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Foreign Languages

Visit Department website

 

Departmental Mission Statement

 

Chinese

                Course Descriptions

French

                Requirements for Major

                Secondary Education Requirements

                Requirements for Minor

                Course Descriptions

German

                Requirements for Major

                Secondary Education Requirements

                Requirements for Minor

                Course Descriptions

Spanish

                Requirements for Major

                Secondary Education Requirements

                Requirements for Minor

                Course Descriptions

Ancient Languages

                Requirements for Major

                Requirements for Minor

                Greek Course Descriptions

                Hebrew Course Descriptions

                Latin Course Descriptions

Supporting Courses

                Linguistics Course Description

 

Chair, Associate Professor Sheri Abel

Gerald F. Hawthorne Professor of New Testament Greek and Exegesis, Karen H. Jobes

Professor Alan Savage

Associate Professors Michael Graves, Grant Henley, Christine Kepner, Jon Laansma, Phyllis Mitchell, Doug Penney, Nestor Quiroa, Clinton Shaffer

Assistant Professors Timothy Klingler, Mark Thorne, Tamara Townsend

Visiting Assistant Professor Sharenda Barlar

Instructor Rose Wang

 

The Foreign Languages Department prepares students for a major or minor in both ancient (Greek, Latin and Hebrew) and modern (French, German and Spanish) languages. The department also offers general education instruction in Mandarin Chinese. The goals of our programs are threefold:

Develop linguistic proficiency.

For the ancient languages this means the ability to read Greek with relative ease (Hebrew and Latin are optional), and to develop exegetical skills. For the modern languages this means attaining an advanced level of competency in the areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing.

Develop cultural proficiency.

Courses in the ancient language section introduce students to the various cultures and civilizations of the Ancient Near East, from the Neolithic through the Koiné period. Emphasis is given to translation and understanding of texts of the Old and New Testaments, as well as to classical and non-canonical texts.

Courses in Chinese, French, German and Spanish introduce students to the issues and lifestyles of contemporary society in the target cultures. French, German, and Spanish sections also introduce students to the literary, historical, artistic, and religious development of the language regions via study of representative works of various literary and textual genres and related art and cultural forms

Develop a thoroughly Christian worldview.

The Foreign Languages Department exists to prepare graduates to serve the church and society by fostering clear communication and cultural understanding. Study in foreign languages promotes growth, appreciation and understanding of God's work among peoples and cultures by engaging students with persons and texts from cultures different from their own, whether ancient or modern. Study abroad for modern language students provides opportunity for experiential learning. Through this process students enhance their awareness of their own linguistic, cultural, and religious heritage, while learning to relate with respect and consideration to persons from diverse backgrounds as enlightened citizens of the world and as worthy representatives of the kingdom of Jesus Christ.

The essence of a liberal arts education is to interact with all of God's world from a Christian perspective. Foreign Language study equips students to do so especially well by challenging them to master a language, to grasp concepts and to shape their own, to ask significant questions and seek answers, to develop original ideas, and to become intellectually self-motivated, life-long learners and servants of Christ. The major thus offers a solid base for further professional training. Completion of the minor provides functional ability in the second language and preparation for becoming a bilingual professional.

Chinese

Coordinator, Rose Wang

Chinese Courses (CHIN)

CHIN 101, 102. Elementary Mandarin Chinese. Beginning Chinese with emphasis on understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. Laboratory practice.

CHIN 201. Intermediate Mandarin Chinese. Reading, composition, and conversation with emphasis on the culture of China. Laboratory practice. The general education foreign language competency requirement is met by passing the final exam of this course. Prerequisite: successful completion of CHIN 102, a sufficient placement or SAT II test score, or permission of the instructor.

French

Coordinator, Alan D. Savage

Requirements for a major in French are 32 hours of courses numbered 300 or above. All students are required to take LING 321 or FREN 371; FREN 331 and 332; eight hours of French literature, at least four of which must be selected from FREN 346 or 347; and FREN 494, and must complete at least one term of study in a department-approved study abroad program in a French-speaking country. Students must complete FREN 338 and 335 or their equivalents while studying abroad. Wheaton-in-France may be used to fulfill the requirement for a term of study abroad. Students planning to teach on the secondary level are required to take FREN 371. Both FREN 346 and 347 are strongly recommended for students planning to pursue graduate study in French.

French Secondary Education required courses include: French 331, 332, 346 (or FREN 347), 371, 494, and an academic term in France. Students must also achieve at least an ‘Advanced-Low’ rating on an ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI), taken upon returning from their study abroad experience or as recommended by advisor. Please consult the Education Department for a list of Education courses and general education courses required for certification.

Requirements for a minor in French are 20 hours of French beyond the intermediate level, including 331 and 346 or 347. Other courses, which may include Wheaton-in-France, should be selected in consultation with a department advisor.

French Courses (FREN)

FREN 101, 102. Elementary French. Beginning French with emphasis on listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Laboratory work. Cannot receive credit for both 101-102 and 103.

FREN 103. Accelerated Elementary French. Intensive study of beginning French with emphasis on listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Laboratory work. Required of students with two years of high school French and of those above level two who place by test score into first semester French.

FREN 201. Intermediate French. Intermediate French with emphasis on reading, writing, and conversation in the context of French-speaking culture. The general education foreign language competency requirement is met by passing the final exam of this course. Prerequisite to any further study in French.

FREN 209. Intermediate French in France. Conversation, composition, and grammar review, with on-site experience of history and culture of France. Offered in France only. The general education foreign language competency requirement is met by passing the final exam of this course. Su 2013 (Subject to department approval.)

FREN 331. French Conversation. Intensive practice in oral and written communication with emphasis on listening comprehension and natural spoken expression based on audio tapes, videos, and readings of authentic materials.

FREN 332. French Composition. Intensive practice in written expression with emphasis upon fluency, accuracy, style, and authenticity of expression.

FREN 334. Culture and Communication. Study of French history, art, architecture, film, geography, social and economic structures; acquisition of skills useful in business. Different emphasis each year; may be repeated for credit. Diversity designation. (2)

FREN 335. French Civilization and Culture. On-site study of French history, architecture, art, politics, and society. Offered in France only. Su 2013

FREN 338. Advanced French in France. Advanced grammar, conversation, and composition, taught by native speakers in a French university setting. Course content and level variable. Offered in France only. Su 2013

FREN 346. Masterpieces of French Literature to 1800. Overview of major writers and movements from La Chanson de Roland to pre-Romanticism, with selected readings from various literary works. Offered alternate years.

FREN 347. Masterpieces of French Literature 1800 to Present. Overview of major writers and movements from pre-Romanticism to present, with selected readings from various literary works. Offered alternate years.

FREN 371. Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages. The study of various methodologies, theories, and techniques of foreign language teaching; introduction to linguistics for second-language acquisition. Practice in a variety of micro-teaching situations. Required for secondary education certification; otherwise, an elective toward major or minor.

FREN 431. Advanced Conversation. High level development of oral communication with emphasis on vocabulary acquisition and expression approaching native speech. Offered alternate years. (2)

FREN 432. Advanced Grammar and Stylistics. General grammar review and advanced study of lesser-taught structures and nuances of meaning in order to improve critical awareness of stylistics and vocabulary and to develop authenticity of expression. Offered alternate years. (2)

FREN 439. Topics in French Language and Literature. Varied subjects including genre and movement studies, culture, and advanced language. May be repeated for credit. Diversity designation. (2 or 4)

FREN 489. Topics in France. Varied subjects including literary and cultural studies. Offered in France only. (2) Su 2013.

FREN 494. Senior Seminar. Examination of literary or cultural topics from perspectives of contemporary critical theory. Students produce a major research paper that integrates faith with the subject matter.

FREN 495. Independent Study. Reading and individual study of some aspect of French culture, literature, or language. Department approval required. (1-4)

FREN 496. Internship. Department approval required. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing with French major. (2 or 4)

German

Coordinator, Clinton S. Shaffer

Requirements for a major in German are 32 hours of courses numbered 300 or above. All students are required to take LING 321 or GERM 371; GERM 341, 342, and 343 (summer “Wheaton in Germany I” program); GERM 431 or 432, and GERM 494-1 or 494-2. Elective hours may be taken either from one of the course pairings listed, or via one or more offerings of GERM 351 (“Topics in German Literature and Culture”) or GERM 492-1 or 492-2. In addition to the summer “Wheaton in Germany I” program (GERM 343), German majors must complete at least one semester of study in a department-approved study abroad program in a German-speaking country. Credits earned may be applied either to a second major (with the approval of that major department), to the German major, or (upon approval) to both. The spring-semester “Wheaton in Germany II” program may be used to fulfill the requirement for a term of study abroad. Students planning to teach on the secondary level are required to take GERM 371.

German Secondary Education required courses include: GERM 341, 342, 343, 371, 431, 432, and 494-1 or 494-2, and four additional hours of electives. While a full semester in a German-speaking country is highly recommended, the study abroad requirement for majors with a secondary education focus will be considered met via the summer Wheaton in Germany I program (GERM 343). Students must also achieve at least an ‘Advanced-Low’ rating on an ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI), upon returning from their study abroad experience or as recommended by advisor. Please consult the Education Department for a list of Education courses and general education courses required for certification.

Requirements for a minor in German are 20 hours beyond the intermediate level, including GERM 341, 342 and 343 (summer Wheaton in Germany program) and 8 additional hours to be selected in consultation with department advisor, including at least one 400-level course. GERM 431 and 432 are highly recommended, as is the spring-semester “Wheaton in Germany II” program.

German Courses (GERM)

GERM 101, 102. Elementary German. Beginning German with emphasis on understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. Laboratory practice. Cannot receive credit for both 101-102 and 103.

GERM 103. Accelerated Elementary German. Intensive study of beginning German with emphasis on understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. Laboratory work. Required of students with two years of high school German and of those above level two who place by test score into first semester German.

GERM 201. Intermediate German. Reading, composition, and conversation with emphasis on the culture of Germany. Laboratory practice. The general education foreign language competency requirement is met by passing the final exam of this course. Prerequisite to any further study in German.

GERM 209. Intermediate German in Germany. Conversation, composition, and grammar review, with on-site experience of history and culture of Germany. Offered in Germany only. The general education foreign language competency requirement is met by passing the final exam of this course.

GERM 338. Advanced German in Germany. Development of oral proficiency. Discussion and interpretation of shorter literary texts, and social and political topics. Offered in Germany only.

GERM 341. Contemporary German Culture and Mores. Introduction to institutions of contemporary German culture and society, including geography, gender relationships and the family, the church, the educational system, politics and government, minority populations, labor and economics, popular culture and media. Overview and analysis of behavioral norms and mores in the Federal Republic, coupled with comparative reference to the United States and broader German-speaking Europe. Intensive practice in oral and written communication with emphasis on listening comprehension and natural spoken expression based on audio recordings, video materials, and readings of authentic texts.

GERM 342. Contemporary German Culture: Politics, Economics, and Current Events. An exploration of contemporary German culture as mediated through German newspapers, magazines, and various online sources. Special focus on current events with an emphasis on political and economic issues in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Continued review of grammar started in GERM 341. Conducted in German.

GERM 343. “What is German?” German Cultural Identity from Charlemagne to the Berlin Republic. A survey of cultural periods and developments in German-speaking Europe from early beginnings in the Holy Roman Empire to the present day Berlin Republic with special focus on the question of German national identity. The course will investigate a variety of cultural artifacts including short prose texts, poetry, dramatic performances, film clips, select artworks, and architectural examples. Emphasis on cultural literacy and communicative expression. Offered in Germany annually during May-June Wheaton in Germany I program. Conducted entirely in German.

GERM 351. Topics in German Literature and Culture. Varied subjects, including genre, movement, and author studies, film, cultural history, or advanced language. May be repeated for credit. (4)

GERM 353. Topics in German Literature and Culture. Varied subjects, including genre, movement, and author studies, film, cultural history, or advanced language. May be repeated for credit. (2)

GERM 371. Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages. The study of various methodologies, theories, and techniques of foreign language teaching; introduction to linguistics for second-language acquisition. Practice in a variety of micro-teaching situations. Required for secondary education certification; otherwise, an elective toward major or minor.

GERM 372. German for Reading. Intensive introduction to German grammar for the special purpose of reading/translating academic prose (scholarly books and journal articles), with a particular focus on readings in theological disciplines and the humanities. Acquisition of a broad recognition vocabulary and development of basic reading comprehension abilities. Recommended for undergraduates anticipating graduate study in humanities and theological studies. Does not count toward general education foreign language competency requirement. Not open to German majors/minors without special permission. Cross-listed with BITH 505.

GERM 431. “Other” Germans: Turkish and Minority Experience. Introduction to minority and multicultural identity and cultural hybridity in contemporary Germany, Austria and Switzerland, with focus on marginal societal groups, including evangelical Christians, quasi-religious sects, and Turkish and other immigrant populations. Analysis of immigrant literary and cinematic works and overview of social challenges in immigration and asylum policy, with particular focus on “guest workers,” integration of Turkish immigrants, and Christian-Islamic relations. Meets Diversity Designation.

GERM 432. The Holocaust and Contemporary Jewish Experience. Written and oral analysis of depictions of the Holocaust in various national literary and cinematic media and of contemporary Jewish authors in the German-speaking countries; exploration of issues facing contemporary Jews in German-speaking Europe. Meets Diversity Designation.

GERM 437. Topics in German Language and Literature. Varied subjects, including genre and movement studies, film, culture, and advanced language. May be repeated for credit. (2 or 4)

GERM 489. Special Topics. Advanced study in language, literature, and civilization in Germany. Offered in Germany only. (2 or 4)

GERM 491. Practicum. Offered in Germany only. Graded pass/fail. (0-2)

GERM 492-1. Kingdoms, Revolutions, and Agents of Change: Faith, Literature, and the Social Order in Germany. Intensive seminar on secular and faith-based social transformations in Germany from Luther to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Literary readings and analysis of cinematic works, supplemented with socio-historical sources in German and English. Open to students who have taken GERM 494-2 or by permission. Offered alternate years. Cross-listed with GERM 494-1. (2).

GERM 492-2. From Doubt to Hope: Faith and its Role in German Literature from the Medieval Period to the Fall of the Third Reich. Intensive seminar with emphasis on the intersection of German literature with Christian theological perspectives from the High Middle Ages until the end of World War II. Open to students who have taken GERM 494-1 or by permission. Offered alternate years. Cross-listed with GERM 494-2. (2)

GERM 494-1. Kingdoms, Revolutions, and Agents of Change: Faith, Literature, and the Social Order in Germany. Intensive seminar on secular and faith-based social transformations in Germany from Luther to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Literary readings and analysis of cinematic works, supplemented with socio-historical sources in German and English. Students will produce a major research paper that integrates Christian faith with the subject matter. Offered alternate years. Meets Senior Capstone Requirement.

GERM 494-2. From Doubt to Hope: Faith and its Role in German Literature from the Medieval Period to the Fall of the Third Reich. Intensive seminar with emphasis on the intersection of German literature with Christian theological perspectives from the High Middle Ages until the end of World War II. Students will produce a major paper that integrates faith with the subject matter. Offered alternate years. Meets Senior Capstone Requirement.

GERM 495. Independent Study. Reading and individual study of some aspect of German culture, literature, or language. Department approval required. (1-4)

GERM 496. Internship. Department approval required. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing with German major. (2 or 4)

Spanish

Coordinator, Christine Goring Kepner

Requirements for a major in Spanish are 32 hours of courses numbered 300 or above. All students are required to take LING 321 or SPAN 371; SPAN 331, 332, 336, 337, and 494, and must complete at least one term of study in a department-approved study abroad program in a Spanish-speaking country. Wheaton-in-Spain or Wheaton-in-Latin America may be used to fulfill the requirement for a term of study abroad. Students planning to teach on the secondary level are required to take SPAN 371.

Spanish Secondary Education required courses include: Spanish 331, 332, 336, 337, 371, 494, and an academic term in a Spanish-speaking country. Students must also achieve at least an ‘Advanced-Low’ rating on an ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI), normally upon returning from their study abroad experience or as recommended by advisor. Please consult the Education Department for a list of Education courses and general education courses required for certification.

Requirements for a minor in Spanish are 20 hours beyond the intermediate level, including 331, 332, and 12 additional hours to be selected in consultation with department advisor. SPAN 336 or 337 are strongly recommended, as are Wheaton-in-Spain or Wheaton-in-Latin America.

Spanish Courses (SPAN)

SPAN 101, 102. Elementary Spanish. Beginning Spanish with emphasis on listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Introduction to aspects of culture of Spanish-speaking communities. Online drill work. Cannot receive credit for both 101-102 and 103.

SPAN 103. Accelerated Elementary Spanish. Intensive study of elementary Spanish with emphasis on listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Introduction to aspects of culture of Spanish-speaking communities. Required of students with two years of high school Spanish and of those above level two who place by test score into first semester Spanish. Online drill work.

SPAN 201. Intermediate Spanish. Conversation, composition, and grammar review based on readings and videos; exploration of various aspects of culture of Spanish-speaking communities. Online drill work. The general education foreign language competency requirement is met by passing the final exam of this course. Prerequisite to any further study in Spanish.

SPAN 331. Spanish Conversation. Intensive practice in oral communication with emphasis on listening comprehension and natural spoken expression based on videos and readings of authentic materials. Diversity designation.

SPAN 332. Advanced Grammar and Composition. Intensive grammar review and written practice in various forms to improve accuracy and authenticity of expression. Readings, films, and discussion.

SPAN 334. Spanish Civilization and Culture. On-site study of Spanish history, architecture, art, politics, and society. Offered in Spain only. Su 2014.

SPAN 335. Latin American Culture and Civilization. Readings and discussion of history, geography, political and social structures, and various forms of artistic expression particularly Latin American. Recommended for IR and Education students. Diversity designation.

SPAN 336. Survey of Spanish Literature. A general survey of Spanish literature from the beginnings of the language to the present. Examination and analysis of representative authors and genres.

SPAN 337. Survey of Spanish American Literature. A general survey of the development of Spanish American literature from the pre-Columbian period to the present. Examination and analysis of representative authors and genres. Diversity designation.

SPAN 338. Intensive Advanced Spanish. Advanced grammar, conversation, and composition taught by native speakers in Spain or a Latin American university setting. Course content and level variable. Offered in Spain (Su 2014) or Latin America (Su 2013) only. Diversity designation.

SPAN 371. Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages. The study of various methodologies, theories, and techniques of foreign language teaching; introduction to linguistics for second-language acquisition. Practice in a variety of micro-teaching situations. Required for secondary education certification; otherwise, an elective toward major or minor.

SPAN 439. Topics in Spanish Language and Hispanic Literatures and Culture. Varied subjects including genre and movement studies, film, culture, and advanced language. May be repeated for credit. (2 or 4) Diversity designation.

SPAN 489. Topics in Hispanic Culture. Varied subjects, including literary and cultural study with emphasis on Christian perspectives of Hispanic culture. Field trips. Offered only in Spain (Su 2014) or Latin America (Su 2013). (2-4)

SPAN 494. Senior Seminar. Examination of literary or cultural topics from perspectives of contemporary critical theory. Students produce a major research paper that integrates faith with the subject matter.

SPAN 495. Independent Study. Reading and individual study of selected aspect of Hispanic culture, literature, or language. Department approval required. (1-4)

SPAN 496. Internship. Department approval required. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing with Spanish major. (2 or 4)

Ancient Languages

Coordinator, Douglas Penney

Requirements for a major are 32 hours: GREK 494 and 12 hours in Greek beyond the intermediate level, chosen from GREK 331-337, 451, 487, 489 and 495; LING 321; and 14 hours chosen from: additional Greek courses; ARCH 345, 417, 418; PHIL 311; LATN 101, 102, 201, 333, 487, 489, 495; HEBR 301, 302, 401x, 487, 489; or other approved advanced courses offered in the Graduate School.

Requirements for a minor in Ancient Languages are 20 hours, including 12 hours in Greek beyond the intermediate level and 8 hours to be chosen from the courses listed above for the major.

Greek Courses (GREK)

GREK 101, 102. Elementary Greek. Intensive study of elementary grammar, syntax, and vocabulary; selected readings from Ancient Greek authors including those of the New Testament. GREK 101 is a prerequisite for GREK 102.

GREK 201. Intermediate Greek. Review of grammar and syntax accompanied by selections from various Greek authors including those of the New Testament. The general education foreign language competency requirement is met by passing the final exam of this course. Prerequisite to further work in Greek.

GREK 331, 332, 333. Advanced Classical Reading. Selections from Greek poets, philosophers, or dramatists. (2 or 4)

GREK 334, 335, 336. Advanced Koine Reading. New Testament book studies in Greek or selections from the Septuagint or the early church fathers to illustrate the development of thought within Christianity. (Cross-listed with BITH 361x and BITH 549x.) (2 or 4)

GREK 337. Greek Prose Composition. A systematic review of Greek morphology and syntax by writing sentences in Classical and Koine Greek. (2)

GREK 451x. Greek Exegesis. See BITH 451.

GREK 487. Topics in Greek Language and Literature. Varied subjects. Designated studies in specialized genres, literature, culture, comparative studies, or inter-disciplinary studies. (2)

GREK 489. Topics in Greek Language and Literature. Varied subjects. Designated studies in specialized genres, literature, culture, comparative studies, or inter-disciplinary studies.

GREK 494. Senior Capstone. Ancient Language major will take a capstone course in their senior year that connects ancient Greek with other areas of inquiry. The student will do focused research on the Greek of the classical world, including but not limited to the Septuagint and the New Testament. Students will demonstrate how their chosen topic relates to Christian faith.

GREK 495. Independent Study. Department approval required. (1-4)

Hebrew Courses (HEBR)

HEBR 301, 302. Elementary Hebrew. Basic grammar, syntax, and vocabulary with readings from the Old Testament and modern Hebrew authors. HEBR 301 is a prerequisite for 302.

HEBR 401x. Intermediate Hebrew. Review of grammar and syntax with an introduction to the Masoretic text of the Old Testament, intensive reading from selected Old Testament texts and modern writers. The general education foreign language competency requirement is met by passing the final exam of this course. See BITH 631.

HEBR 487. Topics in Hebrew Language and Literature. Varied subjects. Designated studies in specialized genres, literature, culture, comparative studies, or inter-disciplinary studies. (2)

HEBR 489. Topics in Hebrew Language and Literature. Varied subjects. Designated studies in specialized genres, literature, culture, comparative studies, or inter-disciplinary studies.

HEBR 495. Independent Study. An independent study in Hebrew which may be either advanced grammar, reading of the Hebrew Old Testament, or an exegesis of a portion of the Hebrew text of the Old Testament. Department approval required. (1-4)

Latin Courses (LATN)

LATN 101, 102. Elementary Latin. Introduction to syntax and vocabulary. Readings from representative ancient authors. LATN 101 is a prerequisite for 102.

LATN 201. Intermediate Latin. Review of grammar. Translation of extensive selections from Vergil's Aeneid and other poets. The general education foreign language competency requirement is met by passing the final exam of this course.

LATN 333. Advanced Latin Readings. In-depth readings of selections of Latin literature, focusing on the classical periods of the Roman Republic and Empire. Emphasis will be placed on universal human themes expressed in the literature that shed light on cross-cultural connections between the ancient and modern worlds. (2 or 4)

LATN 487. Topics in Latin Language and Literature. Varied subjects. Designated studies in specialized genres, literature, culture, comparative studies, or inter-disciplinary studies. (2 )

LATN 489. Topics in Latin Language and Literature. Varied subjects. Designated studies in specialized genres, literature, culture, comparative studies, or inter-disciplinary studies. (4)

LATN 495. Independent Study. Department approval required. (1-4)

Supporting Courses

Linguistics Courses (LING)

LING 321. Introduction to Linguistics. Introductory study of the concepts and methodology of modern linguistics. Survey of the various branches of linguistic science and of their relationships to other disciplines. (Cross-listed with INTR 609)(2)

LING 322. English Grammar for Teachers. A survey of major areas of English grammar with a focus on practical issues for teachers of English language learners. (2)

LING 323. Bilingual Methods and Materials. Current methodology and instructional resources for teachers of children in bilingual classrooms, programs, and schools. (Cross-listed with INTR 642.) (2)

LING 324. Theoretical Foundations of TESOL Methodology. Survey of theory and research relevant to the teaching and learning of English as a second/foreign language. Emphasis on practical applications from linguistics, psycholinguistics, and sociolinguistics. (Cross-listed with INTR 611)

LING 325. Principles of Assessment for TESOL. Theoretical and practical aspects of ESL/EFL testing, including 1) survey of test types, and 2) procedures for test planning, construction, administration, and interpretation of results. (Cross-listed with INTR 617.) (2)

LING 326. Teaching ESL to Children, K-12. Contemporary issues and practices in teaching children from non-English-speaking backgrounds, both in the U.S. and abroad. (Cross-listed with INTR 618.) (2)

LING 327. Cross-Cultural Teaching and Learning. Contributions of nonformal educators, cognitive psychologists, and educational anthropologists to cross-cultural teaching and learning; attuning the instruction of ELLs to thinking styles, pedagogical expectations, and cultural values. (Cross-listed with INTR 563.) (2)

LING 328. Classroom Methods Practicum in ESL. A survey of current research and methodology related to the classroom instruction of English language learners. This course includes an analysis of teaching skills in a supervised field placement. (Cross-listed with INTR 613.) (2)

Revision Date: June 1, 2013

 

 

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