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Education

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Departmental Mission Statement

Admission to Wheaton Teacher Education Program (WheTEP)

Initial Elementary License

Initial Secondary License

Initial Special License (Foreign Language and Music)

Course Descriptions

 

Chair, Professor Jillian Lederhouse

Associate Professors Jonathan Eckert, Paul Egeland, Mark Jonas, Il-Hee Kim, Sally Morrison

 

Reflecting the College’s mission to benefit society worldwide, the goal of the Wheaton College Teacher Education Program is to prepare educators who teach and lead for human flourishing. The concept of educating for human flourishing has ancient roots, including a strong presence in the wisdom literature of the Hebrew Bible. It first appeared in a form directly applicable to the contemporary academy in the works of Plato and Aristotle, where this goal is compatible with Christian theology in recognizing that all individuals are created in the image and likeness of God, and therefore each human being has inherent value and the capacity to learn and grow.

Human flourishing is the ethical and purposeful realization of human attributes, in mind, body, and spirit, which fits a person, as Milton said, “to perform justly, skillfully, and magnanimously all the offices of public and private life.” The work of the Christian professional educator is to instill and develop the knowledge, skills, and intellectual and moral virtues which help to actualize this potential. In order to teach for human flourishing, Christian professional educators should have a broad background in the liberal arts, expertise in the subject matter, knowledge of the ways in which children and adolescents develop and learn best, knowledge of the optimal conditions to achieve the education good, and the skills, virtues and dispositions worthy of the profession. For those who are called to serve in our state’s, nation’s, and world’s public and private schools, this mission charges teacher candidates to devote their lives wholly to Christ by faithfully and intelligently teaching each of His children to the best of their abilities.

The Department of Education has chosen teaching and leading for human flourishing on which to base its teacher preparation program for its congruence with transcendent scriptural principles, its relationship to the liberal arts, and its inherently high and holistic expectations for each student. Implicit in this model are three distinct professional and dispositional components: 1) embodying justice, 2) making reasoned and ethical decisions, and 3) acting in a Christ-like manner:

Embodying Justice

Candidates are expected to demonstrate justice in the following areas:

*       See students’ competencies and capacities in a holistic manner 

*       Create a safe learning environment

*       Hold all learners to high expectations

*       Offer a rich and rigorous curriculum to all students

*       Use evidence-based approaches and methods that reflect the research on diverse learners

*       Build strong relationships with all students, parents and guardians

Making Ethical and Reasoned Decisions

Candidates will make ethical and reasoned decisions which:

*       Empower independent student learning

*       Reflect both the breadth and depth of the curriculum

*       Emanate in part from assessment data

*       Augment their instruction through a rich variety of resources, including appropriate technologies

*       Increase students’ literacy skills in and through all areas of the curriculum

*       Consider the local and global contexts

Acting in a Christ-like Manner

Candidates will demonstrate the following dispositions:

*       (Professionalism) Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct with supervisors, students, colleagues and community

*       (Collaboration) Foster collaborative relationships that enhance the teaching and learning experience

*       (Scholarship) Demonstrate commitment to the acquisition of knowledge, skills, intellectual curiosity and moral development

*       (Problem-solving) Adjust successfully to new circumstances, are flexible in nature, accommodate given the unforeseen, and persist through adversity

*       (Initiative) Actively demonstrate the ability to foster extensions in learning and teaching

*       (Leadership) Develop effective communication skills, thinking skills and creative expression

 

In addition to the above outcomes, the Department of Education, fully supports the standards and principles promulgated by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE), and the Council for the Accreditation of Education Preparation (CAEP). The Department of Education at Wheaton College is accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Education Preparation (CAEP), 2010 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036; phone 202.466.7496. This accreditation covers Wheaton College's initial teacher preparation programs. The Department of Education's teacher preparation program is also approved by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE). The most recent approvals by both CAEP and ISBE were granted in 2007. Candidates may obtain licensure in the following areas: Elementary Education, English/Language Arts, French, German, Mathematics, Music, Science (designations in Biology, Chemistry, Earth and Space, and Physics), Social Science (designation in History), and Spanish.

Candidates graduating from the program are eligible for an Initial Teaching License in the State of Illinois following successful completion of the Test of Academic Proficiency, a content-area exam, and the Assessment of Professional Teaching. These exams are administered throughout the year at Pearson testing sites, and there is a fee for each exam. The Initial Teaching License is a fully valid license good for four years of teaching. After four years of teaching, the individual must complete additional requirements in order to earn a Standard License. Candidates planning to apply for licensure in other states should check with the Department of Education for requirements in those states. Persons convicted of committing any sex, narcotics or drug offense, attempted first degree murder, first degree murder, or a Class X felony may be denied an Illinois teaching license. In order to be licensed in Illinois, a candidate must either be a U.S. citizen or legally present and authorized for employment.

Candidates planning to teach in grades K-9 major in Elementary Education and are eligible for an Initial Elementary License. Candidates planning to teach in grades 6-12 must major in a subject area commonly taught in the public schools and Secondary Education to be eligible for an Initial Secondary License. Candidates desiring to teach music or a world language (German, French, or Spanish) major in one of these subjects and take courses and experiences to be eligible for an Initial Special License (K-12).

To be admitted to the Wheaton Teacher Education Program (WheTEP), a candidate must have a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 in the major, in professional education courses, and cumulatively. The 2.5 GPA must be maintained throughout the program. All candidates seeking licensure must earn a grade of C or better in all major, professional and endorsement subject courses. Candidates must submit a completed WheTEP application. An interview and a passing score on the Illinois Licensure Testing System Test of Academic Proficiency or waiver are required for WheTEP acceptance.

An application to student teach must be submitted by October 1 of the year prior to the college year during which they plan to student teach. Failure to submit an application to student teach by this date may result in a delay of one semester for student teaching. Evidence of a TB test is required prior to student teaching. Candidates must secure proof of a criminal background check through the district in which they will complete their student teaching. Candidates must take responsibility for their own transportation for most practicum experiences.

The Department of Education screens its candidates for appropriate dispositions to teach through two means: (a) observations and cooperating teacher ratings during clinical experiences and (b) a screening process (including the WheTEP interview) completed by professors. Formal votes to affirm appropriate dispositions are taken at two points (admission to WheTEP and admission to student teaching) during the candidate’s preparation program. Additionally, a candidate’s dispositions to teach are carefully monitored during the student teaching experience. A candidate may be denied admission to any phase of the program or be denied licensure if, in the judgment of the faculty members, he/she does not exhibit the appropriate dispositions to teach. For more information on the screening process, please see the department.

Transfer candidates should contact the Department of Education as soon as possible. No candidate will be admitted to WheTEP until he or she has been a full-time Wheaton College student for at least one semester and has completed at least one course in the Wheaton College Department of Education, accompanied by at least one practicum experience. Candidates are expected to complete all WheTEP requirements and take all 300- and 400-level education courses at Wheaton College.

Candidates pursuing elementary, secondary, or K-12 foreign language teacher licensure through Wheaton College complete the liberal arts general education requirements that apply to all students in the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degree programs. It is essential that candidates follow these requirements carefully beginning with their freshman year. Candidates are encouraged to receive credit through department exams whenever possible. Due to the number of required hours and the sequencing of some courses, candidates seeking entitlement may need to enroll for nine semesters. Credit through testing and/or enrollment in summer school may reduce the number of necessary semesters. (Note: The State of Illinois continues to review requirements; and, therefore, licensure requirements are subject to change.)

In 2013-2014, the Wheaton Teacher Education Program had 55 candidates admitted to initial teacher licensure programs. Sixty-eight (68) candidates participated in supervised student teaching during the academic year, four full-time faculty in the Department of Education spent at least part of their time supervising student teachers, six full-time faculty at Wheaton College worked part-time for the Department of Education in the supervision of student teachers, four part-time faculty at Wheaton College supervised student teachers, and seven part-time faculty not otherwise employed by Wheaton College supervised student teachers. In total, twenty-one (21) faculty supervised student teachers, a ratio of 3.24 candidates to one supervisor. Candidates participating in student teaching are required to complete 12 weeks of student teaching and complete at least 30 hours per week in the schools (360 hours). Candidates averaged 400 hours in the schools over their experiences. Current Wheaton College and statewide data are posted on our website as they become available.

Initial Elementary License (for elementary education students K-9)

Requirements for the Elementary Education major are 42 hours in education. Education courses include EDUC 135, 136, 136L, 225, 225L, 305, 305L, 311, 311L, 312, 315, 317, 321, 494, 496 and 497.

A minimum of 100 hours of clinical experiences is required prior to student teaching. This includes four required experiences: EDUC 136L, 225L, 305L, and 311L; EDUC 405L or other experiences approved by the Department of Education may also count toward the 100 hours.

Each candidate must also complete 16 hours in an approved academic concentration in a specific discipline. Concentrations may be completed in Applied Health Science, Art, Chinese, Communication, English, French, German, Linguistics (applicable to ESL or Bilingual Endorsement), Mathematics, Music, Social Science, and Spanish. Candidates should check with the Department of Education for approved courses in the concentrations. Courses used to meet general education requirements cannot be used to count toward this concentration (with some exceptions in the Humanities area).

Elementary Education majors are strongly encouraged to complete a middle grade (grades 5-8) endorsement by enrolling in EDUC 405L. Candidates may earn additional endorsements for teaching in the middle grades (5-8) by completing the following requirements: 1) 18 semester hours in the subject matter area of major teaching assignment (e.g., language arts, mathematics, general science, social science, music, etc.); 2) 3 hours of psychology focusing on the middle grade adolescent (1 hour from EDUC 225 Learning and Development: The Psychological and Developmental Contexts of Education, 1 hour from EDUC 305 Learning Differences, and 1 hour from EDUC 405L Middle Grade Practicum); 3) 6 hours of curriculum and instruction for the middle grades (1 hour from EDUC 311 Theories and Methods of Teaching Elementary and Middle School Students , 2 hours from EDUC 312 Theories and Methods: Elementary and Middle School Reading, 1 hour from EDUC 315 Theories and Methods of Teaching Elementary and Middle School Mathematics, 1 hour from EDUC 317 Theories and Methods of Teaching Elementary and Middle School Language Arts, and 1 hour from EDUC 321 Theories and Methods of Teaching Elementary and Middle School Social Studies).

Candidates planning to teach in the early elementary grades should take EDUC 304, Early Childhood Education, prior to the methods sequence.

In order to complete licensure, candidates must also take and pass the Illinois Test of Academic Proficiency, the Elementary/Middle Grades content area test, and the Assessment of Professional Teaching Exam.

Elementary candidates seeking licensure after September 1, 2017 will be entitled for grades 1-6 and be responsible for content knowledge in physical, life, and earth and space sciences as well as history, geography, civics and government, and economics in the social sciences. Candidates are advised to enroll in general education courses accordingly.

Candidates seeking a Middle Grade Endorsement after February 1, 2018 will complete 24 hours in a content field including a content specific methods course focused on the middle grades and pass the Middle Grade Content Area Exam.  See the department for specific content requirements.

Initial Secondary License (for secondary education students 6-12)

The education courses required for Secondary Education candidates (6-12) include EDUC 135, 136, 136L, 225, 225L, 305, 305L, 306, a teaching methods course in the major, EDUC 324L or 335L, 494, 496, and 497.

A minimum of 100 hours of clinical experiences is required prior to student teaching. This includes four required experiences: EDUC 136L, 225L, 305L, and 324L (335L for Math majors); 405L or other experiences approved by the Department of Education may also count toward the 100 hours.

Secondary Education candidates must complete a program in an approved major field of specialization. Currently, majors or areas approved for secondary education licensure by the State of Illinois are: English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science (Biology, Chemistry, Earth and Space, or Physics designation), and Social Science (History designation). For major requirements refer to the appropriate academic department section of this catalog.

Semester hours counted for the purpose of meeting the general education requirements may also be counted for the licensure major field of specialization.

Secondary Education candidates who do not complete EDUC 225L at a middle school setting or student teach at the middle school level must complete EDUC 405L in order to be eligible for middle school endorsement. Teacher candidates may earn additional endorsements for teaching in the middle grades by completing the following requirements: 1) 18 semester hours in the subject matter area of major teaching assignment (e.g., language arts, mathematics, general science, social science, music) 2) 3 hours of psychology focusing on the early adolescent (1 hour from EDUC 225 Learning and Development: The Psychological and Developmental Contexts of Education, 1 hour from EDUC 305 Learning Differences, and 1 hour from EDUC 225L Teacher Aiding Practicum completed in a middle school); 3) hours of curriculum and instruction for middle schools (1 hour from the appropriate departmental methods class and 2 hours from EDUC 306 Classroom Communication & Curriculum Integration)

In order to complete licensure, candidates must also take and pass the Illinois Test of Academic Proficiency, the content-area test for their major field of specialization, and the Assessment of Professional Teaching Exam. No candidate may attempt to pass the same Illinois licensure test more than five times.

Initial Special License (for Foreign Language and Music)

Initial Special License K-12 candidates must complete a program in an approved major field of specialization. Currently the majors approved for K-12 licensure by the State of Illinois are Foreign Language (French, German, or Spanish) and Music. For major requirements refer to the appropriate academic department section of this catalog.

The education courses required for Foreign Language Special License candidates (K-12) include EDUC 135, 136, 136L, 225, 225L, 324L, 305, 305L, 306, 324L, 494, 496 and 497. A minimum of 100 hours of clinical experiences is required prior to student teaching. This includes four required experiences: EDUC 136L, 225L, 305L, and 324L; EDUC 405L or other experiences approved by the Department of Education may also count toward the 100 hours.

The education courses required for the Music Special License candidates (K-12) include EDUC 135, 136, 225, 225L, 305, 305L, 494, 496, and 497. Candidates should follow the B.M.E. guidelines for completion of additional clinical experiences.

Semester hours counted for the purpose of meeting the general education requirements may also be counted for the licensure major field of specialization.

In order to complete licensure, candidates must also take and pass the Illinois Test of Academic Proficiency, the content-area test for their major field of specialization, and the Assessment of Professional Teaching for grades K-12.

ESL and Bilingual Endorsements

To earn an ESL or Bilingual Education approval or endorsement from the Illinois State Board of Education, a teacher must (1) hold a valid Illinois teaching license, (2) have ESL or bilingual clinical experience totaling 100 clock hours or three months of teaching experience with ESL students, (3) have earned credits totaling 18 semester hours in five course areas: Linguistics, Theoretical Foundations of Teaching ESL, Assessment of the Bilingual Student, Methods and Materials for Teaching ESL, Cross-Cultural Studies for Teaching LEP Students.

Undergraduate students must take the following classes in order to apply for the ESL or bilingual approval/endorsement: LING 321, LING 322, LING 323 (required for the bilingual endorsement), LING 324, LING 325, LING 326 (required for the ESL endorsement), LING 327, and LING 328. In addition, EDUC 311L/324L, EDUC 136L/225L, and/or SPAN/FREN/GERM 371 may be taken to provide additional credit hours for the endorsement. A letter from a professor is required to certify the requirement for 100 clock hours of clinical experience.

Education Courses (EDUC)

EDUC 135. The School and Society. Introductory course to provide a broad exposure to the foundations of education in the United States through history, many aspects of culture and society, theoretical concepts, current issues, and their educational implications. Explores these topics through the lenses of the Education Department conceptual framework, Teaching and Leading for Human Flourishing, which includes embodying justice, making ethical and reasoned decisions, and acting in a Christ-like manner. (2)

EDUC 136. Teaching Ethnically and Linguistically Diverse Students. The theoretical and pedagogical background necessary to provide culturally and linguistically responsive learning experiences for a diverse student population. The course includes the English Language Development (ELD) Standards and English Language Proficiency (ELP) Standards of the World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment professional organization (WIDA). Co-requisite: EDUC 136L. (2) B quad

EDUC 136L. Cross-Cultural Tutoring. A tutoring experience with students from cultural and linguistic settings different from that of the college student’s background. Most of the assignments are arranged through the Christian Service Council. Concurrent with EDUC 136. Graded pass/fail. (1)

EDUC 225. Learning and Development: The Psychological and Developmental Contexts of Education. Overview of the major theories, concepts, issues, data, and research methodologies used in understanding how children from birth through adolescence learn and grow. Various theories of learning are examined and the impact of typical growth stages on learning is assessed. Not open to freshmen without consent of instructor. Corequisite EDUC 225L or EDUC521L.

EDUC 225L. Teacher Aiding Practicum. A teacher aiding experience in a local school during the semester. Concurrent with EDUC 225. Graded pass/fail. (1)

EDUC 241. Outdoor Education. Principles of instruction in outdoor education as a teacher of elementary and middle school children. Prerequisite: (or concurrent with) EDUC 225. Taught at HoneyRock in the summer. (2 or 4) Su

EDUC 304. Early Childhood Education. The theoretical and pedagogical background for teaching children in preschool through age 8. Emphasis on the design and execution of appropriate teaching-learning experiences for children ages 3-8. Required for kindergarten and strongly recommended for those intending to teach primary-age children. Prerequisites: EDUC 135, 136, 136L, 225, 225L. (2)

EDUC 305. Learning Differences. The theoretical and pedagogical background necessary to meet the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (I.D.E.A.) and its amendments, as well as the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, including Response to Intervention (RTI). It includes instruction in the psychology of children and adolescents with exceptionalities with emphases on students who are gifted, who have learning disabilities, and English language learners. It emphasizes identification of learning needs, individualization of educational programs, differentiation of instruction, and utilization of available services. Prerequisites: EDUC 135, 136, 225, and 225L, or Department approval. (2)

EDUC 305L. Learning Differences Practicum. The candidate will observe and work with students with special needs in a school or recreational setting for approximately 30 hours. Graded pass/fail. (1)

EDUC 306. Classroom Communication & Curriculum Integration. Covers the communication processes germane to the teaching profession, which include the development of techniques in speaking, writing, and reading skills. Includes methodologies for teaching reading and writing across the curriculum with particular emphasis in middle school curriculum, as well as theory and practice for interpersonal communications, listening skills, public speaking, and instructional strategies (lecturing, questioning techniques, group processes and dynamics). Concurrent with a methods of teaching course in the major, EDUC 324L or 335L, 305, and 305L. Prerequisites: EDUC 135, 136, 136L, 225, 225L, and admission to WheTEP.

EDUC 311. Theories and Methods of Teaching Elementary and Middle School Students. An introduction to general methods of teaching elementary and middle school students, including units on the nature and curriculum of elementary and middle schools, classroom management, lesson and unit planning, adapting instruction for individual differences, and assessment. Concurrent with EDUC 312, 311L, 315, 317, 321, 305L, SCI 322. Prerequisites: EDUC 135, 136, 136L, 225, 225L, 305, MATH 125, and admission to WheTEP. $15 field trip fee. (2)

EDUC 311L. Methods Practicum for Elementary and Middle School. An opportunity to practice some of the concepts and skills acquired in methods courses. The elementary major works with a cooperating teacher over a several week period in the spring. Concurrent with appropriate methods courses. Prerequisites: EDUC 135, 136, 136L, 225, 225L, 305, MATH 125, and admission to WheTEP. Graded pass/fail. (1)

EDUC 312. Theories and Methods: Elementary and Middle School Reading. This course is designed to foster teacher candidates’ understanding of the theoretical, pedagogical, and research-based applications of effective reading instruction. Enables candidates to develop competencies necessary to design and implement comprehensive reading programs which include evidence-based strategies that meet the developmental reading needs of K-8 students of diverse backgrounds. Concurrent with EDUC 311, 311L, 315, 317, 321, 305L, SCI 322. Prerequisites: EDUC 135, 136, 136L, 225, 225L, 305, MATH 125, and admission to WheTEP.

EDUC 315. Theories and Methods of Teaching Elementary and Middle School Mathematics. The content, techniques, and strategies in the teaching of mathematics in the elementary and middle grades. Emphasis on philosophy and concepts of mathematics instruction based on the curriculum, professional, and assessment standards of NCTM and the Illinois Professional Teaching Standards, and the Common Core State Standards. Concurrent with EDUC 312, 311, 311L, 317, 321, 305L, SCI 322. Prerequisites: EDUC 135, 136, 136L, 225, 225L, 305, MATH 125, and admission to WheTEP.

EDUC 317. Theories and Methods of Teaching Elementary and Middle School Language Arts. The theoretical and pedagogical background for teaching language arts in the context of written and oral composition, handwriting, spelling, grammar, listening, poetry, and literature. Concurrent with EDUC 312, 311, 311L, 315, 321, 305L, SCI 322. Prerequisites: EDUC 135, 136, 136L, 225, 225L, 305, MATH 125, and admission to WheTEP. (2)

EDUC 321. Theories and Methods of Teaching Elementary and Middle School Social Studies. Provides an overview of the knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes involved in social studies education. Includes the major areas of the social sciences: anthropology, economics, history, geography, political science, and sociology. Concurrent with EDUC 312, 311, 311L, 315, 317, 305L, SCI 322. Prerequisites: EDUC 135, 136, 136L, 225, 225L, 305, MATH 125, and admission to WheTEP. (2)

EDUC 324L. Methods Practicum—Middle and High School. An opportunity to practice some of the concepts and skills acquired in methods courses. The secondary education major works with a cooperating teacher for 30 hours in half-day units during the fall or spring. Completed the semester prior to student teaching. Prerequisites: EDUC 135, 136, 136L, 225, 225L, and admission to WheTEP. Graded pass/fail. (1)

EDUC 335L. Math Methods Practicum—Middle and High School. An opportunity to practice some of the concepts and skills acquired in methods courses. Secondary education candidates work with a cooperating teacher for 30 hours in half-day units during the fall or spring. Completed the semester prior to student teaching. Prerequisites: EDUC 135, 136, 136L, 225, 225L, and admission to WheTEP. Graded pass/fail. (1)

EDUC 341. Topics in Education. Specific topics in education not normally included in the curriculum. Prerequisites: EDUC 135, 136, 136L, 225, 225L, or consent of instructor. (2 or 4)

EDUC 405L. Middle Grade Practicum. An optional teacher-aiding experience in the middle grades for a full-time, five-day period when the College is not in session, usually completed during the winter or spring break. Pre-approved middle grade projects required. Graded pass/fail. (1)

EDUC 494. Senior Seminar. This course will examine the complexities of the teaching profession within the context of student teaching. Candidates will examine their experiences within the framework of readings which will inform their methods of teaching and effective interaction with students. The course will also demonstrate how research can be done within the classroom as a means to answering some of the questions which arise from their student teaching experience. Taken during the student teaching semester. (2)

EDUC 495. Problems in Education. Individual work with periodic conferences for candidates who have demonstrated ability and have definite interest in problems in a restricted field. (1-4)

EDUC 496. Student Teaching. This is an internship experience where candidates apply teaching principles in local schools and classrooms under supervision. Usually student teaching is done within a 15-mile radius of the campus. Candidates complete their student teaching in their major teaching areas. Concurrent with EDUC 497, 494.

*       Prerequisites for elementary student teaching: EDUC 135, 136, 136L, 225, 225L, 305, 305L, 311, 311L, 312, 315, 317, 321, MATH 125, SCI 322, a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the major/professional education courses, and cumulatively, admission to WheTEP, a passing score on the Illinois Licensure Testing System Elementary content-area knowledge test, clearance through completion of a fingerprint and criminal background check (at the candidate’s expense), and the recommendation of the department.

*       Prerequisites for secondary and special foreign language student teaching: EDUC 135, 136, 136L, 225, 225L, 305, 305L, a teaching methods course in the major, EDUC 324L or 335L, a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the major, in professional education courses, and cumulatively, admission to WheTEP, a passing score on the Illinois Licensure Testing System content-area test, clearance through completion of a fingerprint and criminal background check (at the candidate’s expense), and a recommendation from the department of their teaching area.

*       Prerequisites for special music student teaching: EDUC 135, 136, 225, 225L, music teaching methods studies, EDUC 305, 305L, a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the major, in professional education courses, and cumulatively, admission to WheTEP, a passing score on the Illinois Licensure Testing System content-area test, clearance through completion of a fingerprint and criminal background check (at the candidate’s expense), and a recommendation from the Conservatory.

*       Candidates are expected to take all 300- and 400-level education courses at Wheaton. Exceptions may be granted by the Department of Education. A candidate's teaching field is one in which s/he has sufficient hours to meet licensure requirements and for which s/he has obtained the recommendation of the Department. Candidates must have a major in a subject commonly taught in the public schools of Illinois. (9)

EDUC 497. Philosophical Foundations of Education. This course examines the philosophical foundations of American education from 1635 to the present. Emphasis is on a comparison of philosophical ideas in education and on the development of a personal philosophy of education. Prerequisites: EDUC 135, 136, 225, 225L, and admission to WheTEP or Department approval. Concurrent with EDUC 494, 496. Course fee $250-300. (3)

EDUC 498x. Literacy Assessment. This course is designed to explore specific problems in the teaching of the language arts beyond those covered in EDUC 312. It deals with diagnosis and recommendations for providing supportive contexts for individual differences. Prerequisites: EDUC 135, 136, 136L, 225, 225L, 312 (or equivalent), and admission to WheTEP or consent of instructor. (2) See ENG429x.

 

Revision Date: July 1, 2014

 

 

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