Problems and Issues in TESOL Materials Development. Students will present materials they have developed for a publisher or organization and will critique the materials developed by others. Discussion of current problems and issues in materials development, both theoretical and practical, will be stimulated by these presentations and the course readings. (2)

INTR 667. Leadership in Cultural Context. Explores the integration of the principles and practice of Christian leadership for cross-cultural ministry. Major issues in leadership will be examined from the lives of biblical characters in a cross-cultural context to determine appropriate types of action for Christian leaders. Fosters community exegetical and hermeneutical methodology to inform contemporary mission praxis and give students the opportunity to develop skills and methods for leadership. (2 or 4)

INTR 681. Evangelism and Church Growth in Contemporary China. The growth and development of the Church in the People's Republic of China from 1949 to the present, as viewed against a backdrop of widespread social and political change. Includes the impact of the gospel on China's minority nationalities and current opportunities for ministry among Chinese in China, as well as those in diaspora. (2 or 4)

INTR 682. Facing the Twenty-First Century: Social Change and Mission in Post-Mao China. Examines China's drive to modernize and the ramifications for China's Asian neighbors and for the West. Includes the origins and effects of post-Mao reforms, China within the global economy, the "greater China" concept, the impact of technology upon society and the environment, and the implications for the spread of the Gospel among the Chinese. (2 or 4)

INTR 683. History of Christianity in China. Protestant and Catholic missionary efforts directed toward China, beginning with the Nestorians and continuing through the Communist revolution of 1949. Examines contextualization, indigenization, the gospel's identification with foreign powers, and theological debates within the missions community. (2 or 4)

INTR 685. Chinese Intellectuals and the Gospel. A study of the unique historical factors which have made intellectuals in China a privileged, as well as a despised, segment of society. Various attempts to reach intellectuals with the gospel will be critiqued, and the current Christian movement among intellectuals and opportunities for ministry within that movement will be analyzed. (2 or 4)

INTR 691. Intercultural Studies Forum. Integration of missiology with other academic disciplines, with the student's personal growth, and with field ministries. Fee $50. Graded pass/fail. (0)

INTR 692. Comprehensive Exam. Prerequisite: submission of Candidacy form. Fee $75. Graded pass/fail. (0)

INTR 694. Seminar in Missions. In-depth study of selected topics growing out of special concerns of professors and students. (2 or 4)

INTR 695. Independent Study. (1-4)

INTR 696. Internship. Graded pass/fail. (2 or 4)

INTR 698. Applied Thesis/Thesis.

INTR 699. Applied Thesis/Thesis Continuation. See M.A. Thesis/Applied Thesis/Action Research. (0)

M.A. in Evangelism and Leadership

Director, Rick Richardson

Associate Director, Beth Seversen

Our mission for this degree track is to develop people for effective work in evangelism that is informed by critical engagement with the nature of the gospel, Christian life and thought, and the cultures of the contemporary world. The Great Commission is a call for all followers of Christ to be engaged in the process of leading people to a relationship with Christ and nurturing them in discipleship and Christian growth. This can only be done through the power of the Holy Spirit and sensitive engagement with contemporary cultural, philosophical, historical, contextual, and lifestyle realities.

The program leading to a Master of Arts degree requires 40 hours of course work. The graduate six-hour Biblical and Theological Studies requirement is met by taking EVAN 526 and an approved 4-hour BITH course from the approved Category I list. Additional required courses include EVAN 534, 542, 545, 558, 559, 573, INTR 561 (4-hour version), 691 and 692 for a total of 32 hours. Fitting the professional nature of the degree, learning in many of the courses will be done through directed field work and other experiential methodologies.

Outdoor and Adventure Leadership Concentration

Coordinator, Beth Seversen

The Outdoor and Adventure Leadership (OAL) concentration is designed for current camp ministry professionals.  In addition to normal M.A. degree program entry requirements, one year of appropriate experience in OAL work as certified by the Director of the Evangelism and Leadership Degree program is required prior to taking the initial CFM core course at Honey Rock. The courses required for the concentration are CFM 563, CFM 662, CFM 663, and CFM 664. The entry course for this concentration is CFM 563; the remaining concentration courses may be taken over a one- or two-year span. Non-OAL students can register for Honey Rock courses only by permission from the Evangelism and Leadership Director.

In order to receive the Masters in Evangelism and Leadership degree, students will also take 24 semester hours of Evangelism and Leadership courses, including EVAN 526, 534 (or substitute approved by the Program Coordinator), 542, 545, 559, 573, INTR 691 (0-credit forum for residential full-time students only), 692, and one Biblical and Theological Studies Requirement Category I course. 

Arrow Leadership Partner Program

Coordinator, Beth Seversen

Students who have graduated from the Arrow Leadership Program prior to admission may choose to enter the Arrow Leadership Partner Program. Through an arrangement between Wheaton College and the Arrow Leadership Program, upon 1) successful completion of EVAN 542: Church: Movements and Models and 2) recommendation of the Program Coordinator based on a paper summarizing the relevance of their Arrow work to evangelism and leadership, qualified students are granted a total of 14 semester hours of credit (10 for their Arrow Partnership work and 4 for EVAN 542) towards the completion of the M.A. in Evangelism and Leadership degree.

In order to receive the Masters in Evangelism and Leadership, students take 26 semester hours of additional courses, including:

*       EVAN 526 Gospel: Theological Perspectives on Evangelism and Renewal (4)

*       EVAN 545 Culture: Emerging and Global (4)

*       EVAN 559 Organizational and Change Leadership (4)

*       EVAN 573 Evangelism Research Methods (2)

*       INTR 561 Foundations of Intercultural Communication (4)

*       INTR 692 Comprehensive Exam (0)

*       One of the listed Theological Studies Requirement Category I courses (4)

*       Electives (4)

 

Students meet the graduate six-hour Biblical and Theological Studies requirement by taking an approved 4-hour BITH course from the approved Category I list and EVAN 526.

Evangelism and Leadership Courses (EVAN)

EVAN 516x. Spiritual Formation and Witness. See INTR 514 (2)

EVAN 526. Gospel: Theological Perspectives on Evangelism and Renewal. Examines the gospel as the good news of Godís inaugurated kingdom, with a focus on the centrality of Jesusí death and resurrection as interpretive center. Investigates the dynamic of the spread of this good news throughout Scripture and history. Explores more recent movements of renewal and revival in relation to issues of evangelism and social transformation.

EVAN 534. Apologetics in Global Context. Examines apologetics as the study and practice of establishing the plausibility of the Christian faith within particular cultures and contexts. Explores various philosophical and cultural frameworks for apologetics and then applies them to modernist, postmodern, multi-ethnic and global contexts and questions. (2)

EVAN 542. Church: Movements and Models. Explores different paradigms and models of church, paying special attention to the most recent emerging missional movements and their characteristics, impact and trajectory. Includes field trip visits and guest lecturers representing various existing models of churches and ministries. Assesses ministries using a number of different evaluative tools that are widely used. Fee $30.

EVAN 545. Culture: Emerging and Global. Explores the shape of ministry and evangelism in postmodern, post-Christendom and globalizing cultures. Examines popular culture in the U.S. as a key context for ministry and a critical influence around the world. Reframes evangelism, apologetics, preaching, healing, and discipleship in relation to the significant cultural shifts that are occurring.

EVAN 546. Discipleship and Small Groups. Studies the biblical principles of disciple-making. Special attention will be given to analyzing and evaluating existing programs of discipleship and follow-up. (2)

EVAN 547. Evangelistic Communication. Exposes students to the dynamics of communication and communication theory, with application to the task of communicating the gospel in contemporary contexts. The theological, conceptual, and practical role of media, drama, the arts, metaphor, and symbol will also be explored. (2)

EVAN 548. Evangelism and the Local Church. Explores the theology, strategies, practice, and leadership styles associated with implementing evangelism through a variety of ecclesiological traditions and local church settings.

EVAN 556. Leadership and Evangelism. Examines the literature on personal leadership development, biblically and in contemporary contexts, with application to the task of leading the church or Christian agencies into evangelistic effectiveness. Special attention is given to devise or revise the mission and vision of a Christian organization seeking to be missional. (2)

EVAN 558. Personal Development and Leadership. Examines the theological, theoretical, and practical foundations for leadership in relation to personal development, stages of development over the life cycle, spiritual disciplines, personal witness, and the leaderís relational skills and practices.

EVAN 559. Organizational and Change Leadership. Explores the processes, stages, and leadership capacities and skills for leading change in organizations. Examines biblical and theological perspectives on leadership, organizations and change. Introduces principles of social entrepreneurship. Equips students for leading churches and organizations toward becoming missional and evangelistic.

EVAN 573. Evangelism Research Methods. Equips students with the rationale and methodology of qualitative research in cultural contexts, with an emphasis on the application of qualitative methods to a specific context through research projects. (2)

EVAN 691. Ministry Practicum. Provides practical, guided ministry experience in which students serve under supervision with regular interaction and instruction in the area of ministry. Graded pass/fail. (2)

EVAN 694. Seminar in Evangelism. In-depth study of selected topics growing out of special concerns of professors and students. (2 or 4)

EVAN 695. Independent Study. (1 to 4)

EVAN 696. Internship. Graded pass/fail. (2 or 4)

EVAN 698. Applied Thesis/Thesis. (2 or 4)

EVAN 699. Applied Thesis/Thesis Continuation. See M.A. Thesis/Applied Thesis/Action Research. (0)

M.A. in Missional Church Movements

Director, Rick Richardson

Associate Director, Beth Seversen

Our mission for this degree track is to develop people for effective work in planting and building reproducing missional churches, ministries, and movements that reflect a critical engagement with the nature of the gospel, Christian life and thought, and the cultures of the contemporary world. The Great Commission is a call for all followers of Christ to be engaged in the process of leading people to a relationship with Christ, nurturing them in discipleship and Christian growth, and involving them in expressions of Godís people on Godís mission. This can only be done through the power of the Holy Spirit and sensitive engagement with contemporary cultural, philosophical, historical, contextual, and lifestyle realities.

The program leading to a Master of Arts degree requires 40 hours of course work. The graduate six-hour Biblical and Theological Studies requirement is met by taking EVAN 526 and an approved 4-hour BITH course from the approved Category I list. Additional required courses include MISS 562, 564, 565, 568, and 575 or 576, EVAN 542, 545, 559, INTR 561, 691, and 692 for a total of 36 hours. Fitting the professional nature of the degree, learning in many of the courses will be done through directed field work, field trips, and other experiential methodologies. The degree must be completed within five years.

Missional Church Movement Courses (MISS)

MISS 562. Launching Apostolic Movements. Focuses on developing an overview of what constitutes a missional movement by gaining a working understanding and analysis of the key elements that have often coalesced in order to catalyze missional movements in Western and majority world contexts, both historically and in more contemporary times.

MISS 564. Planting and Growing Reproducing Churches. Investigates models, principles, strategies, and methodologies for planting new churches in North America that have an apostolic ethos of continual reproduction. Surveys Biblical materials on church planting, examines the recent literature and resources, and explores networks of church planting organizations and churches. (2)

MISS 565. Incarnational Ministry for Missional Churches. Explicates the basic components of missional communities, including communion, community and mission, that emphasize entering into communities and cultures and sectors of society, rather than drawing people out of their communities, contexts, and roles into siloed religious communities. (2)

MISS 568. Organic and Simple Church. Explores the dynamics of cell, simple, organic, and house church movements both here in North America and in other parts of the world. Special attention will be paid to multiplication factors, contextual influences, resourcing issues, organizational centralization and decentralization forces, and leadership patterns. (2)

MISS 575. Urban Missional Movements. Examines creative urban missional reproducing movements, paying special attention to the unique opportunities, challenges, and contexts of larger urban communities. Students will gain a knowledge of urban contexts, and explore ways the church can interact with those contexts in missional engagement. (2)

MISS 576. Missional Movements and Evangelism. Explores a research based understanding of various missional expressions and movements, learning to assess strengths and weaknesses of the various movements and expressions, and examining effective and ineffective evangelism dynamics. (2)

Revision Date: June 1, 2013

 

 

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